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v olume IV. 



APRIL, 1907 



Number 3 



OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 

OTTAWA, KANSAS 

The Quarterly Bulletin 

ANNUAL CATALOG 
1906 1907 




PVBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 



Entered at Ottawa , Kansas, as second - class matter 



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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
LIBRARY 

Class Book Volume 

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualcatalogueo1906otta 



THE SECOND EDITION OF 



THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN 



OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



The Torty-Tirst Annual Catalog 

OF OFFICERS AND 
STUDENTS FOR THE 
YEAR 1905-06, AND 

General Announcements 

TO FRIENDS, PAT- 
RONS, ALUMNI AND 
STUDENTS, BOTH 
NEW AND OLD 



OF 



CONTAINING 




PUBLISHED BY OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 
APRIL, 1906. 



A FORE-WORD. 



This issue of the Bulletin is presented to the 
public in the hope that the information relating to 
the plans and work of Ottawa University which it 
contains may be effective in cementing more firm- 
ly the friendship and co-operation of friends, pa- 
trons, alumni, and present students, and in winning 
the confidence of a still larger constituency of the 
young people for the ennobling of whose lives the 
school was founded. 

If to any young man or woman these pages shall 
open a pathway to that larger hcrizon and scope of 
life which is the rightful heritage of every young 
American, then we have fully realized our hope. 

The University stands ready to serve, and will 
count it a pleasure by correspondence and personal 
interview, wherever possible, to assist any young 
man or woman in securing the privileges of a full 
collegiate training. Correspondence addressed to 
the President of Ottawa University, at Ottawa, Kan- 
sas, will receive immediate attention. 



6 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

PART I. THE GOVERNING BODIES— 1-14. 

The University Calendar 6 

The University Corporation 8 

The Teaching Faculties 10 

Other University Officers 11 

PART II. THE OUTLOOK— 15-22. 

The History of the University 15 

The Present Equipment and Prospect 17 

The Need of the School 19 

PART III. GENERAL INFORMATION— 23-43. 

Of Interest to New Students 23 

The Student Life 27 

General University Privileges 30 

The Government of the School 32 

Special Faculty Regulations 33 

Tuitions, Fees, and Student Aid 36 

PART IV. THE SCHOOLS OF THE UNIVERSITY— 44-125. 

The College of Liberal Arts 45 

The Academy 87 

The Normal School 97 

The School of Fine Arts 103 

The Commercial School 119 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 7 

PART V. THE CATALOG OF STU DENTS— 129-148. 

March 1, 1905, to March 1, 1906. 

The College 128 

The Academy 133 

The Normal School 136 

The Fine Arts Subjects 136 

The Commercial School 141 

Totals 148 

PART VI. THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION— 149. 



PART VII.— THE PRIZES, AND DEGREES AWARDED ON THE 
OCCASION OF THE FORTIETH COMMENCEMENT. 
JUNE 7, 1905—151. 
THE INDEX 



8 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



APRIL 



APRIL, 1906. 



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JULY, 


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OCTOBER, 1906. 



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CALENDAR. 

1, 1906 JULY 



MAY, 1906. 



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AUGUST, 1906. 




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FEBRUARY, 1907. 



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1, 1907. 



JUNE, 1906 



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OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



9 



The school year of Ottawa Unversity is divided into two 
halves or semesters, each of approximately 19 weeks. The Fall 
Semester opens on the first Wednesday after the first Sunday 
of September, and continues till the last week of January. The 
Spring Semester opens on the Tuesday after the close of the Fall 
Semester, and closes on Commencement day, which occurs on 
the Wednesday following the first Sunday in June. 



THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

1906. 

Jan. 31, Wednesday, The Spring Semester opened. 

Feb. 11, Sunday, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

Aoril 5, Thursday, Mid-semester reports mailed. 

April 25, Wednesday, Charter Day. 

May 31, Thursday, > . _ ... 

June a, Saturday, j FmaI E«m,nat.ons. 

June 2, Saturday, The Inter-Society Debate, 8 p. m. 

June 3, Sunday, The Baccalaureate Sermon 10:30 a. m. 

The Annual Sermon before the Christian As- 
sociations, 8 p. m. 

June 4, Monday, The Graduating Exercises of the Senior Aca- 
demic class, 10 a. m. 
The Dobson and Hageman Prize Contests, 3 
p. m. 

Class Day Exercises, 8 p. m. 
June 5, Tuesday, Alumni Open Meeting, 10 a. m. 

Meeting of the Board of Trustees, 2 p. m. 

Field Day Contest, 3 p. m. 

Recital of the Conservatory of Music, 8 p. m. 

Alumni Banquet and Reunion, 9 p. m. 
June 6,Wednesday, The Forty-First Commencement, at 10 a. m. 

The University Reception, 8 p. m. 

THE FORTY-SECOND ACADEMIC YEAR. 
Sept. 4, Tuesday, Entrance Examinations. 
Sept. 5, Wednesday, The Fall Semester Opens, 9:30 a. m. 
Sept. 7, Friday, Reception of the Christian Associations to the 

new students, 8 to 10 p. m. 
Nov. 14, Wednesday, Mid-Semester reports mailed. 
Nov. 29, Thursday, Thanksgiving Day; school closed for the day. 
Dec. 21, Friday, Holiday Recess; school closes at noon. 

1907. 

Jan. 2, Wednesday, School resumes sessions at 8:30 a. m. 

Jan. 22, Wednesday, ) _. , _ _ _ „ _ 

Jan 24 Friday ) Fmal Examinations for the Fall Semester. 

Jan. 24, Friday, The Fall Semester closes, at 4:30 p. m. 

Jan. 29, Wednesday, The Spring Semester opens at 8:30 a. m. 



10 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



THE UNIVERSITY CORPORATION, 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Term Expires 1909. 

C. Q. CHANDLER, Wichita. A. E. SKINNER, Ottawa. 

JOHN R. BOARDMAN, Ottawa. J. V. MITCHELL, Ottawa. 

W. B. HUTCHINSON, D.D., REV. G. W. CASSIDY, Wichita. 
Lawrence. 



Term 

REV. E.B. MEREDITH, D. D., 

Ottawa. 
D. F. DANIEL, Ottawa. 
L. E. CHASE, Padonia. 



Expires 1908. 

REV. J. T. CRAWFORD, 

Parsons. 
W. H. KEITH, Ottawa. 
REV. G. W. TROUT, Pittsburg. 



Term Expires 1907. 



F. H. STANNARD, Ottawa. 
A. DOB SON, Ottawa. 
F. O. HETRICK, D.D.S., 
Ottawa. 



J. M. McWHARF, M. D., Ottawa. 
A. F. EBY, Howard. 
REV. J. A. KJELLIN, Kansas 
City, Kansas. 



Term Expires 1906. 



J. M. BOOMER, Fairview. 
M. R. HARRIS, Ottawa. 
A. WILLIS, Ottawa. 



H. E. SILLIMAN, Winfleld. 

DON KINNEY, Newton. 

REV. J. M. BARRATT, North 

Topeka. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

L. E. CHASE, President. 
C. Q. CHANDLER, Vice President. 
E. B. MEREDITH, Secretary. 
M. R. HARRIS, Treasurer. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



11 



The Auditing Committee. 

J. R. BOARDMAN, DON KINNEY, J. M. McWHARF. 

The Advertising Committee. 
M. R. HARRIS, J. V. MITCHELL. 

The Nominating Committee. 

F. H. STANNARD, Chairman; J. R. BOARDMAN, Secretary; 
REV. J. T. CRAWFORD, A. WILLIS. 

THE JOINT COMMITTEE ON MINISTERIAL STUDENTS. 

E. B. MEREDITH, W. B. HUTCHINSON, 

S. E. PRICE, E. K. CHANDLER, 

THE PRESIDENT. 



THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

A. DOBSON, Chairman; F. H. STANNARD, Secretary; 

F. O. HETRICK, A. WILLIS, J. V. MITCHELL, 
J. R. BOARDMAN, A. E. SKINNER. 

THE COMMITTEES OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Buildings and Grounds. 

F. O. HETRICK, A. E. SKINNER, J. V. MITCHELL. 

Fuel. 

A. WILLIS. 

Report on Teachers. 

J. R. BOARDMAN, A. E. SKINNER, F. H. STANNARD. 



THE CHARLTON COTTAGE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN. 

MRS. F. H. STANNARD, President; MRS. A. O. RATHBUN, 
MRS. W. E. BEACH, MRS. L. C. STINE, 

MRS. W. A. DAVENPORT, MRS. E. K. CHANDLER, 
MRS. L. R. CRAWFORD, Treasurer & Secretary. 



OFFICERS OF THE WOMEN'S EDUCATIONAL SOCIETY. 

MRS. R. S. BLACK, President 

MRS. R. A. WASSON First Vice President 

MRS. E. K. CHANDLER Second Vice President 

MRS. L. E. STANNARD Third Vice President 

MRS. F. B. PECK Secretary 

MRS. J. W. BUNN Treasurer 

MRS. A. H. WRIGHT Corresponding, Secretary 



12 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Committees and Their Chairmen. 

On Securing Homes MISS CHANEY 

On Material Aid MISS M. STICKLER 

On Programs MISS T. STEVENSON 

On Devotional Exercises MRS. E. K. CHANDLER 

On Charlton Cottage MRS. F. H. STANNARD 



THE TEACHING FACULTIES. 



RAYMOND A. SCHWEGLER, A. B., (Rev.), Acting President, 
603 Cedar St. 

Professor of Greek Literature, and Director of the 
Normal School. 



Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

MILAN L. WARD, A. M., D. D., (Rev.) ... 703 Poplar St. 
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

FRANCES C. NORRIS, A. M., on leave of absence, Oxford, Eng. 
Professor of Modern Languages, and Dean of Women. 

JAMES A. YATES, M. S 703 Mulberry St. 

Professor of Physical Science. 

EDWARD K. CHANDLER, A. M., D. D., (Rev.) . 819 S. Main St. 
Professor of History and Economics. 

WILLIAM B. WILSON, M. S . . 840 Cedar St. 

Professor of Biological Science. 

WARREN S. GORDIS, A. B., Ph. D 603 Cedar St. 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

JOHN E. BONEBRIGHT, B. S., M. A 726 Poplar St. 

Professor of Mathematics. 

CHARLOTTA J. CIPRIANI, A. B., Lit. D. (Paris) 

Charlton Cottage. 



Professor of Modern Languages, and Dean of Women, 
Vice Professor Norris, 1905-6. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



13 



MURRAY G. HILL, A. B 726 Cedar St. 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

GRANT H. CRAIN, M. Accts 832 Cedar St. 

Principal of the Commercial College. 

FLORENCE E. BEACH, A. B 912 Cedar St 

Professor of Art and Applied Design. 

HALLIE E. GASAWAY 1113 Hickory St. 

Instructor in Elocution. 

WILLIAM D. DETWILER, Mus. B 318 S. Main St. 

Dean of the Conservatory of Music, and Professor of 

Vocal Music and the History of Music. 

NELLE M. HARRIS 406 Willow St. 

Professor of Piano-forte and Interpretation. 

MRS. EMMA BROCKWAY 320 S. Main St. 

Instructor in Piano, Organ, and Guitar. 

GRACE L. SMITH 432 Elm St. 

Instructor upon the Violin, Guitar, and Mandolin. 

MRS. CORA DETWILER, Mus. B 318 S. Main St. 

Instructor in Harmony, Theory, and Acoustics. 

CHARLES E. GORMLY 224 Hickory St. 

Instructor in Brass and Wind Instruments. 

MYRTLE I. HOLLINGSWORTH 230 Cedar St. 

Instructor in Gregg Shorthand. 

HARRY H. JONES Assistant in Latin 

EARL C. PUGH Assistant in Greek 

HERBERT C. JONES Assistant in Mathematics 

ANNA McCOY Assistant in Chemistry 

RALPH E. CHRISTIE . . . Assistant in Biological Science 
RUBY KIMMEL, Assistant in the Physical Science Laboratories 
EVA HILDRETH . Assistant in Academic History— Year) 
LEOTA LIEURANCE . . . Assistant in Preparatory English 
FLORENCE R. ROBINSON, Assistant in Preparatory Branches 
J. ROSS ATCHISON Theme Reader 

OTHER OFFICERS. 

MANLY C. WAREHAM, Ph. M., Financial and Field Secretary 

CARL J. CULTER Secretary to the President 

DRUSILLA A. MOSES Office Secretary 

WARREN S. GORDIS, Ph. D. . . . Secretary of the Faculty 



14 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



WILLIAM B. WILSON, M. S. . . Registrar of the University 

OLIVE M. RAMAGE Assistant to the Registrar 

EDWARD K. CHANDLER, D. D Librarian 

HATTIE MAUPIN Assistant to the Librarian 

AUGUSTA PARRISH Assistant to the Librarian 

NORMAN E. WOOD Assistant to the Librarian 

FLORENCE R. ROBINSON .... Assistant to the Librarian 
ERNEST A. BUREAU . . . Curator, under the Professors of 
Science, of the Museum of Natural History. 



ERNEST B. COLLETT . Director of the University Orchestra 
CHARLES F. LEBOW . . . Director of the University Band 
RAYMOND E. TEALL . . Manager of the Men's University 
Glee Club, and of the Campus Quartette. 



IRA H. MASTERS Physical Instructor for Men 

WILLIE B. JONES .... Physical Instructor for Women 



MISS MARGARET STICKLER . Matron of Charlton Cottage 

CLAIRE L. REESE, MARK McCOY, 

Caretakers of Buildings and Grounds. 

ROY E. SOUTHWICK .... Attendant at the Gymnasium 
On Athletics: — Bonebright, Wilson, J. N. Atkinson, J. R. Board- 
man, the Managers of the University teams. 

On Bible Study: — Chandler, Cipriani, the Acting President. 
On Registration: — Wilson, Cipriani, Yates. 

On Bureau of Recommendation: — The President, the Registrar, 

and the Secretary of the Faculty. 
On the Library: — Chandler, Hill, Gordis. 
On the Schedule: — Wilson, Chandler, the Acting President. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



15 



PART II. THE OUTLOOK. 



The plan of this chapter is to lay before the friends and pa- 
trons of Ottawa University the salient points of the situation 
which confronts the school at the present time. It will include 
to that end a brief outline of the story of past growth, a state- 
ment in detail of the present equipment and outlook, and an in- 
dication of the line of greatest present need. 

It is hoped that this chapter, being a picture of sacrifice and 
faith crowned by a splendid fruitage, may serve to encourage a 
renewed effort, in order that the splendid opportunities lying be- 
fore the school may be seized to the fullest extent, and the name 
of the Baptist brotherhood in Kansas become for all time a syno- 
nym for enlightenment and profound spiritual insight. 



THE HISTORY OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 

Ottawa University is the state school of the Kansas Baptists. 
It stands for their convictions as to the liberty of conscience, the 
independence of the individual searcher for truth, and the final 
authority in matters religious. The school 
THE OTTAWA is an outgrowth of missionary efforts which 
INDIAN were carried on by the Baptists among the 

SCHOOL. Ottawa Indians, while the tribe was still liv- 

ing in Canada. When the Ottawas moved 
westward, the missionary teachers accompanied them on their 
migration, and when finally the Indians settled on their new res- 
ervation in Franklin county, Kansas, the work was taken up with 
renewed vigor and enthusiasm by such noble men as the 
Reverend Jotham Meeker and his wife. The leaders in 
this Indian educational movement during the sixth 
and seventh decades of the last century were the Reverend John 
Tecumseh Jones, an Indian graduate of Madison, (now Colgate), 
University, and his wife Jane Kelly Jones, a native of Maine, 
who had both settled with the Ottawas on their reservation. 

While this work was being carried on among the Indians, the 
white Baptists of Kansas, true to the traditions of the denomi- 
nation, which has always been the champion of higher education, 



16 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



had chartered "Roger Williams Univer- 
ROGER WILLIAMS sity," and at the annual meeting of the 
UNIVERSITY. State Convention, held at Atchison, in 

October of 1860, undertook to decide on 
the location of the school. While the matter was under discus- 
sion, Mr. Jones, one of the delegates from the Ottawa church, 
suggested that the white Baptists join with the Ottawa Indians 
in building the school on the reservation. A committee was ap- 
pointed to confer with the Indians, with the result that the Ot- 
tawas declared themselves in sympathy with the plan. The mat- 
ter was finally brought before Congress, and an act passed set- 
ting aside 20,000 acres of reservation land for the use of an in- 
stitution of learning. The act also appointed for the school a 
board of trustees consisting of four Indians and two whites. This 
board of trustees held its first meeting on August 20, 1862, and 
by the sale of 5,000 acres of land at $1.25 an acre, made provis- 
ion for the establishment of the new institution. From the rec- 
ords of the next few years it appears that a school was carried 
on exclusively for Indians, and that a goodly number of the chil- 
dren of the Ottawa Indians attended it. 

In 1865, in response to new conditions, the old charter of 
Roger Williams University was abandoned, and a new charter 
secured re-incorporating the school as Ottawa University, the 

change of name being made at the 
A NEW CHARTER: request of the Indian constituency. 

OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. The new charter was issued under 

the provisions of the law of 1859, 
under seal of William Tulloss, Probate Judge, on the twenty-first 
of April 1865, to I. S. Kalloch, C. C. Hutchinson, John G. Pratt, 
J. T. Jones, James Wind, William Herr, and Henry King. These 
six men formed the first board of trustees of the new corporation 
known as Ottawa University, and carried on the affairs of the 
school for several years under the dual management outlined in 
the original plan. The arrangement proved unsatisfactory, how- 
ever, to both races, and an adjustment of interests was finally 
agreed upon, by the terms of which the Indians withdrew from 
the organization, and left the school entirely in the hands of the 
whites. In 1873 the board of trustees was increased from six to 
twenty-four, and 640 acres of land were deeded to the school, to 
be forever used by the Baptists of Kansas for the work of Chris- 
tian Education. It was further arranged that the land so set 
aside should never be encumbered, and that the proceeds from 
the sale of any part of it should serve as a perpetual endowment. 
With this settlement begins the history of the Ottawa University 
of today. 

From that day to this, sometimes in the face of a grinding 
poverty, twice from the embers of a crushing fire, through forty 
years of struggle Ottawa University has remained true to the 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



17 



trust that was imposed upon her, and has 
FORTY YEARS proven herself in an ever increasing meas- 
OF SERVICE. ure a blessing and a benediction to the de- 
nomination and to the state. Thousands of 
young men and women have come to her gates asking for inspira- 
tion and for light, and having received what they sought, they 
have gone to the ends of the world, spreading everywhere, in 
church and home and society and state, the ideals and the im- 
pulses which they received while here. 

Few schools can point to a richer heritage of results accom- 
plished in so short a time. Ottawa University has today a stud- 
ent-body numbering six hundred; her alumni are scattered over 
all the known earth; no fewer than five are at the present time 
acting as missionaries on the foreign field, a number of the most 
promising pastors in Kansas are graduates of the school, and 
everywhere in places of responsibility and trust Ottawa men may 
be found. "Ottawa men make good" is the phrase which fell 
from the lips of an impartial observer only a few months ago — a 
tribute which is worth more than gold, for it is a tribute to suc- 
cess. 

The world today is better because of the noble men and 
women, who in days gone by, sacrificed and toiled to make Otta- 
wa possible. The memory of such men as Ward, Atkinson, Wil- 
liams, and Jones will live as long as grateful posterity looks 
back to its blessing and inspiration. 



THE PRESENT EQUIPMENT AND OUTLOOK. 

As a result of special efforts made from time to time to en- 
large the equipment and facilities of the school, Ottawa Univer- 
sity now controls property conservatively valued at a quarter of 
a million dollars. This property consists of lands, buildings, 
equipment and productive endowment. 

With the exception of a few platted lots and of the 33 acres 
which compose the University campus, the original grant of 
640 acres has been sold, and the proceeds added to the perma- 
nent endowment. The University also holds title 
LANDS. to a tract of land consisting of 25 acres, situated 

near Turner, Kansas, received from Joanna M. 
Lovelace, of Turner, Kansas, as the nucleus of the Merrick K. 
Barber Memorial Fund. The income resulting from the sale or 
use of this land will, when the matter is finally adjusted, be 
available for the purposes of ministerial education. 

THE BUILDINGS OF THE UNIVERSITY, FOUR IN NUMBER. 

1. — Science Hall, the original college building, is a stone struc- 
ture containing fifteen rooms devoted to lecture, laboratory and 
museum purposes. The building was originally built in 1869, 



18 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



burned in 1875, and was rebuilt in 1875, since 
BUILDINGS. which time it has served, with periodic read- 
justments, the various needs of the school. It 
is now the home of the Science departments. 

2. — Charlton College, a frame building with stone basement, 
equipped with all modern conveniences, serves as a young wom- 
en's dormitory. It was built in 1891, and is the result of the ef- 
forts of Mrs. O. C. Charlton. It furnishes living quarters for 24 
young women. 

3. — The Gymnasium is a frame structure built some years 
ago. For some time it was the best and most convenient build- 
ing of its kind in Kansas. It is still substantial, and serves to 
house the regular physical training classes, and to provide room 
and facilities for the athletic teams of the school. It contains 
three dressing rooms with lockers, a bath room and exercise 
room, and quarters for an attendant. 

4. — University Hall is the main building of the school. It is 
a stone structure of two stories and a basement, 151 feet long and 
some 60 feet in its narrowest width. It was completed in 1903, 
and takes the place of an earlier building which was destroyed 
by fire in 1902. It contains an auditorium, seating 900 persons, a 
physics laboratory, boiler room, lavatories, a library and 25 other 
rooms large and small, which serve the varied needs of the 
school. The building is thoroughly furnished, and is the best of 
its kind in the state. 

Besides the buildings thus owned on the school campus, the 
University leases quarters in the heart of the business district 
of the city, for the use of the Musical Conservatory. Convenient 
quarters are provided in this way. It is hoped that before many 
years the University will be able to erect a Fine Art's Building 
on the campus. 

The equipment of the school consists of libra- 
8PECIAL ries, laboratories, furnishings and other pro- 

EQUIPMENT. visions for doing the work of the school. 

The main library while small, is new and well 
selected. The old collection of books was swept away in the fire 
of 1902, and every book now on the shelves has been secured 
since that date. The total number of books 
THE LIBRARY. available for University work is nearly 5,000 
volumes. A reading room is carried on 
in connection with the library. It is supplied with many of the 
leading magazines and publications. 

There are five laboratories provided for the classes in the 
sciences: two for chemistry, one for physics, and two for bio- 
logical research. Room is available for two more. These work- 
rooms are fully equipped with gas, light, 
LABORATORIES. water, sewerage and heat, and contain an 
excellent collection of instruments for 
the prosecution of science work. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



19 



Five studios are maintained, one for graphic art and draw- 
ing, and the remainder in leased quarters for the use of musical 
students. Two museums are being equipped; 
STUDIOS one already occupying two large rooms, con- 

AND tains biological and geological material, and 

MUSEUMS. a second, dating since the fire of 1902, is de- 

voted to classical archaeology. 

In addition to these special facilities, every department is 
provided with the necessary furniture and apparatus for the 
proper execution of its work, so that it can fairly be said that 
most notable progress has been made in gathering together the 
mechanism of a great school. 

The endowment at the present time consists of an invested 
fund of $140,000 secured in part from the sale of lands, and in 
part from gifts of friends and patrons of the school. 

As a result of the several efforts which have been made with- 
in the last ten years, and of the generous response of the Bap- 
tists of Kansas, the University holds, 
THE ENDOWMENT. beside the sum above named, over a 

thousand pledges now in process of 
collection, which will increase the endowment fund to over 
$150,000. 



THE SCHOOL NEED. 

An excellent beginning has been made, but only a begin- 
ning. The present need is confined not only to one department, 
but appears in many, and arises from the fact that the school 
is expanding, that it owes to its constituency that no opportunity 
or method be neglected that shall enable it to render a more ef- 
fective service. The income from tuition fees cannot be expect- 
ed to cover more than a fraction of the cost of a liberal educa- 
tion. In round figures the student pays One Dollar for Three 
Dollars of service. 

We need Christian Education, because as a Christian people 
we must see to it that there shall be leaders in thought and deed, 
whose lives are permeated with the Christian ideals of morality 

and religion. The Christian 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION school is the only school which 
A WORTHY CAUSE. holds it as its supreme ideal to 

prepare men for noble, God-led 

living, and for that reason 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IS EVANGELISTIC EFFORT 
OF THE HIGHEST TYPE. 

It is more than a good investment for the Baptists of Kansas 
to provide each year for the deficit arising from the training of the 



20 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



young men and women who feel the impulse to a large life of 
service and power. 

It is blind extravagance to refuse to see to it that the young 
people who tomorrow will be the leaders in our religious and 
secular affairs are rooted and grounded in those broad, generous 
principles of truth, for which we as a people stand. The first 
step in world-evangelization, — use the word in any seuse we may, 
— involves the moulding and inspiring of the men and women 
who are, by virtue of their personal or professional qualifica- 
tions, accepted by the world at large as its leaders in thought and 
life. 

The man or woman who helps to make possible a broader 
and more generous life training for a larger number of young 
people is more truly a philanthropist than he who builds castles 
for the poor; the work of the one becomes an ever-widening 
river of life; the clay of the second will crumble into dust. 

There are two immediately pressing needs which confront 
the University at the present time. The first is concerned with 

the current expenses for the defraying 
WHAT IS NEEDED. of which some adequate provision 

must be made, while the second deals 
with essential improvements and expansion which need to be 
made at the very earliest possible moment. 

The current expenses, being in excess of the annual income 
from tuitions and present income from the endowment, must be 
met year by year, and they must be met either by a very material 
increase of the permanent endowment, or else 
MORE by continued, liberal, and regular contribu- 

ENDOWMENT. tions by the friends of Ottawa. There is 
needed an annual income of five thousand 
dollars for this purpose. An addition of $100,000 to the endow- 
ment is needed at once, in order to put the work now being done 
on a permanent basis; and while our friends are deciding on the 
giving of this sum, we need from other friends regular contribu- 
tions of comparatively small sums for the purpose mentioned. 

The expansion that must be provided for at the earliest pos- 
sible moment concerns both buildings and working equipment. 

The Science Building needs to be re- 
MORE BUILDINGS. built and enlarged in order to adapt it 

for more efficient work in these sub- 
jects which play so prominent a part in our modern educational 
system. This can be done for $20,000. 

The Gymnasium must have new lockers and bathroom fa- 
cilities provided, in a permanent addition to the present build- 
ing. This immediately needed improvement will cost $10,000 
and will enable us to provide adequately for the needs of the 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



21 



rapidly growing number of students interested in physical train- 
ing. 

The library must at the earliest possible time be provided 
with a number of books double or treble the number of those 
now on the shelves. There are few forms of endowment which 

exert a more immediate and enduring influ- 
MORE BOOKS. ence on a school than a library endowment. 

Eleven departmental libraries need to be put 
on a basis of permanent growth, and an endowment of from one 
to five thousand dollars will secure an annual income sufficient 
to secure this result. The section thus endowed will carry for all 
time the name and memory of the donor, and will secure for him 
a monument that is increased and strengthened with every pass- 
ing year. 

The friends of Ottawa have been generous in the past, and 
for their generosity they have reaped an abundant prosperity 
and blessing. We believe that, seeing the blessings which they 

have wrought both for themselves and for 
HOW TO GIVE. others by their past gifts, they will increase 

and continue their generosity, until Ottawa 
shall have taken its rightful place as one of the greatest Chris- 
tian schools of the United States. Gifts may be made in any one 
of the following ways. All gifts specifically designated will be 
sacredly used for the purpose specified. 

The first and most obvious way in which gifts may be made 
to the University is by means of cash gifts, large or small, sent 
directly to the Financial Secretary of Ottawa University. Some 
of our friends have engaged to contribute 
CASH GIFTS. each year some small sum for the current ex- 
penses of the school. One dollar thus con- 
tributed is equivalent to the income from sixteen dollars of en- 
dowment. The meaning of even the smallest contribution be- 
comes clear when it is multiplied by the large number of those 
who cannot, and ought not to give much, but who would be glad 
to give a little — if they thought it would be of any use to do so. 
Every Baptist church in Kansas, ought to take an offering once 
a year for Ottawa University. 

A second method ensuring the future of the school is by the 
transfer to it of properties during the life of the donor, with the 
provision that an annuity be paid to the donor or to any other 

person whom he may specify during the term 
ANNUITIES. of his life or during any other specific time. 

Such an arrangement secures to the donor a 
regular and safe income during his life and assures him of the 
proper disposition of his property. 

Persons desiring to aid the work of Ottawa University have 
in one or two instances done so by deeding to the school lands 



22 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



and other properties, reserving for them- 
DEED WITH selves a life interest. The property at Tur- 

LIFE INTEREST, ner, has been thus acquired, and the Uni- 
versity will be glad to receive other gifts 

of like nature. 

A constantly increasing number of Christian men and wom- 
en, who have acquired a comfortable living desire to leave some 
effective memorial when they have gone. No memorial is more 

eloquent or more enduring than an endowment 
BEQUESTS. made in connection with a Christian school of 

learning. Bequests should be made in the fol- 
lowing terms: I give and bequeath to Ottawa University, located 

at Ottawa, Kansas, the following property, on 

condition that the same shall be held as a perpetual endowment, 
and that the income derived therefrom shall be used in the fol- 
lowing manner; to-wit, 

In concluding this statement of conditions, attention should 
be called to the fact that the financial interests of Ottawa Uni- 
versity have been placed into the hands of Mr. Manly C. Ware- 
ham, a graduate of the class of 1898, and 
THE FINANCIAL a young man of ability and sane enthu- 
SECRETARY. siasm. He will be glad to correspond 

with and, wherever possible, call upon 
any of the friends of Ottawa who may desire to consider the in- 
vestment of funds in endowments or other educational benevo- 
lences. 

There is no channel of benevolence more fruitful of good 
than that of Christian education. The truest helper is he who 
helps men to help themselves. 




The Railroads Leading to Ottawa. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



23 



PART III. GENERAL INFORMATION. 



A. OF INTEREST TO NEW STUDENTS. 



t-OCATION Ottawa University is located within the corpo- 
rate limits of the city of Ottawa, the county seat 
of Franklin county, Kansas. Ottawa is a city of some eight 
thousand inhabitants, and is without question one of the safest, 
cleanest and most attractive towns in the state. It has never 
had "a joint" within its confines, and boasts of but one police- 
man on its force. There are numerous churches, some of them 
among the largest in the state, a Carnegie library, a high-school 
and four graded schools. The city has all modern improve- 
ments, including natural gas, electric light, water and sewerage. 
As a college town it is not excelled by any town in the state. 

Two railroads touch the city, the Main Colorado line of the 
Missouri Pacific Railway furnishing easy access from the east 
and west, while the Santa Fe system approaches the city from 
no less than five directions, and furnishes rapid and conven- 
ient access from all parts of the state. 



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24 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



The University is located in the southern part of the city, 
and occupies the two squares bounded by Ninth, Cedar, Elev- 
enth and Mulberry streets. During the opening days of the 
Fall Semester, committees of the Young Men's and Young Wo- 
men's Christian Associations will meet all trains, and endeav- 
or to render any needed assistance to new students in estab- 
lishing themselves in their new home. 
BOARD AND A large majority of the students of the school 
ROOMS. room in private homes in the immediate vicin- 

ity of the college campus. A large number of 
rooms is available for this purpose, at prices varying from 
eight dollars per month to fifty cents per week. A list of ap- 
proved rooms may be found in the University office. The 
school authorities will inspect every room entered on the ap- 
proved list, and students may make their selection from this 
list with entire confidence In the price, habitability and sani- 
tation of the room so approved. 

For the most part students board in public and private 
clubs, in which good substantial food may be secured at prices 
varying from $2.50 to $3.50 per week. A few students by the 
practice of rigid economy secure board for $2.00 and less per 
week. 

CHARLTON For the greater comfort of the young women 
COTTAGE. the University maintains a Women's Dormi- 
tory which furnishes quarters for a limited 
number of young women. Board and room may be had in Charl- 
ton Cottage for $3.50 per week. Students desiring to engage 
room and board, are invited to correspond with Miss Margaret 
Stickler, Matron of Charlton Cottage. The rooms of the cot- 
tage are furnished, but students are required to furnish their 

own linen and toilet articles. 
GENERAL The cost of an education depends of course very 
EXPENSE largely on the tastes and habits of the individual 

student. Some of the charges are fixed and in- 
variable, among which may be classed tuition and other school- 
fees, while others are subject to fluctuation. In order to fur- 
nish to our friends and prospective students some approxi- 
mate idea as to the cost of living at Ottawa, ten average stu- 
dents were requested to submit a careful estimate of their liv- 
ing expenses. The figures are given herewith, and may be 
taken as representing a fair average of expense during the last 
half year. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 25 



AVERAGE COST OF LIVING FOR ONE-HALF YEAR. 







2 


3 


4 


5 






8 


9 


10 


At. 




54 06 


45.00 


40 00 


30.00 


57.00 


1 

36.00 52.25 


49.50 


37.00 


40.00 


44.07 


Room 


12.50 


13.50 


11.25 


9.00 


9.50 


8.00 12.50 


13.50 


12.00 


15.00 


11.67 




8.00 


5.00 


5.00 


6.00 


5.50 


7.20 


5.00 


12.60 


10.00 


12.00 


7.63 




4.50 


4.00 


5.00 


4.00 


8.50 


4.00 


5.00 


5.00 


4.50 


5.00 


4.95 


General Expense 


20.00 


10.00 


5 00 


8.00 


19.00 


5 00 10.00 


9.00 


10.00 


15.00 


11.10 


Total 


99.00 


77.50 


66 25 


57.00 


99.50 


60.20 


84.75 


89.60 


73.50 


87.00 


79.42 



From the above table it becomes clear that the average 
present cost of living at Ottawa for students who are having 
every comfort of life is about $160.00, not counting, however, 
either tuition, laboratory fees, clothing or railroad fares, which 
must in every case be added to the estimate given above. For 
the table of college fees, please refer to 
page 36. 

SELF-SUPPORT. The city of Ottawa furnishes unusual op- 
portunities to students desiring to work 
their way through college. Each year a number of students 
work their way wholly or in part, by availing themselves of the 
opportunities presented. The University is at all times glad to 
render any possible assistance in securing work, and is not in- 
frequently able to secure openings for worthy students. The 
two Christian Associations also sustain committees for the 
special purpose of securing employment for worthy students. 
However the University cannot bind itself to supply work to 
applicants on demand, and only students with rugged health 
are advised to undertake the task of entire self-support. It is 
also suggested that students desiring to secure work come 
to Ottawa at least two weeks before the opening of school, in 
order to get matters arranged before school-work is under- 
taken. 

FURTHER IN FOR- Ottawa University has a limited num- 
MATION ON STU- ber of scholarships, prizes, loan funds, 
DENT AID. and other forms of student aid available 

for worthy students. Those interested in these provisions will 
find them stated in full on pages 39 to 43 of this 
catalog. 

ENTRANCE RE- The entrance requirements which the stu- 
QUI REMENTS. dent must meet are for the sake of clear- 
ness stated separately in connection with 
the general statement of the work presented by each of the 
schools of the University. The references given below will di- 
rect those interested to the page containing the special informa- 
tion desired. 



26 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



The College page 47 

The Academy page 89 

The Normal School page 99 

The School of Fine Arts page 105 

The Commercial College page 120 



CREDENTIALS. Students intending to enter any of the 
schools of Ottawa University will be re- 
quired to present proper credentials before being admitted. 

The first of these credentials is a letter or certificate of 
good moral character signed by the pastor of the local church, 
or by some responsible person who has accurate knowledge of 
the candidate, and who is able to recommend him to the author- 
ities of Ottawa University as a person worthy of the advantages 
of a Christian school. This letter must be presented to the 
president on the day of entrance and matriculation, regardless 
of the department which the candidate wishes to enter. 

The second credential consists of a list of grades earned 
in the schools previously attended, accompanied by a letter of 
honorable dismissal if the student for any reason did not com- 
plete his course in the school last attended. This second cre- 
dential may properly be mailed to the Registrar of Ottawa Uni- 
versity before the opening of the school year, and if accom- 
panied by proper catalogs and other descriptions of the courses 
for which grades are offered, this will greatly simplify the 
work of classification when the student arrives. 

Students who desire to enter the College of the University 
and who are graduates of High Schools accredited by the State 
University of Kansas, will simply submit a certificate of gradu- 
ation, accompanied by a certified list of the courses taken in 

the High School. 
ENTRANCE Entrance examinations will be conducted 

EXAMINATIONS. at Ottawa in University Hall, on the 
morning of September 4, 1906, in all sub- 
jects required for entrance to the courses of the College, the 
school of Fine Arts, and the Normal School. All students who 
present grades from unaccredited schools, and who have not sat- 
isfied the Registration committee of the satisfactory quality of 
their work, will be required to take the entrance examinations 
in the subjects not approved. Candidates who present their 
grades by mail, may learn in advance in what subjects the en- 
trance examination will be required of them. In special cases, 
if the conditions of the student are but slight, the entrance ex- 
amination may be postponed to some later day. The University 
faculties will be less ready to overlook weakness in English 
preparation than in any other department. Students are urged 
to send in advance every available credential in order to sim- 
plify the work of the registering officials on the opening day. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



27 



MATRICULA- Every student must at his entrance into the 
TION AND EN- University, regardless of the school which 
ROLL ME NT. he wishes to enter, appear in the office of 
the president, present his letters of introduc- 
tion, and receive his matriculation card. No student, whether 
new or old, will be enrolled at the opening of any semester, un- 
less he presents to the registration officers his matriculation 
card, properly signed and sealed with the seal of the University. 

Having secured his matriculation card, and having thereby 
been duly admitted into the University, the student will next 
appear before the registration committee of the school which he 
proposes to enter. This committee will, on presentation of his 
matriculation card, issue to him an enrollment card, carrying 
the names and numbers of the courses which be is to take dur- 
ing the next semester, and will also issue to him a bill for 
tuition, incidental fees, and other University charges involved 
in his course. 

The student will now present himself before the treasurer, 
and will there settle his bills, whereupon the treasurer will 
stamp the enrollment card, and will receipt the bill. All bills 
are made out in full, and all beneficiaries of the University 
must secure orders for the amount of their tuition credit as in- 
dicated on pages 38 to 43 of this catalog. 

The candidate will now return to the office of the president, 
where the secretary will assign to him a seat in chapel, check 
his bill, and as final warrant, will affix the University seal to the 
registration card. The student is now ready to attend his 
classes and lectures. The registration card, stamped by the 
treasurer, and sealed with the University seal, must be shown 

to every instructor on entrance into the class. 
IF IN DOUBT, In closing this chapter of detailed advice to 
WRITE. the new student, the University wishes 

again to emphasize its readiness to assist 
any young man or woman who desires to enter Ottawa Univer- 
sity. All correspondence will be promptly and cheerfully answer- 
ed, and prospective students are urged to ask questions until 
the way is entirely clear and open. 



B. THE STUDENT LIFE. 

The student life at Ottawa is simple and democratic. Lit- 
tle if any of the friction arising from the clannishness of 
wealth or from social distinctions exists, nor would it be toler- 
ated if any attempt were made to introduce it. The school is 
co-educational, and the students, both male and female, move 
on a plane of entire parity, with little regard to wealth or so- 
cial pre-eminence. The spirit of Ottawa is whole-souled, tern- 



28 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



perate, clean, and Christian. The special phases of the school- 
life are directed by a number of organizations among which 

the following are to be mentioned. 
LITERARY The Philalethean and the Olympian Literary 
SOCIETIES. societies control the voluntary literary work 

of the college and academy. Each of the so- 
cieties is divided into two sections, meeting weekly for debate 
and other literary exercise. The societies have for many years 
carried on a most valuable work, and each numbers in its 
ranks many of the stronger students. The work at present is 
carried on under the indirect supervision of the faculty in ex- 
cellently appointed halls, and is of uniform profit to those who 
partake in it. An annual debate, between representatives of the 
two societies is held in connection with the Commencement ex- 
ercises. 

THE ORATORICAL Another organization which serves to 
ASSOCIATION. stimulate and direct student activity in 

the college, is the Oratorical Association, 
a chartered body of some thirty members, which in connec- 
tion with similar societies in other Kansas colleges, maintains 
at stated times local, state and interstate oratorical contests. 
The society also publishes a monthly magazine, entitled "The 
Campus," which is the organ of the students of Ottawa Univer- 
sity, and which has received very favorable notice at the hands 
of its critics. 

THE ATHLETIC The body which directly represents the stu- 
ASSOCIATION. dents in the maintenance and direction of 
the various forms of college sport, is the 
Athletic Association. The temper of the entire University, in- 
cluding both the governing board and the student body, is dis- 
tinctly in favor of clean, sane athletics, and every effort of the 
association is in this direction. An increasing interest is being 
taken in the scheduled games, better provision is being made 
for the teams, and a splendid enthusiasm is being shown in the 
various forms of physical training. The teams in their public 
contests are directly governed by a joint committee of five, com- 
posed of two members from the faculty, one member from the 
Board of Trustees, one alumni member, and the manager of 
the team playing the game. For special faculty rules governing 
this committee, see page 35 of this catalog. 
THE MUSICAL The University has for some years main- 
ORGANIZATIONS. tained a number of very creditable musical 
organizations. For the most part these 
are general student organizations, and are not related to the 
Conservatory. These musical societies take a prominent part 
in the social and organic life of the school, and form one of 
its distinguishing features. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



29 



The College Orchestra has for nearly ten years carried on 
its work with a steady and commendable growth. It assists at 
the daily public worship of the school, gives occasional con- 
certs at home, and has gone out to neighboring cities to give 
concert numbers on local courses. 

The College Band is an organization which appears on oc- 
casions of a public and patriotic nature. It aids at athletic 
games, processions and other occasions, and its work has in 
the past served greatly to enliven the public assemblies of the 
school. 

The Campus Quartette is well known over the state of Kan- 
sas. It is the official quartette of the University, and has on 
several occasions arranged for extended tours through the state 
in connection with the work of churches and societies. The 
organization ranks among the best in the middle west, as is at- 
tested by the words of hearty commendation which are every- 
where heard concerning it, both at home and abroad. 

A newly organized Men's Glee Club of some sixteen or more 
voices is now in training, and bids fair to add a valuable ele- 
ment to the musical equipment of the student life. The manage- 
ment of the school most heartily encourages each of these or- 
ganizations in its special work, under the conviction that as 
spontaneous manifestations of ability and enthusiasm they 
may greatly serve to mould the student life, and to develop 
the individual student. 

THE CHRISTIAN Foremost in shaping the social as well as 
ASSOCIATIONS the religious life of every department of Ot- 
tawa University are the two Christian As- 
sociations, more commonly known by the conventional abbre- 
viations of Y. M., and Y. W. C. A. These two societies embrace 
a large part of the student body in their respective member- 
ships. Each of the societies has on the ground floor of Uni 
versity Hall a room set apart as a rest and study room, and 
serving as a local center for the various activities for which the 
societies stand. The special work of both the Associations is 
done by means of occasional social gatherings, by means of re- 
ligious meetings held in the two literary society halls on Sun- 
day afternoons, and by means of carefully organized Bible and 
Mission Study classes. 

The influence of these two societies is excellent, and they 
do much to stimulate an undertone of reverence in the school. 
Each of the Christian Associations maintains bureaus for the 
assistance of new students in finding rooms, roommates, work, 
boarding places and other necessaries. This service is render- 
ed free of charge and gladly, and all new students are urged to 
avail themselves of the facilities presented. 



30 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



The ministerial students of the University have for years 
been banded together into an Association for the purpose of 
furthering their mutual interests. The Association meets once 

each week under the general direction 
THE MINISTERIAL of one of the clerical members of the 
ASSOCIATION. faculty, for the reading and discussion 

of papers and topics of interest, and for 
the presentation of reports relating to work accomplished. The 
amount of work done on the various fields near Ottawa by the 
members of this Association is more than com- 
mendable, and deserves the sincerest praise of all 
true friends of an advancing gospel. It is worthy 
of note that not a few of the strongest pastors of Kansas 
Baptist churches were formerly members of this society, and 
that several are now serving on foreign fields as missionaries. 

In this connection it is also proper to note, that the tone and 
impulse of Ottawa University in every one of its departments is 
distinctly and fundamentally Christian. Every reasonable influ- 
ence is brought to bear toward this end, 
THE RELIGIOUS and the plan and purpose of the manage- 
INFLUENCES. ment is to permeate the entire school with 

the dominant purpose of the Christ. The 
students of the University meet each school day for public wor- 
ship, consisting of scripture-reading, prayer and the 
singing of hymns. The assistance of prominent 
men stopping in Ottawa is secured for this ser- 
vice whenever possible. All students are expected to 
unite with, or at least regularly to attend the services of the 
church of their choice while in Ottawa, and stress is put on the 
weekly religious meetings of the Christian Associations. 
Abundant opportunity is given for the study of the Sacred 
Scriptures both under University auspices and in private 
classes. Every effort is made in a quiet natural way to unite 
with the best of intellectual training also the inculcation of 
spirit and heart power. 



C. GENERAL UNIVERSITY PRIVILEGES. 

Beside the general provisions of buildings, laboratories, 
class-rooms, offices and other appointments which are elsewhere 
mentioned in their appropriate places, the following facilities 
are provided for the use and benefit of University stu- 
dents. 

READING ROOM In direct connection with the main library 
the University maintains a public reading 
room, open to the use of all the students. A large number of 
the leading monthly and daily publications is kept on file, 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



31 



and new additions are being made from time to time as the 
liberality and thoughtfulness of our friends permit. 

Students are availing themselves in large numbers of the 

material put at their disposal, and it is believed that the use 
of the reading room contributes largely to the growth and 
symmetry of mental and moral power. 

THE LIBRARY. In addition to the reading room, the Univer- 
sity maintains and puts at the disposal of its 
students a select and rapidly growing library. Few libraries 
are so free from useless material as is the one now in the pos- 
session of the school. The library is open from eight till five 
each school-day, and all students are permitted under certain 
reasonable restrictions, which may be found posted in the li- 
brary and reading room, to draw books for home use. No extra 
charge is made for the use of either the reading room or the 
library. 

Arranged in various convenient rooms in the buildings of 
the school are special departmental libraries, which are partly 
the property of the instructors and partly that of the school. 
These special libraries, though small, are well selected, and are, 
subject to reasonable restrictions, at the service of the stu- 
dent pursuing the work of the departments involved. For furth- 
er special equipment of the departments see the statements pre- 
physical cul fixed to the various departmental chapters. 

" The gymnasium, built some years ago as a 
result of the interest and activity of former 
friends and students of the school, has been from time to time 
improved and re-equipped, and serves now to meet the needs of 
that constantly growing number of students who appreciate the 
worth and necessity of physical training. Classes in physical 
work are organized early each year for each of the sexes, and 
the courses of training are supervised by qualified teachers. No 
charge is made to students for this service, and all are urged 
to avail themselves of the opportunities presented. 

In addition to the formal class room work the University 
bas provided room for tennis-courts, quarter-mile cinder track, a 
baseball diamond, a gridiron, and facilities for basketball. An 
attempt has been made to provide for the necessities of every 
student. There is reason to hope that in the near future a sub- 
stantial addition to the gymnasium will add materially to the bath 
and locker facilities, and will make the work of physical train- 
ing even more pleasant and profitable. 

LECTURE A large part of a liberal education is after all 
COURSES. gained, not from books, but from men. Ottawa 
is fortunately situated in this regard. It is the 
home of the widely known Ottawa Chatauqua, which indirect- 



32 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



ly brings to the city at various times of the year, some of the 
most noted men of the day. Many of these men can be pre- 
vailed upon to appear before the students, an opportunity of 
great value to those who enjoy it. 

Besides these more or less irregular visitors, there are 
brought to Ottawa each year, directly under the patronage of 
the University, in connection with the University lecture 
course, some of the most noted lecturers and entertainers on the 
American platform. Its favorable situation on two great high- 
ways of travel east and west, make Ottawa fortunate in the 
number of the great men who from time to time become avail- 
able. 



D. THE GOVERNMENT OF THE SCHOOL 

THE SCHOOL The government of Ottawa University presup- 
IDEAL. poses a relation of harmony and mutual help- 

fulness. The school is conceived of as a 
small state, every activity and function of which shall 
prepare and train the student for the larger world 
in which he is to take his place after gradu- 
ation. While strict attention is paid to the quality and kind 
of work which is produced, a far greater emphasis is laid on the 
development of breadth of sympathy, and depth of character 
which shall give balance and power to the later life of the 
student. Manhood and womanhood are esteemed of supreme 
worth. 

The matter of school discipline is left largely in the hands 
of the students themselves, and only such rules and regulations 
are instituted as shall serve to increase the efficiency and tone 
of the school life. A formal system of student self-govern- 
ment is in process of growth, and the results already accom- 
plished give promise of good result in improving the tone and 
dignity of every phase of school activity. 
THE FACULTY IN In direct harmony with the school-ideal 
ITS RELATIONS. above outlined, the faculty is a unit in 
its desire to be of assistance in every 
practicable way, in the stimulation and quickening of the latent 
personal power of each individual student. Whether as a teach- 
ing body, or in its advisory or legislative functions, the aim of 
the faculty is always to see the man at the end of the school- 
process, rather than the routine school mechanism. The dis- 
cipline is therefore firm but generous, the class room work 
careful, exact, and earnest, and the influence, both in and out 
of the class room, strong, straight-forward and stimulating. 
The students come directly and early in their course into con- 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



33 



tact with the heads of the departments. The advantage of 
such stimulating contact both in an official and social way can 
be truly appreciated only by those who have seen the detailed 
workings of "the large college." 

THE SEMES- The school year is divided into two nearly 
TER PLAN. equal halves each approximately nineteen 
weeks in length called semesters. The Fall 
Semester of 1906 opens on the morning of September fifth, at 
9 : 30, with public exercises in University Hall. 

EXAMINATIONS Final examinations are held in all subjects 
AND GRADES. at the end of every semester, and written 
tests are given at such other times during 
the semester as the judgment of the teacher in charge may 
direct. A careful record is also kept of the daily class room 
work of the student, and in the computation of all official 
grades the class room record has twice the value of the final 
examination. A minimum average of "C" is required as passing 
grade. 

An approximate grade is sent to the parents or guardians 
near the middle of each semester, and a copy of the final grades 
is sent soon after the close of the last examina- 
tions. 

FACULTY REPORTS The members of the faculty report on 
ON DELINQUENTS. Saturday of each week all cases of 
delinquency, whether of conduct, at- 
tendance, or of work. A careful record of these weekly reports 
is kept, and the student is warned. If the delinquency is repeat- 
ed and not satisfactorily explained, the parent or guardian of the 
student is informed, and the case taken up for faculty advise- 
ment. Ottawa University does not desire the attendance of 
vicious, irresponsible or inactive students, and any young man 
or young woman failing to meet the standard above outlined 
will be required to sever his connection with the school. 



E. SPECIAL FACULTY REGULATIONS. 



For the purpose of promoting the tone and harmony 
of the school in its various functions, the faculty 
of Ottawa University has formulated the following reg- 
ulations. Students and all others concerned are requested to 
note these provisions carefully. These regulations are subject 
to change without notice. 



34 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



On Grading Marks. 

A rule to be followed in grading students in the various 
schools of the University. 

"A" shall indicate "excellent work." 
"B" shall be applied to "good work." 

"C" shall be used to indicate "fair" work of approximate- 
ly pass grade. 

"D" shall denote a "conditional failure," which may be 
made up by special examination or otherwise. 

"F" shall indicate "total failure," work to be done again. 

The Absence Rule. 

A rule to govern students in the matter of absences from 
University exercises. 

A. Students may, for good cause, absent themselves from 
one-twentieth of the total number of class exercises in any sub- 
ject for which they are registered, without affecting their stand- 
ing. 

NOTE:— The number of absences thus allowed is as follows: 

5 hour subjects . . . . .4 absences 

4 hour subjects , . . . . 4 absences 

3 hour subjects . . . . .2 absences 

2 hour subjects ...... 2 absences 

1 hour subjects . . . . .1 absence 

B. Students wba absent themselves from more than one- 
twentieth of the total number of the required exercises of any 
one of their classes, will be marked "F" for each recitation so 
missed, unless the work is made up to the satisfaction of the 
instructor involved. 

C. Any student who during any semester shall absent him- 
self from ten per cent of the exercises of a class in which he 
is registered, and who shall not have been excused by the 
president, shall be suspended from that course, and shall either 
be required to take that course over again, or to arrange for it 
in some other satisfactory manner. 

D. Any student who in any Semester shall be absent from 
more than seven chapel exercises, will, unless excused by the 
officer in charge of the chapel rolls, be required to do extra 
work in the subject in which he ranks lowest, at the rate of 
one regular lesson or its equivalent for every absence in excess 
of the number allowed; and no final pass grade will be given in 
the subject involved until the work so prescribed has been sat- 
isfactorily done. 

The Deficiency Rule. 

A rule applying to students who without satisfactory rea- 
son fail in their studies. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



35 



A. Any student who in any Semester fails in eight or more 
hours of his work, shall lose his regular class standing, and 
shall be classed as a special student until the work is satisfac- 
torily made up. 

B. Any special student who in any semester, without tho- 
roughly satisfactory reason shall fail to do creditable work in 
the courses for which he is registered shall be suspended from 
the privileges of the University. 

Examination for Advanced Standing. 

Any student who either through failure, conflict of time 
schedule, or for other reasons is unable to take a required sub- 
ject with a class, may, if the instructor in the subject concerned 
considers it feasible, be accorded the privilege of a special ex- 
amination. If this examination is passed with high credit, the 
student will be accorded a final grade on the records of the Uni- 
versity. For every such examination taken, the candidate must 
pay to the Registrar a fee of two dollars, and no examination 
will be given except on presentation to the examiner of a re- 
ceipt showing payment of the fee for the proposed examination. 

The Athletic Rule. 

A rule relating to athletic and other contests in which stu- 
dents of the University may engage. 

A. No student shall be permitted to take part in any con- 
test as a representative of Ottawa University, who shall not 
have paid, or satisfactorily arranged for, by means of negoti- 
able securities, his full tuition for the semester in which the 
contest takes place. No official or student of the University 
shall be permitted to act as surety in such cases. 

B. No student shall be permitted to take part in any pub- 
lic contest as a representative of Ottawa University who is 
not registered for twelve or more hours of classroom work 
each week, and who is not maintaining a creditable standing 
in all the work for which he is registered. Creditable stand- 
ing shall be interpreted to mean a class grade of "C" or more, 
maintained during the three weeks immediately preceding the 
contest. 

C. The chairman of the Athletic Committee shall in every 
case examine into the qualifications and standing of each can- 
didate not less than forty-eight hours before the contest, and 
if the candidate proves unqualified, he shall be debarred from 
the contest. 

D. The function of the University Athletic Committee shall 
be extended to cover all organizations appearing in public con- 
tests of any kind whatsoever. 



36 THE ANNUAL CATALOG 

E. No athletic or other contest shall be held on any school- 
day during school hours by teams representing Ottawa Univer- 
sity, without the special consent of the faculties, secured at least 
four days before the event in question. 

The Registration Rule. 

A rule applying to registration, changes of course, late ar- 
rival, maximum course, grade transcripts, and term bills. 

A. The first two days of each semester shall be set aside 
for the registration of students, and for the adjustment of term 
bills. Special announcement may, however, be made for the 
registration days for the second semester. 

B. Any student who fails to register on the day appoint- 
ed, shall be required to pay a late registration fee of one dol- 
lar unless he be for good cause excused by the registration com- 
mittee. 

C. No student, having once registered with the registration 
committee in any course shall be permitted to drop that course 
without securing the written permission of the teacher involved, 
countersigned by the president. Failure to obey this rule will 
subject the student to college discipline as a delinquent in the 
study dropped. 

D. No student shall be allowed to register for more than 
twenty (20) hours of classroom work, unless specially permit- 
ted to do so by the faculty. 

E. No new student shall be allowed to register for more 
than twenty hours of class-room work until at least one semes- 
ter of work has been completed with high credit. 

F. All students who one year or more after suspending 
their work at Ottawa shall desire a transcript of the grades 
earned while here, shall be required to pay a transcript fee of 
one dollar. Transcripts issued less than one year after the 
suspension of work will involve the payment of a clerical fee 
of twenty-five cents. 

G. Term bills are in every case due on the first day of the 
semester, and no student will be admitted to classes without 
presenting a registration card bearing the seal of the Univer- 
sity, and the stamp of the Treasurer. No extensions will be 
granted in any case except on the written order of the presi- 
dent. (For detail of the registration routine see page 27 of this 
catalog.) 

F. TUITION, FEES, AND STUDENT AID. 

GENERAL The cost of tuition in all the schools of the Uni- 
TUITIONS. versity except the School of Fine Arts is eight- 
een dollars for each semester. To this must 
be added an incidental fee of two dollars for each semester, 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



37 



making the total cost for the semester twenty dollars. Tui- 
tion must in every case be paid in advance for the full semes- 
ter. Students preferring to pay one year's tuition and inci- 
dental fees in advance, and who do so within the first week of 
the opening semester, will be allowed a rebate of two dollars, 
making the charge for the entire year thirty-eight dollars. 

The tuition charge for students registering for three hours 
or less is five dollars, and the entire incidental fee. A student 
registered for more than three hours will be charged at the rate 
of $j.50 for every hour, but the tuition shall not be more than 
$18.00 per semester. In case of withdrawal from the University 
owing to illness or other necessary and unavoidable causes a 
non-negotiable credit slip will be issued to the student for the 
unconsumed tuition still due him. He may use this credit in 
partial payment of any subsequent semester's tuition. If un- 
able to re-enter school, the student may make a cash settlement, 
but in all cases at least one-half of the semester's tuition and 
incidental fee will be retained. Laboratory fees cannot be re- 
claimed after the second day of the semester. 

The rates of tuition which hold at present in the various 
departments of the School of Fine Arts are stated in connection 
with the outline of the work of that school. 

LABORATORY. In addition to the tuition and incidental fee 
FEES. above mentioned, a further charge is made in 

connection with certain courses for material 
used in experimentation, and for the loan and wear and tear of 
instruments. The schedule is given below: 



Anatomy, (G 2 XII), $5.00 

Bacteriology, (G 2 XI), 3.00 

Botany, A, and B, each 3.00 

Botany, (G 2 II), (G 1 IV), each 4.00 

Chemistry, (G 1 II), (G 1 IV), each 4.00 

Chemistry, (G 1 II), (G 1 III), each 5.00 

Cytology, (G 2 VIII), 5.00 

General Biology, (G 2 I), 3.00 

Histology, (G 2 VII), 4.00 

Neurology, (G 2 X), 2.00 

Phonograph rental, per semester 1.00 

Physics, all courses, 3.00 

Physiology, (G 2 IX), 2.00 

Physiography, A, and B 2.00 

Typewriter rental 4.00 

Zoology, (G 2 IV), (G 2 V), each 3.00 



For every degree conferred by the College of Liberal Arts 
and by the School of Fine Arts a diploma fee of $5.00 is col- 
lected. The Commercial College charges a fee of $1.50 for every 
diploma issued. 



38 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



ENDOWED Thanks to the generosity of some of the 

SCHOLARSHIPS. friends of the University, there have been 
provided from time to time endowment 
funds for a series of scholarships. These scholarships are in 
part at the disposal of the faculty, and in part are controlled by 
the donor or by his agents. Correspondence relating to scholar- 
ships should be addressed directly to the president of the Univer- 
sity. The scholarships now in force are as follows: 

The Slocomb Scholarship. — By the will of the late H. O. 
Slocomb, of Chalk Mound, Kansas, the residue of his estate, 
one thousand dollars, forms a perpetual scholarship, the inter- 
est of which is annually given to a student for the ministry 
whom the faculty may designate. 

The Endowment Scholarships. — For the purpose of assist- 
ing the growth of the endowment, a number of the friends of 
the school have in recent years provided funds for perpetual 
scholarships. These scholarships cover the cost of tuition only, 
and are available in all the schools of the University except in 
the School of Fine Arts. For the most part the disposition of 
these scholarships rests with the founders, though a number 
have been placed in the control of the president and the faculty. 
The endowment scholarships are as follows: 

1. The Octavia Reed Scholarship established by Mrs. Oc- 
tavia Reed, of Louisburg. 

2. The Harriet Chase Tyler Scholarship by Mr. J. S. Tyler, 
of Fairview. 

3. The James M. Chase Scholarship by Mr. L. E. Chase, 
of Padonia. 

4. The Luceba M. and William F. Holroyd Scholarship by 
Mr. W. F. and Miss L. M. Holroyd, of Cedarvale. 

5. The John Nelson Scholarship by Mr. John Nelson, of 
Ottawa. 

6. The Abigail Bevington Scholarship by Mrs. Abigail Bev- 
ington, of Iola. 

7. The Simeon Cole Scholarship by Mr. Simeon Cole, of Mc- 
Louth. 

8. The Peter and Matilda Bolinger Scholarship by Rev. 
Peter Bolinger, of Bogue. 

9. The Oscar J. and Alice A. Holroyd Scholarship by Mr. 
O. J. Holroyd, of Hewins. 

10. The Pearl B. Kellogg Scholarship, by D. D. Kellogg, of 
Kellogg, Kansas. 

11. The Robert W. and Margaret A. Black Scholarship by 
Mr. R. W. Black, of Elgin. 

12. The Augustus S. Thompson Scholarship by Mr. A. S. 
Thompson, of Cherryvale. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



39 



13. The Harry W. and Jennie M. Grass Scholarship by Mr. 
H. W. Grass, of LaCrosse. 

14. The Henry H. and Hattie E. Twining Scholarship by 
Mr. H. H. Twining, of Homestead. 

15. The Cordelia Russell Scholarship by Mrs. Cordelia 
Russell, of Derby. 

16. The William W. and Louisa D. Loveless Scholarship by 
Mr. W. W. Loveless, of Marion. 

17. The Theodore F. and Cynthia E. Bradbury Scholarship 
by Mr. T. F. Bradbury, of McPherson. 

18. The James P. and Sadie D. Hall Scholarship by Mr. J. 
P. Hall, of Medicine Lodge. 

19. The Stephen L. and Alice Umberger Scholarship by Mr. 
S. L. Umberger, of Larned. 

20. The William H. and Lois N. Parish Scholarship by Mr. 
W. H. Parish, of Leoti. 

21. The Abraham C. and Eliza F. Miles Scholarship by Mr. 
A. C. Miles, of Conway Springs. 

22. The C. L. and C. G. Kinney Scholarship by C. L. and 
C. G. Kinney, of Newton. 



The Fern Willis Scholarship Fund. — In memory of his daugh- 
ter Fern, Mr. A. Willis, for many years a member of the Board 
of Trustees of Ottawa University, has deposited with the treas- 
urer of the University the sum of One Thousand dollars, to form 
a trust fund. The income from this fund shall be used each year 
to assist in defraying the expenses of a young woman of mod- 
erate or humble circumstances who shall be a graduate of the 
Ottawa High School. The choice of such a person will be made 
by a committee composed of the Board of Education of the City 
of Ottawa, the Superintendent of the schools of Ottawa, and the 
Pastor of the First Baptist church of Ottawa. Preference will be 
shown to a young woman whose class standing is high, and who 
is a member of the Baptist church. If the beneficiary of this 
scholarship proves worthy, the benefits will be extended through- 
miniqtpriai out her entire c° lle S e course, 

ftruni ADftuioft In recognition of the constant and unfail- 
SCHOLARSHIPS. ing support whicn the Uniyers ity has re- 
ceived ever since its earliest days from its constituent denom- 
ination, the most liberal provision is made for the higher educa- 
tion of a ministry which shall take up the work of Christian 
evangelization. Acting directly in connection with the Educa- 
tional Commission of the Kansas Baptist Convention, the Board 
of Trustees of Ottawa University has appointed a committee of 
five persons to take charge of the work of extending scholar- 
ship aid to students for the Christian ministry. 



40 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



The Committee of Five meets during the first week of every 
semester, to examine into the records, work, credentials and 
general qualifications of every student for the ministry who 
desires scholarship aid. Candidates appearing before the com- 
mittee for the first time, are requested to bring a license or 
other credential from the home church or pastor. 

An order on the Treasurer of the University for full tuition 
is issued to those candidates who appear to the committee to 
be showing evidence of creditable progress in their work, and 
stability in their purpose, and who are manifesting by their 
daily walk their consecration to the calling to which they aspire. 

Every ministerial student who desires to avail himself of 
this provision for free tuition, must appear before the commit- 
tee at its regular meeting during the first week of each semester, 
for a conference relating to his class-standing and general pro- 
gress. If the committee is satisfied with the standing and en- 
deavor of the candidate, a new tuition order will be issued for 
the ensuing semester. If the student's progress or standing is 
not entirely creditable and no satisfactory explanation is offered, 
further aid will be withdrawn, until the student has done at least 
one semester's work in a thoroughly creditable manner. 

The orders for tuition issued under this provision are given 
without any conditions other than that if the student fails to 
enter the Christian ministry he binds himself to repay into the 
treasury of the University with interest all tuition advanced by 
the order of the committee. 

The Committee of Five serves also as the authorized exam- 
ining agent for the Loan Fund of the Educational Commission. 
Students interested in this matter are referred to the chairman 
of the committee. 

THE CHILDREN Partly as a recognition of the splendid loyal- 
OF MINISTERS, ty of the ministry of Kansas to Ottawa Uni- 
versity, and partly to aid the pastors of the 
Baptist churches in securing for their Children the advantages 
of a higher education, the Board of Trustees extends to the chil- 
dren of Christian clergymen who depend on their clerical labors 
for their support, scholarships entitling them to one-half tuition. 
These scholarships are issued anew for each successive semes- 
ter, and never for an entire year. Blank application forms may 
be secured by addressing the President of the University. 

The continuance of the privilege extended by this provision 
is made entirely dependent on the satisfactory standing and de- 
meanor of the student. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



41 



UNIVERSITY Ottawa University in common with the oth- 

SCHOLARSHIPS. er Christian colleges of Kansas, offers each 
year as a reward for superior accomplish- 
ments, a scholarship granting free tuition for one year in the 
Academy, College, or Normal School, to that student in the grad- 
uating class of any grade school, high school or academy in Kan- 
sas, or the contiguous territory, who shall rank highest in his 
class, and who desires to continue his education. Blanks for this 
purpose may be secured from the principal or teacher of the lo- 
cal school; or if a blank has not been deposited, a copy will be 
sent on receipt of the name of the principal or superintendent in 
charge of the school involved. 

THE WOMEN'S Tn ^ nks to tne generous and efficient aid and 
LOAN FUND co-operation of the Women's Educational So- 
ciety there has been accomplished among oth- 
er worthy things, the establishment of a small loan fund, which 
is without interest loaned to needy young women in the student 
body. The local society co-operates in other ways with the fac- 
ulty and the authorities of the University in promoting the phy- 
sical, spiritual and moral welfare of the female students, and not 
infrequently it has been able to render timely and much needed 
aid to worthy young women. For a list of the officers please see 
page 9. Though the society has its headquarters at Ottawa, any 
lady may join the organization and thus give her aid to this 
worthy and much needed cause. The annual fee of one dollar is 
used to swell the loan fund above mentioned. 

From time to time the University is able to af- 
UNIVERSITY ford to a limited number of students work eith- 
LABOR. er as assistants, monitors janitors or otherwise. 

The supply of work is, however, strictly limited, 
and only students who are energetic and reliable are retained on 
the pay-rolls. Positions are awarded in the order of application, 
and under a merit system. 

A number of prizes are offered in various depart- 
PRIZES. ments of the University for excellence in spec- 
ial lines of work. The prizes so offered for the cur- 
rent year are indicated below. 

The Dobson Prizes, amounting to ten and five dollars re- 
spectively, the gift of Mr. A. Dobson, of Ottawa, are awarded to 
the two members of the Junior Class who excel in the prepar- 
ation and delivery of original orations. The contest is held 
during commencement week. 

The Hageman Prizes, amounting also to ten and five dol- 
lars, are awarded to the two members of the Freshman Class 
who excel in declamations. They are the gift of Mr. T. J. Hage- 
man, of Clifton, Kansas, and his son, Rev. S. S. Hageman, '93, 



42 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



pastor of the First Baptist Church, Abilene, Kansas. The con- 
test is held in connection with the Dobson Prize Contest. 

The Kinney Prizes, the first of ten and a second of five dol- 
lars, are given by Mr. Don Kinney, of Newton, KaDsas, to the 
two members of the Sophomore Class who write the best and 
the second best essay upon one of several subjects assigned by 
the faculty. Each essay must contain from 1,800 to 3,000 words, 
and three copies of it must be handed to the head of the depart- 
ment of English on the fifteenth of March. Participation in 
this contest is not compulsory, but each Sophomore who partici- 
pates in the contest, and who attains a rank of not less than B, 
is excused from the preparation of two of the required essays. 

The subjects assigned to the Class of 1908 for the present 
year are as follows: 

1. "Individual Tenure of Land." 

2. "The Detection of Impurities in Water, and Remedies 
for its Purification." 

3. "The Debt of Literature to the Monastic Movement." 

4. "The Russo-Japanese War." 

5. "The History of the Novel in England." 

6. "Lucius Junius Brutus and Marcus Junius Brutus — a 
Contrast in Character Stud^." 

The class of 1909 will next year select from the following 
subjects: 

1. "The Psychology of Commerce." 

2. "The Pharisees and Saducees: Their real meaning in 
Jewish History." 

3. "The Congo Free State." 

4. "Walter Scott, The Father of the Historical Novel." 

5. "Greek Influence in Roman Education." 

6. "The French Influence on the Life and Language of Eng- 
land after the Norman Conquest." 

7. "Beneficial Bacteria." 

8. "Euclid: His Effect on Modern Mathematics." 

The Ethics Prizes. — Two prizes, of ten and five dollars re- 
spectively, are offered by friends of the University to two mem- 
bers of the Senior Class who excel in the study of Ethics. These 
prizes are awarded on Commencement Day. 

The First Year Greek Prizes. — Through the efforts of the 
head of the Greek Department, prizes are given each year to the 
three students who rank highest in the Class in Greek. These 
prizes are respectively ten dollars, five dollars, and the Greek 
text books used in the Freshman Class of the following year. 

The Freshman Latin Prizes. — The First National Bank of 
Ottawa gives a first prize of ten dollars, and Mr. C. L. Becker, 
a citizen of Ottawa, a second prize, consisting of the Latin text 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



43 



books used in the Sophomore Class of the following year, to the 
Freshmen who rank respectively first and second in the Latin 
work of the year. 

The McWharf Chemistry and Physics Prize Medals. — Dr. J. 

M. McWharf, as a memorial to his son Raymond, offers a gold 
medal to that student of the Freshman Class whose standing in 
Chemistry for the year is highest, and another to that member 
of the Sophomore Class who attains the highest grade in Phy- 
sics. These prizes are awarded on Commencement Day. 

The Atkinson Rhetorical Prize. — At the Commencement of 
1903, it was announced that Mrs. Margaret Atkinson, a warm 
friend and supporter of the University throughout its history, 
would give, beginning with 1904, a prize of twenty-five dollars to 
that members of the graduating class each year, who has made 
the best grades in rhetorical work during the four years of the 
college course. Soon after making this offer, Mrs. Atkinson was 
called to her eternal reward, but her son, Mr. James Northrup 
Atkinson, (A. B., 1898, B. S., 1900, A. M., 1903), appreciating the 
spirit which prompted the offer mentioned, and anxious to carry 
out the wishes of his mother, generously volunteered to continue 
the prize as a memorial, and began to award the prize in 1904. 



44 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



PART IV. 



THE SCHOOLS OF THE UNIVERSITY AND THEIR 
ORGANIZATION. 



To meet the many-fold demands for instruction, as well as 
for the purposes of better classification, the University is or- 
ganized into five distinct schools, each of which offers courses 
of instruction leading to diplomas, degrees, and certificates ap- 
propriate to the work included in its various groups. The five 
schools include The College of Liberal Arts, The Academy, The 
Normal School, The School of Fine Arts, and The Commercial 
School. The courses of these five schools are almost entirely 
separate and distinct from each other, as are also in large part 
the teaching faculties, and to some extent the equipments. 

We present herewith a complete statement of the courses, 
entrance requirements, equipment, faculties, degrees and di- 
plimas of each of the five schools, as they are at the present time 
being carried on. The University reserves, however, at all times 
the right, for good reason to change, either by increase or de- 
crease, any of the facilities outlined. All changes made, how- 
ever, will in so far as it is at all possible, be in the direction of 
better service to our constituency . 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



45 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

OF 

OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



Entrance Requirements, 
The Degrees and Courses, 
The Groups of Departments, 
The College Instruction in Detail. 



1906-1907. 



46 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



INTRODUCTORY. 

The College of Liberal Arts aims to supply a series of 
courses which by their breadth and character shall aid in the 
development of that generous and well rounded manhood and 
womanhood which is the ideal of Christian thought. The suc- 
cessful man is a pyramid, standing, not on its apex, but on the 
foundation of a broad and liberal culture. 

For the purpose of meeting as fully as possible the varied 
bent and necessities of the student, five distinct groups of 
courses have been arranged, each of which consists of studies 
partly prescribed, and partly elective. Each of these groups 
leads to a degree, and each requires four years of residence work 
for completion. The best thought of a faculty of conservative 
specialists has gone into the framing of these groups, and they 
are offered to the young men and women of Kansas and of the 
contiguous territory with full confidence in the worth and merit 
of the system outlined. 

A. ENTRANCE TO THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

The unit course on which the entrance requirement of the 
College of Liberal Arts is based consists of one subject pursued 
for thirty-five weeks in a good high school or academy, with 
recitation periods aggregating each week not less than 200 min- 
utest For every minute of class recitation displaced by labora- 
tory work, allow two minutes of laboratory work.)) 

Fifteen units are required for unconditional entrance into 
The College of Liberal Arts, and these fifteen units must be se- 
lected from the schedule herewith presented. As will be noted. 

the units are in part elective, and in larger 
ENTRANCE part required. The schedule arranges the 

REQUIREMENT, subjects from which the entrance units must 
be chosen into six groups and indicates how 
many units from each group must be included in the fifteen pre- 
sented for entrance. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



47 



THE SCHEDULE OF ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS TO THE 
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



GROUP I. 
English. 



English, four units. 



j Three units 
/ required. 



are 



GROUP II.. 
Foreign 
Languages. 



GROUP III 
History. 



Latin, four units. 
Greek, three units. 
German, three units. 
French, three units. 



f Of these, three 
| units are required, 
*[ which must be, 
| either in Latin or 
l^in German. 



f Greek and Roman, one f 
| unit. 

| Mediaeval and Modern, | 
<j one unit. •{ One unit required. 

| English, one unit. 
| American, one unit. 
^Economics, one unit. L 



GROUP IV... 
Mathematics. 



f Elementary algebra, one f 

j and one-half units. 
Plane geometry, one unit. t?i~™~«*o,.„ 
SoU g!o W one-haU ^f^ane'l 

<{ unit. «{ 

| Plane trigonometry, one- I 

I half unit. 
Advanced algebra, one-half | 

t unit. t 



otnetry are requir- 
ed. 



GROUP V. 
Physical 
Science. 



GROUP VI 
Biological 
Science. 



f Physical geography 
J unit. 

1 Physics, one unit. 
[ Chemistry, one unit. 

. J Botany, one unit. 
1 Zoology, one unit. 



one f 

J One unit 
] quired. 



is re- 



One unit is re- 
quired. 



As observed above, to secure unconditional admission to 
the Freshman class of the College the candidate must offer fif- 
teen units from the foregoing list of accredited preparatory sub- 
jects. Of these fifteen units, eleven and one-half are prescribed 
by group; the remaining three and one-half units may be chosen 
without restriction. 



48 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Students may enter the college either on certificate or by 
examination in one or more of the fifteen units above named. In 
general all graduates from high schools and academies that have 
by the quality and scope of their work gained 
ADMISSION. the approval of the State Examiner will be ad- 
mitted on the presentation of a ceritficate prop- 
erly signed by the head of the school. Blank certificates are sent 
to all approved schools each year, or they may be had on appli- 
cation to the President of Ottawa University. 

Students coming from schools which for any reason have not 
yet secured full recognition, are advised to present careful state- 
ments of the work done in their preparatory course, including 
grade, quantity and scope of work, note-books and texts used. 
Each case will be decided on its merits. Examinations will be 
required only in cases in which it is not clear that the work pre- 
sented is in every way of standard quality. 

Students who present less than fifteen units of preparatory 
work, may, if they do not lack more than three units, enter the 
Freshman class conditionally. Students who lack more than 
three units will be registered as special stu- 
CONDITIONAL dents (See page 64), and will continue to be 
ADMISSION. so registered until all the deficiencies have 
been made up. Freshmen who are condi- 
tioned on their entrance requirements must remove the condi- 
tions by the opening of the first semester of their Sophomore 
year. In case a student offers for entrance fifteen units selected 
from the table above, but lacks in any of the groups not to exceed 
one of the units which are required, opportunity will be given 
him to take the missing courses and to secure proper college 
credit for them. 

No college credit will be given for work done in preparatory 
schools except on examination, and then sub- 
ADVANCED ject to the judgment of the head of the de- 
STANDING. partment to which the work belongs. 

Every request for advanced standing made by 
students from other colleges will be treated by the faculty on 
its own merits. The applicant will be required to present a cer- 
tificate of honorable dismissal from the school last attended, and 
must place before the committee on advanced standing his list 
of grades and a marked catalog describing the courses for which 
he wishes credit. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



49 



THE ADMISSION UNITS IN DETAIL. 
I. ENGLISH. Three Units Required. 

I. — Each candidate for degrees will be required to write a 
paragraph or two on each of the several topics chosen by him 
from a considerable number set before him on the examination 
paper. 

The topics will be drawn from the following works: 

1906. Shakspere's The Merchant of Venice, and Macbeth; 
The Sir Roger de Coverly Papers in The Spectator; Irving's 
Life of Goldsmith; Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner; Scott's 
Ivanhoe and The Lady of the Lake; Tennyson's Gareth and 
Lynette; Lancelot and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur; Lo- 
well's The Vision of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas Marner. 

The candidate is expected to read intelligently all the books 
prescribed. He should read them as he reads other books; 
he is expected, not to know them minutely, but to have freshly 
in mind their most important parts. In every case, knowledge 
of the book will be regarded as less important than ability to 
write clear and idiomatic English. 

2. — A certain number of books are prescribed for careful 
study. This part of the examination will be upon subject mat- 
ter, literary form, and logical structure, and will also test the 
candidate's ability to express his knowledge with clearness and 
accuracy. 

The books prescribed for this part of the examination are: 

1906. Shakspere's Julius Caesar; Milton's Lycidias, Comus, 
L' Allegro, and II Penseroso; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with 
America; Macaulay's Essay on Addison and Life of Johnson. 

3. — The candidate will be expected to be able to write En- 
glish that is not notably defective in point of spelling, punctua- 
tion, idiom, or division into paragraphs; to answer questions in 
English Grammar, and to be somewhat familiar with the lives 
and works of the prominent writers in English literature. 

II. HISTORY. One Unit Required of all Candidates. 

1. — Ancient History; One unit. Oriental, Greek and Roman 
history. The student will be expected to show a satisfactory 
grasp of the main facts in the various important elements in 
pre-Christian history. The course must represent one full year 
of study. 

2. — Mediaeval and Modern History; One unit. The leading 
events of the period from 250 A. D. to the present day. One full 
year of time should be spent on the subject, as outlined in the 
State High School Manual. 



50 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



3. — American History; One unit. A standard high school 
course of one year, based on a text and accompanied by parallel 
reading will be expected if this unit is presented for entrance. 

4. — English History; One unit. Reasonable familiarity with 
the growth and development of England, and of the causes which 
have led to her greatness. A full year's course in an accepted 
high school will be expected if this unit is presented for entrance. 

III. LATIN. Three Units Required Unless German is 
Offered Instead. 

Either three or four of the units described below may be of- 
fered for entrance, each unit to be given a full year. If three 
units are offered, it is preferred that they be 1, 2, and 3. Stud- 
ents intending to pursue the study of Latin after entering college 
will find it more satisfactory to complete the four entrance units 
in the preparatory school, in case there is opportunity to do so. 
Candidates for the degrees of A. B., or Ph. B., will be required to 
have made up or to be making up the fourth entrance unit be- 
fore taking any of the more advanced Latin courses. College 
credit to the amount of six semester hours, will be given to reg 
ular freshmen who take the fourth unit in the academy of the 
University. Candidates' certificates should indicate specifically 
the amount and character of their work in Latin composition. 
Those offering less than the equivalent of one recitation period 
per week of composition for each unit offered will be examined 
in the subject, and if found deficient will be required to do sup- 
plementary work in Latin composition for which no college credit 
will be given. 

1. — The Elements of Latin: Mastery of declension and con- 
jugation; accurate and ready pronunciation; familiarity with the 
more usual verb and noun constructions; a vocabulary of at least 
four hundred words of those most frequently used by Caesar; 
practice in translating and reading simple connected Latin. 

2. — Caesar and Latin Composition. The first four books of 
Caesar's Gallic War, or selections of equal extent from the sev- 
en books. In place of one book of Caesar an equivalent amount 
of Nepos or Viri Romae will be accepted. The student should 
be able to write simple Latin sentences involving the words and 
constructions habitually employed by Caesar. 

3. — Cicero's Orations and Latin Composition. The orations 
may be those usually read, the four against Catiline, the one for 
the Manilian Law, and the one for the poet Archias. In place of 
the last mentioned, Sallust's Catiline or an equivalent amount of 
Cicero's Letters will be accepted. In comparison with the com- 
position of the previous year somewhat more complex sentences, 
using a great variety particularly of verb construction, should be 
written. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



51 



4. — Vergil's Aeneid and Latin Composition. Books I-VI of 
the Aeneid; practice in the rhythmical and intelligent reading of 
the text; an understanding of the mythological and legendary 
references and the rhetorical and linguistic characteristics of 
the poem; appropriate diction in translation. The Latin com- 
position during this year may well be in connection with a sys 
tematic review of syntax. 

IV. GREEK. One Unit Required of Classical Students. 

All students who register in group I as candidates for the 
Arts degree will be required to present grades for one full year 
of work in Greek, covering the following ground: 

1. — Mastery of the entire inflectional system, with an ability 
to analyze at sight any regular verb form. 

2. — Familiarity with the regular constructions of Attic prose 
with special reference to conditional and purpose clauses. Good- 
win's Greek Grammer is preferred. 

3. — One book of Xenophon's Anabasis. 

4. — Ability to translate into Greek passages of moderate dif- 
ficulty. 

No credits in Greek are finally accepted until the student 
presenting them shall show himself, by his class-record at this 
University, fully capable of carrying the work here required. 
Any student entering Ottawa University with credits in Greek, 
who shall fail to pass creditably the first term of Greek to which 
his credentials admit him, will forfeit his credits and be required 
to take an entrance examination on all work for which he de- 
sires credit. 

Students who are deficient in Greek, but who present 15 units 
of entrance credits and desire to register for the Arts degree, 
may make up the unit of Greek, and will be given full elective 
college credit for the course. Of a class of 30 beginners in 1905, 
three-fourths were Freshmen. 

V. GERMAN. One or More Units (Three units may be of- 
fered in place of Latin.) 

One unit of entrance German is required of all students who 
register as candidates for the philosophical or the science de- 
gree. Students who do not present the required entrance unit 
will be allowed to do the work in the Academy, and will be given 
satisfactory credit for it. 

The unit involves careful mastery of the declensional and 
conjugational machinery, accurate pronunciation, ability to un- 
derstand simple German conversation and to write simple Ger- 
man compositions. In addition to this the student should read 
not less than 150 pages of simple text, though more stress wiU 



52 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



be laid on the mastery of the language than on the mechanical 
l eading of a given amount of text. 

VI. THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES. One Unit Required. 

1. — Physiography. One unit. The course should include a 
general description of the earth, and of the conventional meth- 
ods of representing its surface; a study of the oceans, of the 
lands, and of the atmosphere, together with the laws which gov- 
ern the changes which, are taking place at the present time. It 
is recommended that field work be combined with the study of 
some standard text. 

2. — Physics. One unit. The work in Physics should include 
the careful study of a text such as Carhart and Chute's High 
School Physics, and a series of laboratory experiments conduct- 
ed under the supervision of the teacher. At least thirty-five ex- 
periments should be selected from some standard series, and be 
reported in a laboratory note book. 

3. — Chemistry. One unit. The unit of Chemistry, if present- 
ed, must include all the subjects included in course I of Ottawa 
University. The work involves an acquaintance with modern 
theories of Chemical science, and a familiarity with the practi- 
cal application of these theories and laws in the arts. The study 
of a text must be accomplished by generous laboratory experi- 
mentation — from two-fifths to one-half of the time given to the 
course should be spent in such experimentation. 

VII. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE. One Unit Required. 

The entrance unit in biological science may be either Botany 
or Zoology. In either case the work will be expected to cover 
one full year of study, with ample laboratory and field work to 
supplement the text book and class discussions. Students tak- 
ing entrance examinations in these or the physical sciences, will 
be required to present note books covering the laboratory work 
done, in order to secure credit. Students who did not do labora- 
tory work will be required to make it up before they receive full 
entrance credit. 

VIII.— MATHEMATICS. Two and One-Half Units Required. 

1. — Algebra. One and one-half units required. The work 
should cover the following subjects as given in the better high 
school text-books: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, 
factoring, highest common factor, lowest common multiple, frac- 
tions, equations of the first degree, involution, evolution, theory 
of exponents, radicals, and quadratic equations. 

The work requires daily recitations for one and a half school 
years. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



53 



2. — Plane Geometry. One unit required. The work should cov- 
er figures formed by straight lines, the circle, similar figures, 
areas, polygons, symmetry, with problems of construction and 
original exercises. A daily recitation for an entire school year 
should be devoted to this work. 

3. — Solid Geometry. One-half unit, optional for entrance. Spe- 
cial attention should be given to the geometry of the sphere. 
The subject requires a daily recitation for one-half school year. 
Students who do not present Solid Geometry as one of their en- 
trance subjects, will be required to take it in connection with 
their Freshman work. 

THE LIST OF ACCREDITED SCHOOLS. 

The courses of the following schools have been examined by 
the state examiner, and found either wholly or partly adequate 
for entrance to the College of Liberal Arts, and to the School of 
Fine Arts of Ottawa University. 

All students who present properly executed certificates from 
the schools in the list below will receive full credit for all work 
so certified. If fifteen units are certified, the student will be ad- 
mitted unconditionally. If less than fifteen units are certified, 
the student will be admitted conditionally, and the missing sub- 
jects may be made up by examination or otherwise. 

Schools included in the second list, have not incorporated 
all of the required units into their courses, and students from 
those schools will be given an opportunity to make up the lack- 
ing units in the Academy. 

Candidates from schools not included in either of the lists 
below, are invited to submit a careful statement of the work 
which they have done, giving as many of the facts pertaining to 
the work as may be accessible. Full credit will be given for 
all work which appears satisfactory, and examination required 
only on subjects which have not been done in a thoroughly sat- 
isfactory manner. 

I.— SCHOOLS FULLY ACCREDITED. 

Name of School. Superintendent. Principal. 

Abilene W. B. Hall N. U. Spangler 

Argentine H. P. Butcher, A. B Minnie J. Oliverson, A. B. 

Arkansas City L. W. Mayberry, A. B R. S. Whitelaw 

Atchison Co., 

Effingham j. w. Wilson, A. B. 

Beloit J. O. Hall, A. B J. H. Adams, A. B. 

Clay Co., 

Clay Center S. A. Bardwell 

Concordia A. B. Carney Martha Whitney, A. B. 

Goffeyville W. M. Sinclair H. F. Dwelle 



54 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Name of School. Superintendent. Principal. 

Chase Co., 

Cottonwood Falls B. F. Martin 

Decatur Co., 

Oberlin H. Q. Banta, A. M. 

Dickinson Co., 

Chapman Homer S. Myers, A. M. 

Ellsworth E. T. Fairchild L. H. Beall, A. B. 

Emporia L. A. Lowther, A. B W. L. Holtz, A. B. 

Eureka B. E. Lewis, A. B W. A. Bailey 

Ft. Scott D. M. Bowen, A. B F. M. Hammitt, A. M. 

Galena Leslie T. Huffman Ray E. Merwin, A. M. 

Garnett C. H. Oman, A. B Geo. H. Marshall 

Great Bend C. A. Strong W. L. Bowersox 

Holton E. L. Holton, A. B .C. D. Ise, A. B. 

Hutchinson R. R. Price, A. M Chas. A. Wagner, A. B. 

Halstead C. O. Smith Orel McCroskey, A. B. 

Hiawatha Geo. G. Pinney, A. B A. C. Andrews, A. B. 

Iola Miss C. A. Mitchell L. H. Wishard 

Junction City W. S. Heusner, A. M R. F. Mills, A. B. 

Kan. City, Kan M. E. Pearson, B. D W. C. McCroskey, A. B. 

Labette Co., 

Altamont W. M. Keyser, A. B. 

Larned W. S. Robb, A. B Ora Mower, A. B. 

Lawrence F. P. Smith, A. M F. H. Olney, A. B. 

Leavenworth G. W. Kendrick W. A. Evans 

Minneapolis A. F. Senter, B. S D. O. Smith, B. S. 

McPherson C. W. Kline, A. B Clinton Wright 

Lewis Academy, 

Wichita J. M. Nay lor, A. M. 

Marysville C. B. Myers, A. B T. L. Eyerly, A. B. 

Montgomery Co., 

Independence S. N. Nees, B. S. 

Newton D. F. Shirk, A. B O. J. Silverwood, A. B. 

Norton Co., 

Norton H. H. Gerardy 

Olathe R. L. Parker, A. B G. M. Husser, Ph. B. 

Ottawa A. L. Bell, Ph. B H. P. Study, A. B. 

Paola E. D. George, A. B F. K. Fergerson, B. S. 

Parsons J. A. Higdon, A. M Louise M. Schaub 

Pittsburg A. H. Bushey J. E. Crawford 

Rosedale Geo. E. Rose, B. D Anna D. White, A. B. 

Reno Co., 

Nickerson E. B. Smith, A. M. 

Southern Kan. Aca- 
demy, Eureka W. E. Fraught, B. S. 

Salina G. R. Crissman, A. B John Lofty, A. B. 

Seneca C. C. Starr, B. S Pearl McCurdy, B. S. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



55 



Name of School. 



Superintendent. 



Principal. 



St. John Military, 
Salina 



R. H. Mize, A. B. 



Smith Center T. H. Hooper, A. B D. H. Rose, A. B. 

Sumner Co., 



Sterling G. L. Seeley, A. B Jeanette Inches, Ph. B. 

Sedgwick R. A. Hampshire, M. S...Adaline Finn 

Thomas Co., 

Colby W. E. Ray, A. M. 

Topeka L. D. Whittemore, A. M..H. L. Miller, A. B. 

Washington W. D. Vincent, A. B C. H. Myers, A. B. 

Wichita R. F. Knight E. H. Ellsworth, A. M. 

Winfield H. W. Spindler, A. M C. H. Rhodes, A. M. 

Anthony J. H. Clement, A. B Jennie G. Fones, A. B. 

Atchison N. T. Veatch A. H. Speer, A. B. 

Burlingame C. A. Deardorff Grace Bringham, A. B. 

Burlington W. A. Stacey, B. S Myrtle Collins, A. B. 

Chanute J. H. Adams J. A. Cannan 

Crawford Co., 

Cherokee W. S. Pate 

Council Grove A. M. Thoroman Irene Pemberton, A. B. 

Cherryvale A. J. Lovette, A. B Bennett Grove 

Clyde C M. Ware Emma Palmer, A. B. 

ElDorado Warren Baker J. A. Hall, A. B. 

(Jove Co., 

Gove S. E. Lee 

Lyons T. A. Edgerton R. G. Henderson 

Osage City E. C. Hackney L. E. Swenson 

Osawatomie C. L. Williams May E. Williams, A. B. 

Peabody W. D. Ross, A. M Alinthe Spilman, A. B. 

Sheridan Co., 

Hoxie R. G. Mueller, A. B. 

Wamego A. J. Beatty, B. S Grace Eaton, A. B. 

Albuquerque, N. M J. E. Clark J. A. Miller, B. P. 

Beaverhead Co., 

Dillon, Mont L. R. Foote, B. L. 

El Reno, Okla F. N. Howell Warren Ingold, A. B. 

Joplin, Mo W. P. Roberts S. A. Baker 

Kansas City, Mo., 

Manual Training J. M. Greenwood, Ph. D..E. D. Phillips, Ph. M. 

Kansas City, Mo., 

Central J. M. Greenwood. Ph. D..I. I. Cammack 

Kansas City, Mo., 

Westport J. M. Greenwood, Ph. D..S. A. Underwood 

Kemper Military Aca 

demy, Boonville, Mo T. A. Johnston, A. M. 

La Junta, Colo O. J. Blakely, Ph. D. 



Wellington 



T. W. Butcher, A. M. 



5G 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Name of School. Superintendent. Principal. 

Oklahoma City, Okla.. E. S. Vaught, B. S J. B. Taylor 

Prosso Prep. School, 

Kansas City, Mo J. P. Richardson, A. B. 

St. Joseph, Mo J. A. Whitford R. H. Jordan, A. B. 

Warrensburg, Mo W. E. Morrow, B. P Edward Beatty, B. P. 

Wentworth Military, 

Lexington, Mo S. Sellers, A. M. 

Western Military, 

Upper Alton, 111 Albert M. Jackson 



II.— SCHOOLS NOT FULLY ACCREDITED. 
Name of School. Superintendent. Principal. 



Augusta W. F. Rice, A. B Carmie Wolfe, A. B. 

Burrton Robt. Halbert, Ph. B... Ida Shive, A. B. 

Belleplaine C. H. Landrum, A. B... Lulu Grosh, A. B. 

Blue Mound A. D. Hiatt, A. B Ellen Dingus, B. S. 

Cawker City A. P. Gregory, B. S A. M. McKechnie 

Clifton G. B. Buikstra, A. B.. . . W. A. Cain 

Carbondale Charles Kelly Grace Lyon 

Centralia A. W. Jarrett Carrie Beery, A. B. 

Delphos M. C. Shaible, B. S Inez Dickinson, B. P. 

Dodge City C. A. Smith, A. B Roger Dean, A. B. 

Douglass J. H. Gibson Etta Marshall 

Frankfort M. G. Kirkpatrick Harriet Landers 

Fredonia I L. Garrison, B. S H. M. Starns 

Florence C. E. St. John Bertha Van Hove 

Garden City E. F. Ewing, A. B Mae Cathcart, Ph. B. 

Girard H. W. Shideler, A. B... Lillian Bell, A. B. 

Hays R. T. Madden, A. B Miss A. Foster 

Herington W. W. Jones Lavonia Donica 

Horton W. W. Wood, A. B w. M. Blair, A. B. 

Harper E. E. Sluss, B. S Margaret Dean 

Howard Harley I. French Hallie Paynter 

Humboldt J E. Cook A. I. Decker 

Kingman A. W. Ault, A. B Margaret Benedix 

Kinsley D. A. Baugher D. A. Baugher 

Lyndon L. S. Runnels Margaret Kelly, A. B. 

Lane Co., 

Dighton Herman Gillette, A. B. 

LaCygne J. E. Chamberlain Mary E. Smith, Ph, B. 

Marion H. H. Van Fleet, A. B. Clara Morris 

Mankato F. W. Simmonds, M. S. S. J. Butts, A. M. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



57 



Name of School. Superintendent. Principal. 

Moline J. L. Shearer, B. D Delia Bates 

Neodesha J. M. Steffen G. F. Collins 

Nortonville : E. H. McMath, A. B.. Lena McConnell, A. B. 

Overbrook C. H. Hepworth, Ph. B. Helen Ingham, A. B. 

Osborne B. K. Farrar, B. S Kate Clark, A. B. 

Phillipsburg T. O. Ramsey, A. B.... Olive Thomas 

Pleasanton John Groendyke, B. S.. Edith Bowers, A. B. 

Pratt W. Falkenrich, A. B Irene Crawford, A. B. 

Plainville C. E. Rarick, A. B Myrtle Pyder 

St. John C. M. Hilleary J. H. Byers, A. B. 

Sabetha G. T. Beach, A. M Susie Guild, A. B. 

Scott Co., 

Scott City R. Bullimore 

Stafford A. L. Stickel, A. M... Henrietta Hall 

Stockton J. F. Smith, B. S Mrs. S. K. Smith, B. S. 

Scranton John Linn John Linn 

Sherman Co., 

Goodland S. V. Mallory, B. S. 

Trego Co., 

Wakeeney J. H. Niesley 

Valley Falls S. D. Dice Maude Myers 

Waverly G. R. Tilford Jessie A. Fear, Ph. B. 

Russell J. N. Banks, A. M Alden Dannevik 



III.— SCHOOLS OFFERING SOME APPROVED COURSES. 

Name of School. Principal. 

Attica W. L. Dunbar 

Beattie C. Kraemer 

Blue Rapids A. J. Clark, A. B. 

Boling Harriet Woodward 

Buffalo H. E. Clewell 

Burroak F. Eaton 

Caldwell D. C. Porter 

Colony J. B. White 

Corning « H. W. Roberts 

Erie F. L. Pinet 

Ellis B. E. Ford 

Gas City H. D. Ramsey 

Glasco Inez Chapman, A. B. 

Glen Elder R. L. Hamilton 

Greenleaf A. P. Warrington 



58 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Name of School. Principal. 

Gypsum J. E. Coe 

Goff C. A. Richard, A. B. 

Havens ville P. R. Hamm 

Hill City A. E. Lunceford 

Hartford Anna H. Brogan 

Hillsboro J. W. Shideler 

Kincaid T. E. Osborn 

LaHarpe A. J. Baker 

Louisburg Floyd B. Lee 

Lansing J. B. Kelsey 

Logan W. R. Arthur, A. B. 

Lecompton J. W. Murphy, A. B. 

Leon Jas. I. Knott 

Linwood E. E. Heath 

LeRoy C. T. Sherwood 

Maplehill J. H. Houston 

Marquette V. H. Moon 

Moran G. E. Jones 

Oskaloosa W. A. Anderson 

Quenemo E. L. Heilman 

Reading P. E. Robinson 

Sylvan Grove J. A. Fleming 

Syracuse H. E. Walter 

Springhill C. H. Brooks 

Tonganoxie F. Brackett 

Westmoreland F. W. Comfort 

Wetmore L. M. Duvall 

Wilson .H. Coover 

Williamsburg J. F. Lyon 

Weir City R. Rankin 

Yates Center F. M. Patterson 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



59 



B. THE DEGREES AND COURSES LEADING TO THEM. 

As above noted, the College offers five groups of courses, 
leading to the Baccalaureate degrees of Arts, Philosophy, and 
Science. The minimum requirement for each of these degrees 

consists of four years of residence 
THE BACCALAUREATE study at this University or at some 
DEGREES. other school of equal rank. Not less 

than one year, and that the last, 
must be spent in residence at this school, and the candidate must 
present not less than 140 Semester hours of credit to be entitled 
to his degree. No candidate for a degree may in any semester 
carry less than sixteen hours of work. 

Students who are conditioned in not to exceed three units 
and who have earned less than 35 hours of college credit, will 
be ranked as Freshmen. Students who have passed all condi- 
tions, and who have earned 35, but less than 70 hours 
CLASS of credit, are ranked as Sophomores. In like manner 
RANK. those who have earned 70 hours or more, and less 
than 105 hours of credit are classed as Juniors, while 
those who have earned 105 hours or more, and less than 140 
hours of credit, are ranked as Seniors, and are entitled at the 
close of their fourth year of residence study to the Baccalaureate 
degree corresponding to the group of courses which they have 
selected. 

The Master's Degree will be conferred on every graduate 
of three years' standing who shall pursue a systematic course of 
study under the direction of the college faculty, and who shall 
pass a satisfactory examination thereon. The 
THE MASTER'S degree is also conferred on graduates of the 
DEGREE. College who have completed a three years' 

professional course. After June 1909, no 
Master's Degree will be conferred except on written or oral ex- 
amination based on resident study or its equivalent. 

Every candidate for a Baccalaureate Degree, who, in addi- 
tion to the 140 hours required in the under-graduate course, shall 
have earned 30 hours of advance credit, will be granted a Mas- 
ter's Degree, provided: 

I. That all extra work to be counted toward the higher 
degree must be passed at a grade of "B" or higher. 

II. That twenty of the thirty hours must be taken in some 
one of the groups of instruction as the major subject, and ten 
hours shall be arranged for in some other department as a minor. 
For the groups see pages 64 and 65. 

III. That no course may be counted toward a Master's De- 
gree unless it has been approved as such by the head of the de- 
partment concerned, and no required courses may be counted 
for Master's credit. 



60 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



IV. That the Master's Degree will be awarded not earlier 
than one year after the conferring of the Baccalaureate Degree, 
and then only on the presentation of a thesis giving evidence of 
wide, careful, and thoroughly digested reading. 

Note: A diploma fee of Five Dollars will be required for 
every Master's Degree conferred. 



THE GROUPS LEADING TO DEGREES IN THE COLLEGE. 

I. THE CLASSICAL GROUP. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
The Classical group represents the standard classical 
course, and includes both of the classical languages. It is 
recommended for ministerial candidates and for all students who 
desire to lay special stress on literature and the widest gen- 
eral culture. 

FRESHMAN. 



Fall Semester. 

Mathematics... (H 1 1)4 

Chemistry (G 1 1)4 

Rhetoric (D 1)2 

Latin (E 1 1)3 

Greek (E 2 1)5 



Spring Semester. 

Mathematics.... (H 1 11)4 

Rhetoric (D 11)4 

Latin (E 1 II a & b)4 

Greek (E 2 II & 111)5 



SOPHOMORE. 

German (F 2 la)5 German (F 2 I b) 5 

History (C 1)3 Latin (E 1 IVa&b)4 

Latin (E 1 111)3 Greek (E 2 XIV)4 

Greek ...(E 2 XVII)3 History (C 11)3 

Electives to make a total in each Semester of 18 hours. 

JUNIOR. 

Psychology (A 1 1)5 Logic (A 1 11)3 

Geology (G 1 XXI)5 

Greek (E 2 XVI 1)3 

Electives to make a total in each Semester of 18 hours. 

SENIOR. 

Pol. Econ (CIX)3 Sociology (C X)3 

Ethics (A 1 111)2 Christ. Evid. . . .(A 1 IV) 3 

Electives to make a total in each Semester of 16 hours. 

II. THE PHILOSOPHICAL GROUP. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

The Philosophical group includes but one of the classical 
languages and gives greater attention to the Modern Languages. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



61 



It aims to meet the need of students who wish to study liter- 
ature, but who do not care to pursue both of the classical 
languages. 

FRESHMAN. 
Fall Semester. Spring Semester. 

Mathematics ( H 1 1)4 Mathematics ... ( H 1 11)4 

Chemistry (G 1 1)4 Rhetoric (D 11)4 

Rhetoric (D 1)2 Latin (E* lla&b)4 

Latin (E 1 1)3 German (F 2 111)5 

German (F 2 11)5 

SOPHOMORE. 

French (F 1 Ia)5 French (F 1 lb)5 

History (C 1)3 History (C 11)3 

Latin (E 1 111)3 Latin (E 1 IVa&b)4 

Biology (G 2 1)4 Physics (G 1 Xl)4 

Electives to make a total in each Semester of 18 hours. 
JUNIOR. 

Psychology (A 1 1)5 Physiology (G 2 IX)3 

Geology (G 1 XXI)5 Logic (A 1 11)3 

Electives to make a total in each Semester of 18 hours. 

SENIOR. 

Pol. Econ (C IX)3 Sociology (C X)3 

Ethics (A 1 111)2 Christ. Evid (A 1 IV)3 

Electives to make a total in each Semester of 16 hours. 

III. THE SCIENCE GROUP. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

The Science group lays special stress on the natural sciences 
and is intended to present a general survey of the scientific 
field. Language becomes subsidiary, and scientific study be- 
comes primary. The group is a general culture group. 

FRESHMAN. 
Fall Semester. Spring Semester. 

Mathematics... (H 1 1)4 Mathematics... (H 1 11)4 

Chemistry (G 1 1)4 Rhetoric (D 11)4 

Rhetoric (D 1)2 Chemistry (G* 11)5 

Biology (G 2 1)4 German (F 2 111)5 

German (F 2 11)5 

SOPHOMORE. 

Mathematics... (H 1 111)4 Mathematics... (H 1 IV)4 

Zoology (G 2 IV)4 Zoology (G 2 V)4 

History (C 1)3 History (C 11)3 

Chemistry (G 1 111)4 Chemistry (G 1 IV)4 

Histology (G 2 VN)4 Physics (G 1 Xl)4 



62 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



JUNIOR. 

Psychology (A 1 1)5 Logic (A 1 11)3 

Geology (G 1 XXI)5 Physiology (G 2 IX)3 

Electives to make a total in each Semester of 18 hours. 

SENIOR. 

Pol. Econ (C IX) 3 Sociology (C X)3 

Ethics (A 1 111)2 Christ. Evid-.-.CA 1 IV)3 

Electives to make a total in each Semester of 16 hours. 

IV. THE PRE-ENGI NEE RING GROUP. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

The Pre-engineering group is specially planned to meet 
the need of that growing class of students who desire a col- 
lege course, but who wish to unite a college and an engineer- 
ing course. Mathematics and Physical Science are the promi- 
nent elements, and students who complete this course may ex- 
pect to complete an engineering course in two years. 



FRESHMAN. 



Fall Semester. 

Mathematics... (H 1 1)4 

Mech. Draw (H 2 1)3 

Rhetoric (D 1)2 

Chemistry (G 1 1)4 

German (F 2 11)5 



Spring Semester. 

Mathematics... (H 1 11)4 

Mech. Draw (H 2 11)2 

Rhetoric (D 11)4 

Chemistry (G 1 11)5 

German (F 2 111)5 



SOPHOMORE. 



Mathematics... (H 1 111)4 
Mathematics... (H 1 VI 1)2 
Mathematics... (H 1 IX) 3 

Mech. Draw (H 2 111)4 

Chemistry (G 1 111)4 



Mathematics... (H 1 IV)4 
Mathematics... (H 1 VIII)2 
Mathematics... (H 1 X)3 
Mech. Draw... (H 2 IV)2 

Chemistry (G 1 IV)4 

Physics (G 1 Xl)4 



Mathematics... (H 1 V)4 

Physics (G 1 Xll)4 

Geology (G 1 XXI)5 

Psychology (A 1 1)5 



JUNIOR. 



Geology (G 1 XXII)4 

Logic (A 1 11)3 

History Elective 3 hours. 
Other Electives 8 hours. 



Pol. Econ (C IX) 3 

Ethics (A 1 111)2 

Biology (G 2 1)4 

French (F 1 la) 5 



SENIOR. 

Sociology (C X)3 

Christ. Evid... (A 1 IV)3 
French (F l 1b) 5 



Electives to make a total in each Semester of 16 hours. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



63 



V. THE PRE-MEDICAL GROUP. 

A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

The Pre-medical course is planned to enable students to 
complete the college and medical course in six years. Special 
emphasis is laid on Biological Science, and on those subjects 
which may be expected to bear on the career of medical men. 

FRESHMAN. 
Fall Semester. Spring Semester. 

Mathematics... (H 1 1)4 Mathematics... (H 1 11)4 

Rhetoric (D 1)2 Rhetoric (D 11)4 

Chemistry (G 1 1)4 Chemistry (G 1 11)5 

Biology (G 2 1)4 A Foreign Language, 5 

A Foreign Language, 5 

SOPHOMORE. 

Chemistry (G 1 111)4 Chemistry (G 1 IV)4 

Zoology (G 2 IV)4 Zoology (G 2 V)4 

Histology (G 2 Vll)4 Physics (G 1 Xl)4 

History (C 1)3 History (C 11)3 

Electives to make a total in each Semester of 18 hours. 



JUNIOR. 

Comp. Anatomy (G 2 Xll)4 Physiology (G 2 IX)3 

Psychology (A 1 1)5 Logic (A 1 11)3 

Physics (G 1 XI 1)4 Cytology (G 2 VI 1 1)4 

Geology (G 1 XXI)5 Geology (G 1 XXII)4 

Elective 4 hours 

SENIOR. 

Physiology (G 2 X)2 Sociology (C X)3 

Pol. Econ (C IX)3 Christ. Evid.-.^A 1 IV)3 

Ethics (A 1 111)2 Bacteriology (G 2 XI) 2 

E L ECT I V E S.— 1 906-1 907. 

The following elective courses are offered by the faculty of 
the college. They are open to all students, subject, however, to 
such restrictions as are noted in connection with the detailed an- 
nouncements of these courses made on pages 66 to 86. 

The University reserves the right to alter, add to, or with- 
draw any of the courses herewith named. No course will be giv- 
en unless the class having elected it numbers five or more. 



Fall Semester. 

Hist, of Philosophy. . (A 1 V)3 
Philos. of Education. (A 2 1)4 

School Methods (A 2 11)4 

Biblical Literature.. (B 111)0 



Spring Semester. 

School Management (A 2 111)5 
Hist, of Education. . (A 2 IV) 5 

School Law (A 2 V)1 

Biblical Literature. . (Bl or ll)2 



64 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Biblical History (B IV)3 Biblical History.... (B V)3 

History (C V)3 History (C Vll)3 

History (C Vl)3 History (C Vlll)3 

English (D IV)5 English (D Vl)5 

Latin (E 1 V)3 Latin (E 1 Vl)3 

Latin (E 1 IX) 3 Latin (E 1 X)3 

Greek (E 2 IV) 3 Greek B. 

Greek A. Greek (E 2 XI) 3 

Greek (E 2 Xlll)3 Greek Art (E 2 XXI)3 

English Greek (E 2 XXV)2 French (F 1 lb)5 

French (F 1 la)5 French (F 1 111)5 

French (F 1 11)5 German (F 2 111)5 

German (F 2 11)5 Chemistry (G 1 11)5 

Chemistry (G 1 111)4 Chemistry (G 1 IV)4 

Chemistry (G 1 V)3 Chemistry. (G 1 VI )4 

Physics (G 1 Xll)4 Physics (G 1 Xl)4 

Geology ( G 1 XX 1 1 1 ) 4 Geology (G 1 XXII)4 

Biology (G 2 1)4 Geology (G 1 XXIV)* 

Botany (G 2 XI 1)4 Normal Science (G 1 XXV) 3 

Zoology (G 2 X)2 Botany (G 2 111)4 

Biology (G 2 VI 1)4 Zoology (G 2 V)4 

Histology (G 2 Vl)2 Cytology (G 2 Vlll)4 

Physiology (G 2 IV) 4 Physiology (G 2 IX) 3 

Comp. Anatomy (G 2 Xll)4 Bacteriology (G 2 Xl)2 

Mathematics (H 1 V)4 Mathematics (H 1 IV)4 

Mathematics (H 1 111)4 Astronomy (H 1 VI) 3 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

In order to encourage mature students who for any rea- 
son do not wish to enroll as candidates for one of the degrees, 
the University provides facilities for special courses. Students 
entering the college under this provision are permitted to en- 
roll in any class for which their previous training has fitted 
them. In each case, however, the written permission of the 
instructor under whom the work is to be done must be secured, 
and in every case the full work of the course must be done, or 
membership in the class will be forfeited. 

C. THE DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION IN THE COLLEGE. 

The instruction of the College is arranged in eight groups 
each of which is represented by a letter of the alphabet. In 
groups which include more than one department, the letter is 
followed by a small arable numeral. The specific courses are 
indicated by Roman numerals, following the group letter. 

A. — PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION. 

A 1 Philosophy. A 2 Education. 

B. — BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND HISTORY. 
C— HISTORY AND ECONOMICS. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



65 



D. — THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

E. — THE ANCIENT LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

E 1 Latin. E 2 Greek. 

F. — THE MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

F 1 French. F a German. 

G. — THE NATURAL SCIENCES. 

G 1 Physical Science. G 2 Biological Science. 

H. — MATHEMATICS AND MECHANICAL DRAWING. 

H 1 Mathematics. H 2 Mechanical Drawing. 

A. PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION. 

The courses under this group are in the main related be- 
cause of their psychological implications and they fall natur- 
ally into the two groups indicated by the composite title. 

A 1 PHILOSOPHY. 

I. — Psychology. An introductory course, consisting of lec- 
tures and class discussion based on a text. The physical basis 
of consciousness, the sensory, nervous and motor mechanism, 
the phases and phenomena of mental activity, normal and ab- 
normal states of consciousness; the psychology of the mob, of 
advertising, of salesmanship. 

Five hours, Fall Semester, required of all Juniors. The 
President. 

II. — Logic. The laws of thought, Induction, Deduction, Prop- 
ositions, Syllogisms, Fallacies. Class exercises based on a text 
book. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, required of all Juniors. Pro- 
fessor Bonebright. 

III. — Ethics. Lectures, class discussion, prescribed reading. 
The theory of ethics, theories of the moral ideal, the moral life, 
moral growth, metaphysical implications. 

Two hours, Fall Semester, required of all Seniors. The 
President. 

IV. — Christian Evidence. Lectures and text book. The met- 
aphysical basis of theism, arguments for the existence of God, 
the grounds for belief in the work and message of Christ, skep- 
ticism, atheism, the place of religious consciousness in the life 
of man. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, required of all Seniors. The 
President. 

V. — The History of Philosophy. An outline course, stating 
the problems of philosophy, and outlining the progressive de- 
velopment of philosophical theories. Lectures, text and as- 



66 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



signed reading. An introduction to the study of Modern Phil- 
osophy. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, elective for all who have fin- 
ished Psychology. The President. 

A 1 EDUCATION. 

I. — The Philosophy of Education. Definition, scope, aim 
and method of education as applied to man. The theory of 
physical education. Subjective and objective activities of mind, 
the theory of intellection, perception, imagination, memory, 
thought, activities of the will in relation to society, the ethical 
judgment, the religious instinct. The relation of education to 
psychology, logic, ethics, and religion. The historical applica- 
tion of theoretical education in specific systems. 

Class lectures, assigned reading of not less than 1,000 pages, 
reported in the form of abstracts every second week. 

Fall Semester, 1906, four hours, elective for Juniors and 
Seniors. Open to others only by special permission. Professor 
Schwegler. 

II. — School Methods. The psychological elements of edu- 
cation. The child, its development, laws of growth, and poten- 
tial powers. The teacher, his functions, opportunities, and limi- 
tations. The curriculum; its content, the relation and sequence 
of its parts, modes of development and presentation. The ideal; 
mental, moral and physical development; modes of aiding each. 

Fall Semester, 1907, five hours, elective for Juniors and Sen- 
iors of the College course only, unless by express permission of 
the instructor or of the President. Professor Schwegler. 

III. — School Management. The mechanism of the educa- 
tional process. Hygiene: child-growth, physical and mental, lim- 
its of activity, care of the body and proper use of the sense or- 
gans. The apparatus: the building, its architecture, ventilation, 
warming, lighting, sanitation, furniture. Management: disci- 
pline, curriculum, program, the act of teaching. 

Spring Semester, 1907, five hours, elective for Juniors and 
Seniors of the College course only, unless by special permission 
of the instructor or of the President. Professor Schwegler. 

Students will be required to read in connection with the two 
courses above announced not less than 2,000 pages of assigned 
literature. All reading assigned must be reported in the form 
of abstracts due each second week. 

IV. — The History of Education. A careful review of the 
progress of educational ideas and methods from the earliest 
times to the present. The subject will be treated in two divi- 
sions, the first dealing with Pre-Christian education, and the 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



67 



second covering the history of education from the time of 
Christ to the present. The two parts of the course may be 
elected separately, and a credit of 2% semester hours will be 
allowed for each half so selected. 

The work of the course will be conducted by lectures, writ- 
ten quizzes, and assigned reading on which abstracts will be 
required every second week. Not less than 2,000 pages of read- 
ing must be done by those desiring credit for the entire course, 
and not less than 1,000 pages by those desiring credit for either 
half of the work. 

Spring Semester, 1907, five hours, elective for all Juniors 
and Seniors. Professor Schwegler. 

V. — School Law. Statute laws relating to the organization, 
management, classification, and maintenance of public schools; 
the history of school law. 

Sprfng Semester, 1906, one hour, elective for Collegiate Jun- 
iors and Seniors. Professor Hill. 

Note: Under the state law of Kansas, graduates of the 
College of this University, who shall have taken in connection 
with their college course the five professional courses above 
announced, are entitled without further examination to a three- 
year state teachers' certificate entitling them to teach in any 
public school in the State of Kansas, and of some other states. 
If the holder of the certificate teaches creditably during two of 
the three years during which it is in force, he may secure at 
the close of the third year, without further examination a life 
certificate. (Laws 1899, chapter 179, section 2.) 

B. BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND HISTORY. 

One of the encouraging facts in recent tendencies is the 
deep interest which is being taken in the study of the Bible 
and its allied literature. The courses offered by this depart- 
ment are planned with a view to serving the double purpose of 
furnishing some criteria of interpretation, and of supplying such 
general historical and literary information as shall make the 
student reasonably intelligent on Biblical matters. 

I. — The Bible. Its history, authorship, manuscripts, litera- 
ary forms, and historical sidelights. Lectures and assigned 
reading. 

Two hours, Spring Semester, elective for Seniors. The 
President. 

II. — The Messages of the Bible. A careful analysis of the 
teachings of priests and prophets at various periods of Biblical 
history. 

Two hours, Spring Semester, elective for Seniors. The 
President. 

III. — Oriental Archaeology. A series of twelve informal 
lectures, illustrated with the lantern, dealing with modern dis- 



68 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



coveries in Egypt, Palestine, Babylonia and other Bible lands. 
Open to all student but without credit. Proper announcement as 
to the time of the course will be made in advance. Professor 
Schwegler. 

IV. — Old Testament History. Three hours, Fall Semester, 

1907, elective for all college students. Professor Chandler. 

V. — New Testament History. Three hours, Spring Semester, 

1908, elective for all college students. Professor Chandler. 
Besides these formal courses, the University furnishes op- 
portunity for Bible study through its Christian Associations and 
through certain advanced lecture and study classes which are 
carried on in connection with the work of the college church. 
These courses are under the immediate control of members of 
the University faculty and of other thoroughly qualified and re- 
sponsible teachers. 

C. HISTORY AND ECONOMICS. 

Professor E. K. Chandler. 

The courses of the department of History and Economics 
are conducted by means of text books and library research. A 
complete set of MacCoun's historical and geographical charts, 
and a number of other maps are at hand to illustrate the physi- 
cal basis of nations, and enable the student to follow the pro- 
gressive development of their history. The library has a good 
collection of reference works on the history of the United States, 
and provides for facilities for research, in Ancient, Mediaeval, 
and Modern European periods. The literary facilities in Eco- 
nomics and Sociology are fair, and further additions are confi- 
dently expected in the near future. 

The department offers the following courses. Each number- 
ed course covers the work of one Semester. 

I. — The History of Western Europe. Fall Semester, three 
hours, required of all Sophomores. 

II. — The History of England. Spring Semester, three hours, 
required of all Sophomore*. 

III. — European Constitutional History. Fall Semester, 1907, 
three hours, elective for all who have had Courses I and II. 

IV. — The History of the Reformation. Spring Semester, 
1908, three hours, elective for all who have had Course I. 

V. — History of Europe in the Nineteenth Century. Fall 
Semester, 1906, three hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

VI. — Coloniel and Constitutional History of the United States 
to the War of 1812. Fall Semester, 1906, three hours, elective for 
Juniors and Seniors. 

VII. — Constitutional and Political History of the United 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



69 



States from the War of 1812. Spring Semester, 1907, three 
hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

VIII. — History of American Politics. Spring Semester, 1907, 
three hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

IX. — Political Economy. Fall Semester, three hours, re- 
quired of all Seniors. 

X. Sociology. Spring Semester, three hours, required of 
X. — Sociology. Spring Semester, three hours required of 

D. ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 
Professor Hill, Miss Gasaway, Mr. Atchison. 

The equipment for this department is contained in the Uni- 
versity library, and consists of a growing collection of books on 
English literature. 

English Language. 

I. — Rhetoric and English Composition. Fall Semester, two 
hours. Genung's Working Principles of Rhetoric. A course in 
daily themes, with lectures, recitations, and conferences. Re- 
quired of all Freshmen. 

I. — Rhetoric and English Composition. Spring Semester, 
four hours. A continuation of Course I. Required of all Fresh- 
men. 

English Literature. 

III. — Shakspere. Fall Semester, five hours. Lectures and 
recitations upon the life and times of Shakspere. Study and in- 
terpretation of three plays, with special attention to Elizabethan 
grammar, literary form, plot construction, and character study. 
Two theses required. Open to Juniors and Seniors. (Omitted 
1906-07.) 

IV. — English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Fall 
Semester, five hours. A study of the period from the time of 
Swift to the publication of the Lyrical Ballads. Lectures, crit- 
ical study in class of the writings of this period, library work, 
and the preparation of two theses. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

V. — English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Spring 
Semester, five hours. A general survey of the novelists, essay- 
ists, and historians of the period. A brief study of the poetry. 
Lectures, critical study in class, library work and the prepara- 
tion of two theses. The authors studied are Austin, Scott, Dick- 
ens, Thackeray, Eliot, DeQuincey, Lamb, Carlyle, Macaulay, 
Ruskin, Newman, Arnold, Burke, Browning, Tennyson. Open to 
Juniors and Seniors. (Omitted 1906-07.) 



70 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



VI. — American Literature. Spring Semester, five hours. 
General history with special reference to the work of the best 
known writers. Lectures, critical class study, library work, and 
the preparation of two theses. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Besides these formal courses the following work in English 
is required of all college students. 

1. — Every Freshman will be required to learn, and pro- 
nounce before his class one declamation. The class is divided 
into sections, and appropriate instruction and drill provided for 
each student. 

2. — Every Sophomore will be required to write three essays, 
upon topics approved by the head of the department of English. 
These essays must be not less than 1,000 words in length, and 
the first essay is due on the fifteenth day of January, and the 
second and third on the fifteenth day of February and March re- 
spectively. A penalty will be imposed for all unexcused delay in 
presenting this work. Students electing to compete for the Kin- 
ney Prizes, whose contest essay fails to reach a grade of B or 
more, will be required to present two further essays, the first on 
the fifteenth of April and the second on the fifteenth of May. 
Essays ranking below C must be rewritten. 

3. — Every Junior must present to the head of the Depart- 
ment of English three written orations or arguments, each con- 
taining not less than 1,000 words. Subjects and topics for this 
work must be arranged with the instructor in advance. The first 
piece of work is due on the 10th day of November, and the second 
and third on the 10th day of February and May thereafter. A 
penalty will be imposed for all unexcused delay, and work which 
fails to reach C must be rewritten. 

4. — Every candidate for a bachelor's degree in the College 
of Liberal Arts is required in his Senior year to present to the 
head of the department of English, in a form suitable for preser- 
vation, a thesis of from 2,000 to 5,000 words. The thesis must 
be on some topic in which the student has taken special interest 
during his collegiate course, and should represent his best and 
maturest thought on that subject. The specific topic must be 
agreed upon with the head of the department affected, and regis- 
tered with the Department of English on or before the first day 
of December; the outline of the thesis must be presented for 
final approval to the head of the special department under which 
the subject selected properly comes, on or before the fifteenth 
of February. The final draft of the thesis must be presented to 
the head of the English Department on or before the fifteenth of 
May. No thesis will be accepted which does not show signs of 
creditable accomplishments, or which is defective in its English. 
All theses become the property of the University. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



71 



E. THE ANCIENT LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

For the present the instruction which the college offers in 
the ancient languages is limited to Latin and Greek. Hebrew is 
regularly offered only when an active demand for instruction 
arises. The college facilities for instruction in the classical lan- 
guages are excellent. The two departments occupy three ample 
rooms in University hall, of which two are employed as recita- 
tion and lecture rooms, and one as a museum and library. A be- 
ginning has been made of a collection of casts and photographs. 
Of the latter there have been acquired, in part by gifts of friends 
of the departments and in part by purchase, over 500. Many of 
these are large photographs imported from the musea of Europe. 
A large collection of stereographs covering Egypt, Greece and 
Rome is at the disposal of students, and these with properly di- 
rected reading, form a most valuable adjunct to the regular clas- 
sical instruction. Both recitation rooms are equipped with at- 
lases and photographs. The Greek lecture room is equipped wi£h 
thoroughly modern projection apparatus and the department has 
access to a collection of some 1,500 lantern slides. The equip- 
ment is constantly growing in size and value to the instructing 
force, and contributes largely to the growth of the enthusiasm 
and interest of the students. 

E 1 THE LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 
Professor Gordis, Mr. Jones. 

Students entering college with but three entrance units of 
Latin will make up the Vergil or Cicero, as the case may be, in 
the Academy, receiving college credit to the extent of six sem- 
ester hours. No student may, without special permission, under- 
take the courses described below unless he has taken, or is tak- 
ing the work corresponding to the fourth entrance unit. 

Students whose credits do not include the regular amount of 
Latin composition in connection with the second and third en- 
trance units will be required to take supplementary work in 
composition in connection with Course I. 

Courses I-IV are required of all candidates for the degree of 
A. B. or Ph. B. They are so arranged as to include representa- 
tive passages of permanent human interest distributed through 
the period from Terence to Tacitus, with such studies in antiq- 
uities and in literary and political history as will tend to give a 
comprehensive view of Roman civilization and Rome's contribu- 
tion to the life of the modern man. These courses are given ev- 
ery year and should be taken in the order indicated. 

Courses V-XII are elective. They comprise two groups 
which are offered alternate years. Not more than two of these 



72 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



courses are given in any one semester. In 1906-07 the group will 
be V, VI, IX, and X. 

In arranging these electives the needs of several classes of 
students have been considered. Those intending to teach second- 
ary Latin should be particularly interested in VI, X, and XII; 
students of general literature in VII, and XII; students of his- 
tory in V, and VI; scientific students In IX; and students of 
theology and philosophy in VII, VIII, and IX; while any who 
look forward to graduate work in Latin will find open to them 
throughout the Junior and Senior years courses suited to their 
needs. 

I. — Livy. Selections from Books I, XXI, and XXII. System- 
atic review of Latin syntax in connection with exercises in Latin 
composition based upon the text read. Studies in earlier Roman 
history. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, required of Freshmen who are 
candidates for the A. B. and the Ph. B. degrees. 

II a. — Cicero's Letters. The rapid reading of selections with 
emphasis on the biographical and historical content. Supple- 
mentary historical studies. 

Two hours, Spring Semester, required of Freshmen who are 
candidates for the A. B. and the Ph. B. degrees. 

II b. — The Phormio of Terence. The comedy, taken with 
Cicero's letters, affords an introduction to the language used in 
conversation by cultivated Romans. Attention is given to the 
simpler metres, and to archaic forms and constructions, so far 
as necessary for the understanding of the text. Literary history 
of the Republic. 

Two hours, Spring Semester, required of all Freshmen regis- 
tered in the classical and philosophical course. 

III.— Horace. Selections chiefly from the Odes and Epodes 
but including several of the Satires of greatest biographical in- 
terest. Constant attention to the correct metrical reading of the 
Latin, and to the explanation of mythological and historical ref- 
erences. The political and literary history of the Augustan Age. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, required of Sophomore classical 
and philosophical students. 

IV a. — The Agricola and Germania of Tacitus. Studies in 
the history of the Empire from Tiberius to Trajan. 
Two hours, Spring Semester. 

IV b. — Selections from the Letters of Pliny. Studies in 
Roman Private Life. Literary history of the early Empire. 

Two hours, Spring Semester. Both IVa and IVb are re- 
quired of Sophomores in the classical and philosophical courses. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



73 



V. — Cicero's Letters and Roman Political Institutions. This 
course is based on a selection of the letters entirely different 
from that used in II a. Political and constitutional references 
are emphasized. "Abott's Roman Political Institutions" is 
studied. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, elective for all who have com- 
pleted Course IV. 

VI. — Tacitus and Juvenal. Most of the time is given to the 
Annals, Tacitus' most characteristic work. His style, syntax, 
and diction are studied. The essentially satirical temper of the 
Annals is illustrated by the study of selectons from the Satires 
of Juvenal. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, elective for all Juniors and Sen- 
iors who have passed IV. 

VII. — The Epistles and Satires of Horace. Interpretation of 
the Ars Poetica and the more significant literary epistles and 
satires with particular attention to the questions of literary his- 
tory and criticism involved. 

Three hours. Not given in 1906-07. 

VIII. — The De Finibus of Cicero. This exposition and criti- 
cism of the leading ethical theories of antiquity will be inter- 
preted in comparison with the corresponding types of modern 
ethical opinion. 

Three hours. Not given in 1906-07. 

IX. — Luceretius' De Rerum Natura. The selections made 
will illustrate the poetic genius and moral earnestness of Lucre- 
tius, as well as the interesting parallels which his physical and 
biological doctrines present to the speculations of modern sci- 
entists. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, elective for all who have com- 
pleted the required courses. 

X. — Teachers' Course, (a) A survey of Latin Grammar in 
view of recent investigations, with a comparison of the leading 
school grammars, the grammatical study of portions of the text 
commonly read in secondary schools, and the writing of Latin 
exercises, (b) Informal lectures on methods of teaching secon- 
dary Latin, bibliography for the Latin teachers, and the bearing 
of the study of manuscripts, inscriptions, and coins on the in- 
terpretation of ancient literature. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, elective for those who intend 
to teach Latin. 

XI. — Roman Comedy. One comedy of Plautus will be care- 
fully studied from both the literary and the linguistic point of 
view, and one or two others will be more rapidly read. In case 
the class is unfamiliar with Terence, one play may be from that 
author. 

Three hours. Not given in 1906-07. 



74 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



XII. — Vergil. Georgics and Bucolics. This course provides 
an introduction to two new types of Latin poetry, including what 
Mackail has called "The most splendid literary production of the 
Empire." Prospective teachers of the Eeneid find here an oppor- 
tunity to extend their knowledge of Vergil. 

Three hours. Not given in 1906-07. 

E s THE GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 
Professor Schwegler, Mr. E. Pugh. 

The department lays special emphasis upon the progressive 
growth and development of human civilization, and upon the im- 
portance and function of Greece and Asia Minor in aiding and 
directing that growth. The historical method is used through- 
out, and every effort is made to reconstruct as far as it may be 
feasible, the earliest links in the chain of human history, litera- 
ture, and thought. 

The courses are arranged in a three year cycle, and every 
effort will be made to meet the needs of students who desire to 
specialize in this form of study. General elective courses are 
offered to meet the need of students who desire to gain an in- 
sight into the more immediately valuable results of oriental 
archaeology, but who do not wish to study the Greek language. 
The lantern is used freely throughout the work of the depart- 
ment. 

A. — Beginner's Greek. Dictated lessons: inflectional ma- 
chinery, pronunciation, a vocabulary of 150 words, simple text- 
reading, the fundamental principles of syntax. 

Five hours, Fall Semester. 

B. — The Anabasis Book I. Careful review of the inflections, 
syntax, grammar, reading of the first book of the Anabasis, with 
re-translation of the English rendering. 

Five hours, Spring Semester. 

Courses A and B are required of all Freshmen who are can- 
didates for the Arts degree, and who enter without Greek. Stud- 
ents entering the college without conditions will be given full 
college credit for these courses. Of a beginner's class of thirty 
in 1905, twenty-six were Freshmen. Both courses are open elec- 
tives for all students in the college. 

I. The Cyropaedia. Selected passages of the author read, 
review of grammar, forms, and a vocabulary of 1,000 words. 

Five hours, Fall Semester, required of all Freshmen who 
are candidates for the Arts degree. Students who enter condi- 
tioned in Greek take the course after Course B. 

II. The Apology of Socrates. Translation of the text, his- 
torical reading, study of Athenian life and thought. Stereo- 
scopic views accompanied by lectures and museum work. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



75 



Two and one-half hours, Spring Semester, required of all 
Arts candidates who have completed Course I. 

III. The Memorabilia of Socrates. Careful reading of the 
text, Greek philosophy, science and progress. Educational ideals 
and practices. Class lectures and reading. 

Two and one-half hours, Spring Semester, required of all 
Arts candidates who have completed Course II. 

XVII. Lucian's Dialogs. Selected dialogs carefully read, 
Greece 150 A. D.; Rome and Greece; Greece, her philosophers 
and teachers versus Christianity. The decay of the Greek lan- 
guage. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, required of classical Sophomores 
and Juniors. 

XIV. Aristophanes and Greek Comedy. Selected plays 
carefully translated, the Greek stage and public morality and 
religion. The Greek theater and its remains. Biography, his- 
tory and mythology. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of all classical Sopho- 
mores. 

IV. Herodotos. Rapid reading of selected passages from 
the histories of Herodotos, with special reference to the rela- 
tion of Oriental life and thought to the life and thought of 
Greece. The geography and history of Asia Minor. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, elective for all who have passed 
Course III or its equivalent. 

XI. Lysias. Greek orators, their work and place in Greek 
life and thought. The Democracy, its rise and fall. The Athe- 
nenian courts. Reading of the text of selected orations. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, elective for all who have 
passed Course III, or its equivalent. 

XIII. New Testament Greek. The Gospel of John will be 
read in 1906, and with it a number of the epistles which reflect 
the Johannine spirit. The text, its history, philosophic back- 
ground. Dialectic peculiarities. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, elective for Juniors and Seniors 
who have passed Course III or its equivalent. This course may 
not be substituted for a required course. 

XXI. The History of Greek Art. Lectures, text, outside 
reading. Museum and stereopticon work. 1,200 lantern slides 
available. A lecture fee of One Dollar, payable to the instructor, 
will be required of all who elect the course. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, elective for all Juniors and 
Seniors. No knowledge of Greek required. 

XXV. Plato In English. A careful reading of several of 
Plato's masterpieces from translations. Analysis, Greek philoso- 
phy and its phases. The Platonic idealism, and the modern 
trend of thought. 



76 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Two hours, Fall Semester, elective for all Juniors and Sen- 
iors. No knowledge of Greek required. 

F. THE MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 
Professor Cipriani. 

The aim of the work in this department is to give the stud- 
ents a serviceable command of the language studied, and also a 
«ound and reliable training for any kind of advanced linguistic 
study. 

To secure the first end the students are drilled to under- 
stand readily the spoken as well as the written language, and 
to acquire a steadily increasing vocabulary, which they are ex- 
pected to use correctly from the very beginning, both in speak- 
ing and^ in writing. Practically nothing is read during the first 
year that is not made the basis of work in composition or con- 
versation. In the French Department this work has been sup- 
plemented by laboratory practice with phonographs. This meth- 
od enables the students to hear a passage repeated till they have 
absolutely mastered all the difficulties it may contain, and it 
also provides them with an unchanging model to which they can 
strive to conform their own pronunciation. The phonetical script 
of the Association Phonetique has been used in this connection 
with excellent results. The French records used are very clear 
and good. The equipment will be increased as the need for it 
arises, and also extended to the German department. 

To thoroughly ground and train the students in the study of 
language, a constant effort is made to restrict, as much as pos- 
sible, the memorizing of set rules, substituting for this a thought- 
ful consideration of the principles that make the language what 
it is, and some clear, though elementary notions, of its histori- 
cal development and its relation to other languages. This is es- 
pecially insisted on witn regard to the English language, as it is 
chieflly by this means that the study of other languages becomes 
an invaluable aid to the students in the knowledge of their own. 

F THE FRENCH LANGUAGE. 

I. — French, A. and B. Easy Reading (Whitney's Elementary 
Reader, or an equivalent), Conversation and Composition based 
on the text read. Drill in elementary phonetics, with some use 
of the phonetical script. Practice with the phonograph. Oral 
and written reproduction of stories heard but not seen. Gram- 
mar. The work is done chiefly by means of the students' note 
books. Larouse's Grammaire Lexicolique is used for the exer- 
cises. 

Five hours, Fall and Spring Semester. No credit is given 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



77 



the student till the year's work is completed. Required of Philo- 
sophical Sophomores, and open to others as an elective. 

II. — French. Reading, texts of increasing difficulty, one book 
at least in phonetical script. The text prepared is recited, not 
translated. Compositions based on the text read, and rewriting 
of stories told to the class, and very easy lectures. Advanced 
work in grammar. Practice with the phonographs. 

Five hours, Fall Semester. Open to students having com- 
pleted French I the previous year. Other students are admitted 
^o the class only by special arrangement. 

III. — French. French History, recited in French collateral 
readings and oral and written reports by the students. Lectures. 

Five hours, Spring Semester. Open to students having com- 
pleted French it. 

F 2 THE GERMAN LANGUAGE. 

I. — German, A and B. Easy reading, an elementary reader, 
Composition and conversation based on the text read. Oral and 
written reproduction of stories heard but not seen. Grammar, 
taught chiefly by means of the students' note-books. 

Five hours, Fall and Spring Semesters. No credit will be 
given the student till the year's work is completed. Required 
of all Philosophical and Scientific Freshmen who enter the col- 
lege without German, and of Sophomores in the Arts Course. 

II. — German. Reading, texts of increasing difficulty, which 
are recited, not translated in class. Written outlines of the books 
read, reproduction of stories heard, easy letters. Drill in ad- 
vanced grammar. 

Five hours, Fall Semester, required of Freshmen registered 
in the Philosophical, Scientific and Pre-Engineering groups, open 
to all students having completed German I the preceding year. 
Other students will be admitted only by special arrangement. 
Students required to take this course who enter deficient in Ger- 
man, must register for German I in the Freshman year, and for 
German II in the Sophomore year. 

III. — German. Modern Prose Writers. Outside reading as- 
signed to the students. (Some of this reading may be of a scien- 
tific nature.) Written and oral reports by the class, easy lec- 
tures. 

Five hours, Spring Semester, required of all students of 
whom Course II is required. Open as an elective to all students 
having completed German II. 

IV. — Training Course. The department will, moreover, offer 
a Teacher's Training Course, alternately for French and German 
students, who may desire to teach these languages, without hav- 
ing opportunity for further preparation. The course is open only 
to advanced students on consultation with the head of the de- 
partment. Students will not be admitted to it, unless they give 
reasonable promise of becoming satisfactory teachers. The 



78 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



course will consist of a brief study of practical, comparative pho- 
netics, a thorough, practical and theoretical review of grammar 
with some consideration of the text-books used in American 
schools, a discussion of methods; an extensive course of rapid 
reading, drill in advanced composition. The students will be 
given actual practice in correcting papers, and class-room in- 
struction. 

G. THE NATURAL SCIENCES. 

The Natural Sciences are considered under two co-ordinate 
groups, Physical and Biological Science. The University fur- 
nishes an unusually wide range of courses in each of these 
groups. The instruction is of the very best, the equipment is 
modern, and no effort is spared to make the work of these two 
departments thoroughly efficient. The specific description of the 
laboratory and museum facilities of the departments follow be- 
low. 

In estimating credits in all courses involving laboratory 
work, two hours of laboratory work are counted as equivalent 
to one regular recitation period. 

G 1 THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES. 

Chemistry, Physics, Geology. 

Professor Yates. 

The department of Physical Science includes three groups of 
courses dealing with the fields of Chemistry, Physics, and Geolo- 
gy. Special care has been taken to provide for each of these 
groups a working equipment of laboratory, museum, and library 
facilities, with the result that the work which the University 
offers in Physical Science is thoroughly modern and efficient in 
every detail. 

The department controls four laboratories: one devoted to 
general Chemistry, and equipped with every convenience for sec- 
tions of thirty students; a second for advanced Chemistry; a 
third for special tests and gravimetric experiments; and a fourth 
for Physics and the related subjects. The equipment of this lat- 
ter laboratory is of high order, including a new sixteen-plate elec- 
trical machine, spectroscopic apparatus, and other mechanism of 
like order. New additions are being made each year, and no 
pains are spared to supply every reasonable facility needed for 
the proper mastery of the work of the department. 

The natural history museum contains a large section set 
aside entirely for the display of geological specimens. Some 
thousands of specimens are arranged in cases, properly named 
and registered, and serve as the nucleus by means of which the 
work in geology is illustrated. New additions are classified and 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



79 



installed as fast as received, and friends of the school are in- 
vited to deposit here any material which they may deem of in- 
terest. 

The library is well stocked with general reference books 
covering the subjects of the department. In addition a small, 
but carefully selected private library, the property of the instruc- 
tor, has in times past been at the service of students of ability 
and promise The growth of the science collection in the gen- 
eral library in recent years has been especially marked, and the 
collection now includes many of the standard authors. 

CHEMISTRY. 

I. — General Chemistry. Lectures and recitations on the 
chemical elements, their compounds, and the laws of chemical 
change. The lectures are thoroughly illustrated by experiments. 
The student is required to work in the chemical laboratory un- 
der the direction of the instructor four hours each week, to make 
appropriate experiments connected with the elements studied, 
and to tabulate his results. Text-book, Remsen's Briefer Course. 

Fall Semester, four hours, required of all Freshmen. 

II. — Qualitative Analysis. The occurence, methods of prep- 
aration, properties, and uses of the metals; their important com- 
pounds with their separation and determination, together with 
the identification of acid radicals. The complete analysis of easy 
unknown compounds is required. The identification of some of 
the metallic elements, by means of the spectroscope, is given. 
Lectures on Ionization, Solutions, Chemical Action, Methods of 
Analysis. 

Spring Semester, five hours, required of Scientific Fresh- 
men, elective for others. 

III. — Quantitative Analysis. Both volumetric and gravimet- 
ric analyses are made. Occasional lectures on the application 
of Chemistry to other sciences and its relation to the various 
vocations of life. 

Fall Semester, four hours, required of Scientific Sophomores, 
elective for others. 

IV. — Organic Chemistry. The study of the compounds of 
carbon through the aliphatic series. Lectures and Remsen's Or- 
ganic Chemistry as a text. Laboratory work illustrating the 
text and the preparation of easy organic compounds. 

Spring Semester, four hours, required of Scientific Sopho- 
mores, elective for others. 

V. — Lecture Course. Dealing with the history and develop- 
ment of Chemistry, including a discussion of the periodic law, 
and its influence in chemical work. The recent advances made 
in Physical Chemistry and the methods of work are given atten- 
tion. 

Fall Semester, three hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 



80 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



VI. — Physiological Chemistry. The products of the physio- 
logical processes. The chemistry of the life process; dietetics, 
and other kindred subjects. Lectures, and laboratory work. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, elective for Juniors and Sen- 
iors. 

PHYSICS. 

XI. — Introductory. Lectures and recitations on the laws of 
physical phenomena, the study of sound and heat. The laws of 
forces, statical and dynamical. A knowledge of Mathematics 
through Analytical Geometry is presumed. The effort will be to 
present the subject of Physics as a branch of all science, keep- 
ing in view the intimate relation in origin and in development, 
of all the phenomena of the universe. 

Spring Semester, four hours, required of Philosophical and 
Scientific Sophomores, elective for others. 

XII. — Light, Electricity and Magnetism. The same method 
of instruction is employed as in Course I. It is intended to give 
the student such a knowledge of the subject as will fit him to un- 
derstand and appreciate the discoveries in electrical science and 
to apply these to the practical problems of the day. In order 
further to stimulate the students to become acquainted with the 
literature of Physics, each is required to prepare a satisfactory 
essay on some subject before the close of this course. Labora- 
tory work two days each week during both Semesters. 

Fall Semester, four hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

GEOLOGY. 

XXI. — General Geology. LeConte's Elements of Geology is 
used as a text. Occasional lectures on current geological prob- 
lems and discoveries are given. Excursions to points of local 
geological interest are made. The collection and classification of 
not less than ten different fossil specimens. The preparation of 
an acceptable thesis on some correlated subject is required at 
the close of the course. 

Fall Semester, five hours, required of all Juniors. 

XXII. — Minerology. The composition and physical charac- 
ter of the common minerals and rocks likely to be met in every- 
day observation and geological pursuits. The instruction includes 
both laboratory and text book work. 

Spring Semester, four hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

XXIII. — Palaeontology. Lectures on the nature and position 
of different fossil groups. The relation which the various pre- 
historic fauna and flora bear to each other. The student is ex- 
pected to become familiar with the fossils common in Kansas. 

Fall Semester, four hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



81 



XXIV. — Economic Geology. As the name indicates, it is the 
practical side that is here made prominent. Some of the topics 
of economic importance considered are: common rock and vein 
forming minerals, origin of ore deposits, mining terms and meth- 
ods, coal, petroleum, natural gas, clays, geological fertilizers, the 
relation of geology to agriculture. 

Spring Semester, four hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

XXV. — Normal Science This course is offered to those who 
expect to teach the different subjects included in a general 
science course. 

Spring Semester, three hours, elective for Juniors and Sen- 
iors. 



G a THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES. 

Botany, Zoology, Physiology. 
Professor Wilson. 

The work of the Biological group covers General Biology, 
Zoology, Botany, Histology, Physiology and Comparative Anat- 
omy. The courses have been carefully outlined, and are espe- 
cially adapted for that large body of students who are interested 
in the problems of life in its changing forms. 

The departmental laboratories occupy the second floor of 
Science Hall, and are thoroughly equipped with the most ap- 
proved modern apparatus, such as compound microscopes, mi- 
crotomes, incubator, sterilizer, fixing, staining and preserving 
re-agents, microscopic and projection slides. Each student is 
furnished with desk locker, and all necessary apparatus and ma- 
terial. 

The natural history museum contains a large section devoted 
to the display and preservation of biological specimens. Some 
thousands of these have been mounted or otherwise preserved, 
and serve as a working collection for the study of life-forms. 
Additions to the collection will be welcomed, and our friends will 
do us a kindness to put within our reach new and interesting 
specimens. 

The library contains a working collection of books dealing 
with the various subjects included in the group. Recent addi- 
tions have enlarged the value of the collection, and it now serves 
excellently as a literary background for the work of the student. 

I. — General Biology. The more simple laws of life, and the 
relation between plants and animals are presented under this 
topic. Laboratory work on typical representatives of the lower 



82 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



orders of plants and animals forms a large part of the course. 
This is designed as introductory to the advanced courses in Bot- 
any and Zoology, as well as for those who desire a general knowl- 
edge of the laws of life. 

Fall Semester, four hours, required of Scientific Freshmen, 
Philosophical Sophomores, and Pre-engineering Juniors, elective 
for Classical Juniors and Seniors. 

II. — Cryptogamic Botany. Algae, fungi, liver-worts, mosses, 
and ferns. Two lectures and two laboratory exercises a week. 
Fall Semester, four hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

IN. — Morphology, Histology, and Physiology of Flowering 
Plants. Preparation of twenty-five slides. Open to those who 
have taken Histology. 

Spring Semester, four hours, elective for Juniors and Sen- 
iors. 

IV. — Invertebrate Zoology. The purpose of this course is to 
give the student a definite idea of the principles of the science 
of Zoology as generally accepted by zoologists, in order that he 
may understand the philosophical discussions and writings relat- 
ing to modern doctrines of biology. Lectures and laboratory 
work on typical invertebrate forms. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of Scientific and Pre- 
medical Sophomores, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

V. — Vertebrate Zoology. One lecture and one laboratory 
exercise weekly. Open only to those who have taken Course I. 

Spring Semester, four hours, required of Scientific and Pre- 
medical Sophomores, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

VI. — Lectures on the Laws or Principles of Biology and the 

factors in organic evolution. Open to those who have taken 
General Biology. 

Two hours, Spring Semester, elective for Juniors and Sen- 
iors. 

VII. — Histology. A course in the various phases of Histolog- 
ical Technique; injecting, hardening, staining, cutting and mount- 
ing. Preparation and mounting forty sections of typical tissues. 
Lectures and laboratory work. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of Scientific and Pre- 
medical Sophomores. 

VIII. — Cytology. A course dealing with the structure and 
functions of the cell, with methods of work; special reference to 
the developmental phenomena of cell life, and the various prob- 
lems centering upon the cell as the mechanism of hereditary 
transmission. Open to those who have taken Histology. Re- 
quired of Pre-medical Sophomores. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, elective for Juniors and Sen- 
iors. 



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83 



IX. — Advanced Physiology. Lectures and laboratory work. 
Spring Semester, three hours, required of Juniors registered 

in the philosophical, scientific and pre-medical groups. 

X. — Advanced Physiology. A continuation of Course IX. 
A study of Neurology or Osteology. The nervous system and 
its end organs, or the human skeleton, as the needs of the class 
may demand. Lectures and laboratory work. Open only to those 
who have completed Course IX. 

Two hours, Fall Semester, required of Seniors in the pre- 
medical group, elective for others. 

XI. — Bacteriology. A study of typical forms of pathogenic 
and nonpathogenic bacteria. Culture methods, inoculation, ster- 
ilization, prevention of disease, etc. Open to those who have 
had Courses VII and IX. 

Two hours, Spring Semester, required of Seniors registered 
in the pre-medical group; elective for others who are qualified 
to carry the work. 

XII. — Comparative Anatomy. A comparative study of mam- 
malian anatomy. Lectures and laboratory work on typical forms. 
The course is especially designed to meet the needs of medical 
candidates. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of students registered 
in the pre-medical group. 

H. MATHEMATICS AND MECHANICAL DRAWING. 

Professor Bonebright, Miss Beach. 

The department is prepared to furnish instruction in pure 
and applied mathematics. The former courses are provided for 
the general student, while the latter are offered for the benefit 
of those who desire to prepare for an engineering course. Stud- 
ents who take these courses are prepared to enter the Sophomore 
and Junior years of the engineering colleges. 

H 1 MATHEMATICS. 

The department is provided with plane and spherical black 
boards, transits, levels, poles, chains, steel tapes, protractors and 
other apparatus used in surveying and mechanical drawing. 

I. — Algebra. Quadratic equations, series, logarithms, the 
theory of higher equations, and graphical representations of the 
simple relations between variables. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of all Freshmen. 

II. — Trigonometry. Planes and spherical trigonometry and 
the use of logarithms. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of all Freshmen. 



84 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



III. — Analytical Geometry. Co-ordinates, straight line, conic 
sections, higher plane curves. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of all Sophomores 
registered in the science and pre-engineering groups, elective 
for all others who have passed Freshman Mathematics. 

IV. — Differential Calculus. Differentiation, maxima and min- 
ima, and geometric applications. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of all Sophomores reg- 
istered in the science and pre-engineering groups, elective for all 
others who have passed Freshman Mathematics. 

V. — Integral Calculus. Elementary integration as a sum- 
mation and geometric application. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of Juniors who are reg- 
istered in the pre-engineering group. 

VI. — Astronomy. An introductory course of a descriptive 
nature covering the general principles of the science. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, elective for Juniors and 
Seniors in all the groups. 

VII. — Descriptive Geometry. Representation of geometrical 
magnitudes, orthographic projections, the relation between point, 
line and plane, intersection and developments. The class-room 
work is supplemented by practical problems in the draughting 
room. 

Two hours, Fall Semester, required of all Sophomores 
who are registered in the pre-engineering group. 

VIII. — Descriptive Geometry. A continuation of Course VII. 
Two hours, Spring Semester, required of all Sophomores 

registered in the pre-engineering group. 

IX. — Elementary Surveying. The course is based on "John- 
son's Surveying." The theory of surveying, surveying instru- 
ments and practical problems. Trigonometry is a pre-requisite 
for this work. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, required of all Sophomores who 
are registered in the pre-engineering group. 

X. — Elementary Surveying. A continuation of Course IX. 
Field work and practical problems. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, required of all Sophomores 
who are registered in the pre-engineering group. 

H a MECHANICAL DRAWING. 

I. — Introductory Course. The use of instruments, freehand 
exercises, lettering, tracing, geometrical problems, intersections, 
developments, shades and shadows. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, required of all Freshmen regis- 
tered in the pre-engineering group. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



83 



II. — A Continuation of I. The work of Course I continued 
and enlarged. 

Two hours, Spring Semester, required of all Freshmen regis- 
tered in the pre-engineering group. 

III. — Geometrical Problems. Projection, Orthographic, iso- 
metric and oblique intersections, developments, shades and shad- 
ows, details of machines. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of Sophomores regis- 
tered in the pre-engineering group. 

IV. — A Continuation of III. 

Two hours, Spring Semester, required of all Sophomores 
registered in the pre-engineering group. 

Note. — All work in Mechanical Drawing is on a special and 
laboratory basis. Every hour of credit requires two hours of 
work in the drawing room. Every Student will be required to 
furnish his own instruments and material, and to pay in addi- 
tion a special fee of $2.00 for every hour of the work for which 
he registers. 



II. THE ACADEMY 

OF 

OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 

Its Plan, 

Special Advantages, 
Privileges, 
Requirements, 
And Courses. 



1906-1907. 



88 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



INTRODUCTORY. 

The Academy of Ottawa University is maintained in re- 
sponse to a widespread demand for a secondary school which 
shall offer instruction of the very best type under distinctly 
Christian influences. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

Students in the Academy are entitled to all the privileges to 
which the students of the other schools are entitled. The library 
and reading room, the gymnasium and athletic grounds, the mu- 
sical, social, literary, and religious societies are all of them open 
to them within the limitations of their constitutions. 

For entrance to the Academy the student will be expected 
to present credentials showing the satisfactory completion of 
the work of the grade schools. Opportunity will be given to 
make up deficiencies in Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography and 
Spelling, but students who are hampered 
REQUIREMENT by entrance deficiencies cannot expect 

FOR ENTRANCE. to complete the course in the usual time. 

The courses of the Academy are three in number, each 
leading to a diploma, and providing fifteen units of work. A 
unit in the Academy is one study carried through one school 
year with four recitations of one hour each every week. Stu- 
dents who hold a diploma of this Academy may enter without 
examination the College of Ottawa University, or of any of 
the other schools of Kansas and the contiguous states. 

Students who are mature, in good health and ambitious, are 
encouraged to complete the work of the Academy in three 
years, thereby saving one year of the ordinary high school 
course. This opportunity commends itself at once to students 

who appreciate the value of time, and 
LENGTH OF who desire to enter college as soon as 

COURSES possible. Under this schedule the stu- 

THREE YEARS. dent will carry twenty hours of class 

room work each week for three years. 
Careful oversight will be maintained over the work and health of 
each student endeavoring to complete his academic 
eourse in three years, and any student who fails 
for any reason to maintain a satisfactory standing 
tn the courses for which he is registered will 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



89 



be required to drop one of his studies and to spend four years 
in the Academy, or to do summer work. Every opportunity 
consistent with the highest type of work will be given to am- 
bitious and energetic students to complete the work in three 
years. It is suggested, however, that the student arrange to 
concentrate his time and energy as completely and exclusively 
as possible on this work. 

SCHEDULE OF COURSES. 

As above stated, the courses are three in number, the 
classical, the philosophical and the scientific. The requirement 
of each of these courses is as follows. The letters indicate the 
serial number of the course, the numerals show the number of 
recitations per week. 



Classical. 

English a, 4 

History a, 4 

Latin a, 4 

Mathematics.. A, 4 
Physiography A, 4 

English B, 4 

History B, 4 

Latin B, 4 

Mathematics.. B, 4 
Physiography B, 4 

English C, 4 

Latin C, 4 

Mathematics. . C, 4 

Physics A, 4 

Botany a, 4 

English D, 4 

Latin d, 4 

Mathematics.. D, 4 

Physics B, 4 

Botany B, 4 

English E, 4 

Latin E, 4 

Greek A, 5 

Mathematics. . E, 4 
Latin G, 4 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

, Philosophical. 

English A, 4 

History A, 4 

Latin A, 4 

Mathematics. .A, 4 
Physiography A, 4 

English B, 4 

History B, 4 

Latin B, 4 

Mathematics. .B, 4 
Physiography B, 4 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

English C f 4 

Latin C, 4 

Mathematics. .C, 4 

Physics A, 4 

Botany A, 4 

English D, 4 

Latin D, 4 

Mathematics. .D, 4 

Physics B, 4 

Botany B, 4 

SENIOR CLASS. 

English E, 4 

Latin E, 4 

German A, 5 

Mathematics . . E, 4 
Latin G, 4 



Scientific. 

English A, 4 

History A, 4 

Latin A, 4 

Mathematics. . A, 4 
Physiography A, 4 

English B, 4 

History B, 4 

Latin B, 4 

Mathematics. . . B, 4 
Physiography B, 4 

English C, 4 

Latin C, 4 

Mathematics. . .C, 4 

Physics A, 4 

Botany A, 4 

English D, 4 

Latin D, 4 

Mathematics. . . D, 4 

Physics B, 4 

Botany B, 4 

English E f 4 

Latin E, 4 

German A, 5 

Mathematics.. E, 4 

History; C, 4 



90 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



English F, 

d) Lathi F, 

| Greek B, 

£ Mathematics . . F, 

Latin H, 



4 English F, 4 

4 Latin F, 4 

5 German B, 5 

4 Mathematics F, 4 
4 Latin H, 4 



Latin F, 4 

English F, 4 

German B, 5 

Mathematics F, 4 
History D, 4 



Students wh® elect to do the work of the Academy in four 
years may elect from the following group of courses such sub- 
jects as they may desire, except that not more than 20 hours 
may be carried at any one time. Work taken in the college 
in the fourth year of academy work will be credited toward the 
college degree, but in every case the student will be required 
to secure the written consent of the instructor in charge before 
he can be registered in any eollege subject. 

Fall. Spring. 



From the Commercial School. 



Bookkeeping. 
Stenography. 
Typewriting. 
Telegraphy. 



Bookkeeping. 
Stenography. 
Typewriting. 
Telegraphy. 



From the Academy. 

German A. German B. 

Greek A. Greek B. 

History C. History C. 

From the College. 

Chemistry I. Chemistry II. 

Mathematics I. Mathematics II. 

Rhetoric I. Rhetoric II. 
Biology I. 



Students who have been properly registered, and who have com- 
pleted less than five units of the course outlined, are classified 
as Juniors. Those who have completed five or more units, but less 
than ten units, are classified as Middle class students; and those 
who have completed ten units are classed 
CLASSIFICATION. as Seniors. On completion of the fif- 
teenth unit of work the student is en- 
titled to his diploma, and will receive it on the commencement 
day following, providing he has met such other provisions and 
requirements as the University may prescribe. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



91 



THE COURSE IN DETAIL 

I.— ENGLISH. 

The courses in English, offered in the Academy are designed 
to give to the student: (1) An accurate, though elementary 
knowledge of the English Language and Literature, and (2) 
systematic practice in simple Prose Composition. 

A. First Year English. First semester, 4 hours. Constant 
practice is given in oral expression of thought through class re- 
citation. Written work is required weekly or oftener, chiefly 
upon subjects previously discussed in the class. The chief aim 
in reading is to cultivate a taste for the best literature and an 
appreciation of its beauty and worth. Selections are read from 
Scott, Irving, Lowell, Tennyson, and Eliot. A more careful study 
is made of two or three masterpieces. Texts: Elementary En- 
glish Composition, Scott and Denney; English Classics, various 
authors. 

B. Second Semester, 4 hours. A continuation of A. 

C. Second Year English. First semester, 4 hours. For 
general description see English A. Reading from Shakspere, 
Wordsworth, Dickens, Macaulay, Addison and Steele. Texts: 
English Classics. 

D. Second Semester, 4 hours. A continuation of C. 

E. Third Year English. First semester, 4 hours. For gen- 
eral description see English A. Reading from Chaucer, Shaks- 
pere, Milton, Eliot, and Burke. Texts: History of English and 
American Literature, Johnson; English Classics. 

F. Second Semester, 4 hours. A continuation of E. 

In addition to the formal work in English, special instruc- 
tion is given in the principles of correct speech and address, and 
in the writing and pronouncing of orations. Detailed information 
relative to this work is given to the classes affected at stated 
times in the course of the school-year. 

II.— HISTORY. 

The student selecting the courses in history here described 
will have secured a rapid bird's-eye view of the important epochs 
of human history. The Academy is fully provided with books, 
charts and maps for the proper presentation of this work. 

A. Ancient History. 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of 
Juniors. Text: The Ancient World, West. 

B. Ancient History. 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of 
Juniors. Text: The Ancient World, West. 



92 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



C. Mediaeval History. 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of 
Senior Scientific students, and elective by temporary substitu- 
tion for other Seniors. Text: Mediaeval and Modern History, 
Meyers. 

D. Modern History. 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of 
Senior Scientific students, and elective by temporary substitu- 
tion for other Seniors. Text: Mediaeval and Modern History, 
Meyers. 

III.— LATIN. 

Each year's work consists of two connected courses which 
together form a unit. 

A. and B. The Elements of Latin. Oral and written drill 
in declension and conjugation throughout the year; vocabularies 
impressed by the study of English derivations and Latin correl- 
atives; practice in the accurate, smooth and intelligent reading 
of the Latin; the reading of a considerable amount of easy 
Latin; the study and use of the more common noun and verb 
constructions. 

A. 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of all Junior students. 

B. 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of all Junior students. 

C. and D. Caesar and Latin Composition. Selections are 
read from Caesar's Gallic War, equivalent in extent to the first 
four books. The study of the structure of the complex sentence 
forms a prominent feature of the first semester's work. Gram- 
mar and Composition are studied in the manner described above. 

C. 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of all Middle Class 
students. 

D. 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of all Middle Class 
students. 

E. and F. Cicero's Orations and Latin Composition. Em- 
phasis is placed on the historical and rhetorical significance of 
the speeches. Students are encouraged to interpret by the prop- 
er oral rendition of the Latin text. Composition and Grammar 
are continued as in the case of Caesar. The speeches regularly 
read are those against Catiline, the one for the Manilian Law 
and the one for Archias. 

E. 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of all Seniors. 

F. 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of all Seniors. 

G. and H. Vergil's Aeneid and Latin Composition. The 

Aeneid is studied primarily as literature. The student is helped 
to understand the poem as relative to the Augustan age, to the 
Homeric epic, and to modern literature. The characteristics of 
the Aeneid are so constructed as to provide an introduction to 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



93 



poetry in general. The rhythmical and at the same time intel- 
ligent reading of the Latin forms an essential part of the work 
throughout. The exercises in Latin composition for the year 
illustrate a systematic review of Latin syntax. 

G. 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of Seniors who intend 
to become candidates for the classical or philosophical degrees 
of Ottawa University. 

H. 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of Seniors who need 
to take Course G. 

IV.— GREEK. 

A. — Beginner's Course. Full mastery of the inflectional ma- 
chinery, the fundamental principles of Greek case use and of 
verbal syntax. A vocabulary of 200 words, and reading of sim- 
plified selections from the first book of the Anabasis. Goodwin's 
Greek Grammar. 

Five hours, Fall Semester, required of all Classical Seniors. 

B. — The First Book of the Anabasis. Careful reading of the 
text, syntax, vocabulary, informal composition, English transla- 
tions retranslated into Greek. 

Five hours, Spring Semester, required of all Classical Sen- 
iors. Harper and Wallace's Anabasis. 



V.— GERMAN. 

The work of the German classes is introductory, and stress 
is laid on accuracy in pronunciation, on syntax, vocabulary, and 
composition. All written work is carefully examined, and every 
effort made to assist the student in gaining an accurate foun- 
dation for his later work. 

A. — Beginner's German. The principles of pronunciation, 
syntax and grammar. Constant emphasis on written and oral 
exercises. 

Five hours, Fall Semester, required of all Senior Philosophi- 
cal and Scientific students. No credit given until Course B has 
been completed. 

B. — Beginner's German. Course A continued. Simple se- 
lections read. The plan of the course is to give to the student 
as complete a knowledge of the written and spoken language as 
it is possible to secure in one year. 

Five hours, Spring Semester, required of all Senior Philo- 
sophical and Scientific students. 



94 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



VI.— PHYSICAL SCIENCE. 

The work is carried on in the laboratories of the college, and 
every reasonable facility is provided for the mastery of the 
principles presented. 

Physiography. Lectures, recitations, laboratory and field 
work on the physical features of the earth. The courses lay a 
foundation for later geological study, and call attention to the 
forces now affecting the earth's crust. 

A. — The earth's movement and the solar system; the ero- 
sion and disintegration of the earth's surface by the action of 
water; the formation of soils and the relation of the physical 
features of the earth to the life of man. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of all Juniors. 

B. — The atmosphere, its properties and movements; climate 
and its factors; the distribution of life; the adjustment of indus- 
trial pursuits to environment. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of all Juniors. 

Physics. The elementary principles of Physics are presented 
by text, lectures and laboratory experiment. Every effort is 
made to present the fundamental laws which underlie physical 
phenomena, and to introduce the student to the methods of mod- 
ern science. An introductory course. 

A. — The properties of matter, mechanics, and heat. Labora- 
tory work on two days of each week. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of the Middle Class. 

B. — Sound, light, electricity, and magnetism. Laboratory 
work on two days of each week. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of the Middle Class. 

VII.— BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE. 

The laboratories of the department are equipped with mod- 
ern facilities for the work of the class in Botany, and the appa- 
ratus of the college is available for class or laboratory demon- 
stration as occasion may demand. 

A. — Structural and Physiological Botany. A general survey 
of the plant world, designed to give the student a comprehensive 
view of the entire vegetable kingdom. Some of the life processes 
of plants, especially those which illustrate the fundamental prin- 
ciples of nutrition, assimilation, growth, irritability, and repro- 
duction are studied. Types of the lower plants as well as of the 
higher are employed in order to show that the process is funda- 
mentally the same in all. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of the Middle Class. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



95 



B. — A Continuation of Course A. Due attention is given to 
the subject of Plant Ecology. The preparation of a herbarium 
and the analysis of a sufficient number of plants to familiarize 
the student with the methods of plant analysis and classification 
are required. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of the Middle Class. 

VIII.— MATHEMATICS. 

A. — Algebra. An introductory course. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of all Junior students. 

B. — Algebra. A continuation of course A, extending to quad- 
ratic equations. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of all Juniors. 

C. — Algebra. Rapid review of the introductory work; the 
theory of exponents, radicals and quadratic equations. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of all Middle Class 
students. 

D. — Plane Geometry. Exercises based on a text, with spe- 
cial emphasis on original problems. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of all Middle Class 
students. 

E. — Plane Geometry. A continuation of course D. 
Four hours, Fall Semester, required of all Seniors. 

F. — Solid Geometry. Recitations on solid geometry with 
special attention to the geometry of the sphere. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of all Seniors. 



THE NORMAL SCHOOL 



OF 

OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 

Its Plan, 
Privileges, 
Requirements, 
Certificates, 

Professional Advantages, 
and Courses. 



1906-1907. 



98 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

The Normal School of Ottawa University is 
SCOPE AND organized and maintained under the conviction 
AIM. that there are few ways in which a Christian 

school can more effectively exert its proper 
influence than by training and moulding teachers, who shall 
carry its message abroad into the rank and file of society. It is 
felt that the new interpretation which is being put upon the term 
"Education" is singularly opportune to the ideals for which Ot- 
tawa University stands, and for that reason a special emphasis 
is being laid upon the work of this school. 

The school is organized under the laws of the 
THE LEGAL state of Kansas. The courses offered have 
STATUS received the fullest approval of the State 

Board of Education, and graduates of the 
school are entitled to all the advantages which the law provides. 
Every student who has completed the course offered by this 
Normal School, is entitled, after passing an examination in the 
so-called professional subjects, to a three-year's state certificate, 
enabling him to teach without further examination in any public 
school, including the schools of cities of the first and second 
class, in Kansas and in some other states. If the holder of this 
three-year certificate teaches acceptably during two of the three 
years during which the certificate is in force, he may exchange 
it for a life-certificate. 

Normal students may at any time during or 
COLLEGE after their graduation register in any of the 

CREDIT. regular classes of the Academy or of the Col- 

lege. Full credit will be given for all standard 
credits earned in the Normal School, and no time is lost by 
reason of courses which are below standard or unacceptable 
in any current schedule of entrance requirements. 

The University is justly proud of the excellent record which 
its graduates have made for it, especially in Kansas, Colorado, 
the Dakotas, Wisconsin and Minnesota. The demand for some 
time has been greater than the supply, although the University 
is sometimes able to recommend good teachers on very short 
notice. School authorities are invited to correspond with Ot- 
tawa University when in need of new teachers. 

A Bureau of Recommendations has been organized, which 
will endeavor to assist every graduate of promise in securing a 
position on the basis of his merit. The bureau will endeavor to 

enter into relations with employers, 
BUREAU OF and to keep a carefully corrected and 

RECOMMENDATIONS. thoroughly accurate record of every 

graduate, with a view to placing Ot- 
tawa graduates into such positions as they may be qualified 
to hold. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



99 



Normal students are entitled without extra cost to all the 
privileges of the University library and reading room, to mem- 
bership in the religious, literary, and social organizations, and 

to the use of the University gymnasium. Reg- 
PR I VI LEGES, ular instruction is offered in the gymnasium, 

and normal students may at will join any of 
the University athletic teams for which they may be qualified. 



TUITION. FEES, AND INCIDENTALS. 

The tuition in the Normal School is, like that of the College 
and Academy, $20.00 per semester. This includes an incidental 
fee of $2.00, which is required of every student who registers in 
the University. If the student wishes to pay his tuition in ad- 
vance for the entire year, and does so during the first week of 
the Fall Semester, a discount of $2.00 will be allowed, making 
the whole bill for the year but $38.00. 

For the laboratory fees which will need to be paid in con- 
nection with some of the scientific courses, see the register of 
laboratory fees on page 37 of this catalog. 

The same ruling with reference to tuition remission which 
has been made for the students of the college will be observed 
in the case of Normal students who are compelled for good cause 
to withdraw from the school. For the details of the arrange- 
ment see page 37 of this book. 



THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRANCE. 

The entrance requirements of the Normal School are iden- 
tical with those of the Academy. The candidate will be expect- 
ed to show evidence of satisfactory progress in the work covered 
in the grade-schools, and must in addition, in order to secure the 
active co-operation of the school, show himself to be a person of 
genuine ability and of sound character. The University will not 
recommend a student who is defective in either of these direc- 
tions. 



THE NORMAL COURSE. 

The Normal Course proper covers four years of work. For 
the convenience of a considerable number of students who enter 
deficient in one or more of the common branches, a preparatory 
year is maintained. The work included in the course is as fol- 
lows. The letters indicate the numbers of the course, the ara- 
ble numerals indicate the number of recitations per week. 



100 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Preparatory Year. 
Fall Semester. Spring Semester. 

Arithmetic Arithmetic 
Grammar Grammar 
U. S. History Geography 
Spelling Bookkeeping 
Penmanship Commercial Law 

First Year. 

Algebra A, 4 Algebra B, 4. 

Latin A, 4 Latin B, 4 

English A, 4 English B, 4 

History A, 4 History B, 4 



Second Year. 



Algebra C, 4 

Latin C, 4 

English C, 4 

Physics A, 4 

Botany A, 4 



Geometry D, 4 

Latin D, 4 

English D, 4 

Physics B, 4 

Botany B, 4 



Third Year. 

English E, 4 English F, 4 

Chemistry I, 5 Rhetoric II, 4 

Biology I, 5 Logic 3 

Pedagogy I or IV, 4 Pedagogy Il-lll or V, 5 

Rhetoric I, 2 Elective subjects 4 

Fourth Year. 



Sociology 3 

Pedagogy V or Il-lll, 5 

Elective subjects 10 



Psychology I, 5 

Geology I, 5 

Political Economy 3 

Ethics 2 

Pedagogy IV or I, 4 

To students who have completed this course, the University 
will issue a Normal diploma, which will entitle the student to 
full credit before the State Board of Education, except that he 
must pass the state examination in the technical subjects. This 
examination is held in May of each year in University Hall, un- 
der the supervision of this University. 



THE COURSE IN DETAIL. 

It will be noticed that the courses named above form an ec- 
lectic group, selected from the usual courses of the high school 
and college. The elective courses indicated must be selected 
from the collegiate courses. The courses fall into four groups: 

1. — The Sub-Academic Courses are those which are offered 
in order to give students an opportunity to make up back work. 

2. — The Academic Courses are those which in the above list 
are marked with capitals. They will be found described in detail 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



tOI 



In connection with the statement of the work of the Academy on 
pages 87 to 95 of this catalog. 

3. — The Courses Bearing Roman Numerals are selected from 
the regular college course, and represent some of the more im- 
portant elements of that group of courses. Detailed descriptions 
of these courses may be found in connection with the work of 
the College of Liberal Arts on pages 45 to 85. 

4. — The Professional Courses under the title of Pedagogy I 
to V, include the subjects prescribed by the State Law of Kan- 
sas. A detailed description of these courses will be found in the 
collegiate section of this catalog, in the group of subjects en- 
titled "Philosophy and Education." The courses are as follows: 



Pedagogy I, School Methods. 

Pedagogy II School Management. 

Pedagogy III, School Law. 

Pedagogy IV, Philosophy of Education. 

Pedagogy V, History of Education. 



IV. THE SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 

OF 

OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 

MUSIC, ART, ELOCUTION. 

General Information, 

Entrance Repuirements, 

Tuition and Fees, 

Courses and Degrees, 

The Department of Instruction. 



1906-1907. 



104 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



The School of Fine Arts of Ottawa University offers instruc- 
tion in Music, Art, and Elocution. The instruction of these de- 
partments is systematically arranged into groups and courses, 
each of which leads to its appropriate diploma or degree. In 
each case there has been combined with the strictly technical 
work of this school such literary work as will best aid in secur- 
ing the results desired. The standard of instruction may be ex- 
pected to be of the very highest, and neither time nor expense 
will be spared to have the work of the school a credit to the 
University, and satisfactory to the student. 

A.— GENERAL INFORMATION. 

In general, all students in the School of Fine Arts will be 
subject to the same regulations and provisions in the matter of 
matriculation, registration, and payment of tuitions as are stated 
in Part Three of this catalog. The faculty of the School of Fine 
Arts will, however, from time to time,, make such special rulings 
and regulations as will best advance the interests of the school. 
Such new regulations will be properly posted on the official bul- 
letin boards, and students who are interested may inform them- 
selves from that source. 

The studios of the School of Fine Arts are five in number. 
Those of the musical departments are mainly located in the 
heart of the city of Ottawa, where they are convenient of access. 
Those of the department of Art and of Elocution are for the pres- 
ent located in University Hall The musical studios are thor- 
oughly equipped with modern instruments, and the city contains 
several pipe organs, which under reasonable conditions are 
available for study and practice. A musical library is also main- 
tained, and students are expected to familiarize themselves with 
the best writings on musical and artistic topics. 

Students in the School of Fine Arts are entitled to all the 
privileges to which other students of the University are entitled. 
They are encouraged to avail themselves of all the opportunities 
so offered, and to gain for themselves the largest measure of 
profit from their residence at Ottawa. 

B — DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS. 

The School of Fine Arts offers courses of instruction which 
lead either to the baccalaureate degree of Fine Arts, or to diplo- 
mas in some one of the special departments, or to certificates of 
proficiency. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts is conferred on any 
duly matriculated student who shall satisfactorily complete the 
baccalaureate course described on page 107 of this catalog. Full 
resident study of not less than three years will be required of all 
candidates for this degree. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 105 



The Diplomas of the Various Departments of Music, Art, and 
Oratory will be granted to all properly qualified candidates who 
have completed any one of the secondary courses outlined below. 

Certificates of Proficiency will be given to any student who 
for any reason desires to enroll only for selected work. Students 
so enrolled are classed as special students. 

C. — ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

Students enrolling in the School of Fine Arts as candidates 
for any of the degrees, diplomas, or certificates above described, 
will be required to present entrance credentials on the same 
basis as that on which students in the other school of the Uni- 
versity are required to present them. 

I. — Candidates for the Degree of Fine Arts in Music must 
present fifteen units of entrance credit from some accredited 
high school or academy. They will also be expected to have 
completed all of the preliminary courses on the piano. Students 
who enter without any work on the piano will not be able to se- 
cure the degree in three years. For details of the entrance re- 
quirement see page 47 of this catalog. Deficiencies may be made 
up in the academy under the same conditions as those under 
which students in the College are permitted to make up condi- 
tions. Instead of the mathematical units included in the regular 
entrance schedule students who wish to take up work in music 
may offer as entrance credits two and one-half units of litera- 
ture, history, or science. 

II. — Students Who Desire the Diplomas of some special de- 
partment must present credentials equivalent at least to those 
which are required for unconditional entrance to the Academy. 
For the detailed statement of these requirements see page 88 of 
this catalog. They will also be expected to have completed all 
of the preliminary courses on the piano. Students who enter 
without any work on the piano will not be able to secure the 
diploma in three years. 

III. — Special Students will be required to show such profi- 
ciency in the common English branches as will enable them to 
carry on the work for which they enroll with credit to them- 
selves and with satisfaction to the University. 

NOTE. — No credit will be given for work done under teach- 
ers other than those licensed by this University, nor for work 
done under University teachers in subjects for which they have 
not been licensed, except on special examination. A fee will be 
required for all examinations for advanced standing. 

D. — TUITION AND OTHER FEES. 

The tuition rates of the School of Fine Arts depend directly 
upon the kind and quantity of the work which the student is do- 



106 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



ing. For the purpose of giving a working basis of estimation, the 
semesters of the University year are divided into four nearly 
equal terms of approximately ten weeks each. The tuition 
charges are estimated on the basis of these terms. The literary 
studies are estimated on the basis of a full semester of 19 weeks. 

After August 30, 1906, all tuitions are payable into the treas- 
ury of the University in advance, either in cash, or by a receipt- 
ed order from the instructor under whom the work is to be done. 
Blanks for these orders may be secured from the Dean of the 
School of Fine Arts. 

Incidental fee, required of all students registered in the 
School of Fine Arts, per term of 10 weeks $1.00 

The Literary Courses, in the College and the Academy, for 
each semester hour, $1.50, but in no case less than $5.00, nor 



more than $18.00 per semester. 

Art per semester, lessons, one each week, two hours each, $4.00 
Art per semester, 36 lessons, 2 each week, 3 hours each, $10.00 
Art per semester, 54 lessons, 3 each week, 3 hours each, $13.00 
Art per semester, 90 lessons, 5 each week, 3 hours each, $22.00 

Art single lessons, 1 hour $ .50 

Pyrography, single lessons, 1 hour, $ .35 

Vocal Training, per term, 20 lessons, 2 each week, one-half 

hour, $20.00 

Public School Singing, per term, 20 lessons, 2 each week, 

one-half hour, : $20.00 

Chorus Singing, per term, 10 lessons, 1 each week, one-half 

hour, in class, $ 1.50 

Piano, Advanced, per term, 20 lessons, 2 each week, one- 
half hour, $20.00 

Piano, Advanced, single lessons, 1 hour, $ 1.25 

Piano, Introductory, per term, 20 lessons, 2 each week, 

one-half hour, $10.00 

Piano, Introductory, single lessons, one-half hour, $ .50 

Violin, 20 lessons, per term, 2 each week, one-half hour,. ..$20.00 
Mandolin or Guitar, per term, 20 lessons, one-half hour,. . .$10.00 
Pipe Organ, per term, 20 lessons, 2 each week, one-half 

hour, $20.00 

Pipe Organ, single lessons, one-half hour, $ 1.00 

Reed or Brass Instruments, per term, 20 lessons, 2 each 

week, one-half hour $20.00 

Reed or Brass Instruments, single lessons, one-half hour,. .$ .50 



Note : The tuition rates above announced are subject to fluc- 
tuation from time to time. They are, however, approximately 
standard, and may be expected to prevail without change for the 
immediate future. 

No discount is made for lessons that have been missed, ex- 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



107 



eept that the instructor may at his convenience make up such 
lessons. It is, however, not obligatory for the instructor to do 
so, except when the absence was incurred for thoroughly satis- 
factory reasons. 



E. — THE COURSES LEADING TO DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS. 

As above stated, students may register either as candidates 
for the degree of Fine Arts, as candidates for a diploma, or as 
special students. To meet the needs of these three classes of stu- 
dents the following courses have been arranged: 



I. THE COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHE- 
LOR OF FINE ARTS. 

The courses leading to the degree of Fine Arts are planned 
to cover three years of work, with approximately 50 hours of 
recitation and study per week. The degree for the present is 
given only for work in music. It may be expected that in the 
very near future the degree will also be conferred for work in 
Art and Oratory. 



A. — The Degrees in Music. 



FIRST YEAR 

Fall Semester. 

A Modern Language, 5 hrs. 
Rhetoric I, 2 hours. 
Harmony I, 2 lessons. 
Grade la in the selected 
musical group, 2 lessons. 

SECOND YEAR 



Spring Semester. 

A Modern Language, 5 hours. 
Rhetoric II, 4 hours. 
Harmony II, 2 lessons. 
Grade lb in the selected 
musical group, 2 lessons. 



A Modern Language, 5 hours. 
Harmony III, 2 lessons. 
Grade Ha in the selected 

musical group, 2 lessons. 
Theory, 2 lessons. 



A Modern Language, 5 hours. 
Harmony IV, 2 lessons. 
Grade lib in the selected 

musical group, 2 lessons. 
Theory, 2 lessons. 



THIRD YEAR. 



A Modern Language, or 
English Literature, 5 hours. 
Grade Ilia in the musical 
group selected, 2 lessons. 



A Modern Language, or 
English Literature, 5 hours. 
Grade 111b in the musical 
group selected, 2 lessons. 



History of Music, 2 lessons. History of Music, 2 lessons. 
Advanced Harmony, 1 lesson. Advanced Harmony, 1 lesson. 

Musical groups leading to the degree are offered in Voice, 
Piano, Pipe Organ and Violin. See the pages following for the 
details of each of these groups. 



108 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Students in Vocal Music will take in the third year Musical 
Literature instead of Harmony. 

II.— THE COURSES LEADING TO THE DIPLOMA. 

The diploma courses are planned to cover three years of 
work, with about 50 hours of recitation and study each week. 
The diplomas are intended to rank as equivalent to the diploma 
of the Normal School. Diploma courses are offered in Music, Art, 
and Elocution. 

A. — The Diploma Course in Music. 
FIRST YEAR. 

Fall Semester. Spring Semester. 

English A, 4 hours. English B, 4 hours. 

History A, 4 hours. History B, 4 hours. 

Harmony I, 2 lessons. . ^. Harmony II, 2 lessons. 
Music, Grade la, 2 lessons. Music, Grade lb, 2 lessons. 

SECOND YEAR. 

English C, 4 hours. English D, 4 hours. 

Harmony III, 2 lessons. Harmony IV, 2 lessons. 

Music, Grade II a, 2 lessons. Music, Grade lib, 2 lessons. 

Theory I, 2 lessons. Theory II, 2 lessons. 

THIRD YEAR. 

German A, 5 hours. German B, 5 hours. 

Harmony V, 2 lessons. Harmony VI, 2 lessons. 

Music, Grade Ilia, 2 lessons. Music, Grade Illb, 2 lessons. 
History of Music, 2 lessons. History of Music, 2 lessons. 

Students in Vocal Music will take in the third year Musical 
Literature instead of Harmony. 

Musical groups leading to the diploma are offered in Piano, 
Pipe Organ, Voice and Violin. See the pages following for the 
details of each of these groups. 

B. — The Diploma Course in Art. 

FIRST YEAR. 
Fall Semester. Spring Semester. 

Art. Art. 

History A, 4 hours. History B, 4 hours. 

English E, 4 hours. English F, 4 hours. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Rhetoric I, 2 hours. Rnetoric II, 4 hours. 

Botany A, 4 hours. Botany B, 4 hours. 

French A, 5 hours. French B, 5 hours. 

Art Art. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



109 



THIRD YEAR. 

English Literature, 5 hours. English Literature, 5 hours. 
The History of Art, 3 hours. The History of Art, 3 hours. 
French I, 5 hours. French II, 5 hours. 

Art. Art. 

Students selecting the General Illustration course in Art 
will take the art courses in the following order: 

Fall. Spring. 

First Year, Art la, IVa. Art lb, IV, VI. 

Second Year, Art Ha, III, Va. Art lib, Vb, Vila. 

Third Year, Art Vllb. Art VII c. 

Students who select the General Design course in Art will 
take the Art work in the order below Indicated: 

Fall. Spring. 
First Year, Art la, IVa. Art lb, IVb, VI. 

Second year, Art Ha, III, Va. Art lib, Vb, Villa. 
Third Year, Art VHIb. Art VIIIc. 

C. — The Diploma Course in Elocution. 

FIRST YEAR. 
Fall Semester. Spring Semester. 

English, 4 hours. English, 4 hours. 

History A, 4 hours. History B, 4 hours. 

German A, 5 hours. German B, 5 hours. 

Piano, 2 lessons. Piano, 2 lessons. 

Physical Training I, 2 lessons. Physical Training II, 2 lessons. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Rhetoric I, 2 hours. Rhetoric II, 4 hours. 

Psychology, 5 hours. Sociology, 3 hours. 

German I, 5 hours. German II, 5 hours. 

Vocal Training, 1 lesson. Vocal Training, 1 lesson. 

Physical TrainingIII,2 lessons. Physical Training IV, 2 lessons. 

Elocution I, 3 lessons. Elocution II, 3 lessons. 

THIRD YEAR. 

English Literature, 5 hours. English Literature, 5 hours. 
Oratory, 1 hour. Oratory, 1 hour. 

Vocal Training, 1 hour. Vocal Training, 1 hour. 

Elocution III, 3 hours. Elocution IV, 3 hours. 

Bodily Expression, 2 lessons. Bodily Expression, 2 lessons. 

F. — THE DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 

The University provides at the present time instruction in 
the leading fine arts subjects. This instruction has been group- 
ed into the following departments: 

1- — Piano, Including elementary and advanced grades. 



110 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



2. — Pipe Organ, elementary and advanced grades. 

3. — Vocal Music, elementary and advanced grades. 

4. — Violin and Stringed Instruments. 

5. — Reed and Wind Instruments. 

6. — Theory and History of Music. 

7. — Harmony, Counterpoint. 

8. — Art and Applied Design. 

9. — Elocution and Oratory. 

I. THE DEPARTMENT OF PIANO FORTE. 

The work of the department is divided into two divisions, the 
first being introductory, and the second advanced. Ordinarily a 
student by close application may expect to complete one of these 
divisions in three years, and the courses outlined above are 
based on that fact, but no assurance can be given other than 
that the student will be advanced as rapidly as his progress war- 
rants. Some students may need more than three years for each 
of the divisions. 

All students who wish to register as candidates for either 
the degree of Fine Arts in Music or for a musical diploma, will 
be required to complete the introductory work before undertak- 
ing the advanced work; and a satisfactory examination will be 
required before the student is allowed to pass into the advanced 
division. 

A.— THE INTRODUCTORY PIANO GRADES. 
A.— The First Year Grade. 
Selected studies from Gurlitt, Koehler, Czerny, and Loesch- 
horn; easy compositions by Schmidt, Kullak, Lichner, Behr, and 
others; daily technical work. 

B. — The Second Year Grade. 

Selections from Lemoine, Op. 27; Koehler, Op. 50, bk. 2; 
Duvernoy, Op. 120; Burgmueller, Op. 100; Loeschhorn, Op. 66; 
Herrer, Op. 47; Sonatinas, Clementi, Kuhlau, etc. Easy Sonatas 
by Haydn and Mozart. Compositions by Spindler, Schumann, 
Emery, Kullak, and others; daily technical work. 

C— The Third Year Grade. 

Selections from Heller, Op. 46; Loeschhorn, Op. 66; preludes 
by Bach, Krause's Trill Studies. Velocity Studies by Berens, or 
Loeschhorn, or Czerny. Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart, and Beetho- 
ven. Exercises, Scales and Arpeggios by Hannan. Compositions 
by Chopin, Mendelssohn, Schubert, Lieging, Foote, and others. 

Students who have satisfactorily completed the introductory 
grades above outlined are entitled, if they desire it, to a certifi- 
cate of proficiency. 

B.— THE ADVANCED PIANO GRADES. 

Note: The courses scheduled below constitute the piano 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



111 



group required of all candidates for the degree or diploma in 
music who select the piano as their work. 

FIRST YEAR. 

la. — First Half-year. Cramer Studies; Bach, Two and Three 
part inventions; Daily Technique, Czerny and Kohler; 
Compositions by Chopin, Mendelssohn, Paderewski, 
Foote, and others. 

lb. — Second Half-year. Czerny, Velocity Op. 740; Sonatas by 
Mozart and Beethoven; Daily Technique, Czerny or Koh 
ler; Compositions by Schumann; Weber, McDowell, 
Scharwenka, and others. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Ma. — First Half-year Clemente, "Gradus ad Parnassum;" 
Bach, English Suites; Tausig's Daily Technique; Com- 
positions by Chopin, Shubert, Raff, Mozkowski, and 
others. 

Mb. — Second Half-year. Mayer, Op. 168; Sonatas, Beetho- 
ven, Shubert, Weber; Tausig's Daily Technique; Com- 
positions by Mozart, Schumann, Grieg, Mason, and 
others. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Mia. — First Half-year. Moscheles, Op. 70; Bach, Well-tem- 
pered Clavichord; Tausig's Daily Technique; Composi- 
tions by Mendelssohn, Rubenstein, Doorak, Saint Saens, 
and others. 

1Mb. — Second Half-year. Etudes by Henselt; Chopin, Op. 
10 and 25; Sonatas by Beethoven, Schumann and 
Chopin; Compositions by Liszt, Wagner, Brahms, 
Weber, and others. 
The final public examination, which must be passed by every 
candidate for a degree or diploma will consist of any ten selec- 
tions from the standard works mentioned in the preceding list. 

A musical study and interpretation class for students in the 
advanced grades meets every two weeks. The composers and 
their work are studied in detail. The class is free to students 
in the department, and attendance on the part of all candidates 
for the piano degree or diploma is required. 

2. — THE DEPARTMENT OF THE PIPE ORGAN. 

The work of the Pipe Organ department will be put into 
thoroughly responsible hands, and will be as carefully organized, 
and as accurately taught as are the other musical subjects. The 
facilities at hand are among the very best in the state of Kan- 
sas, and students intending to pursue a course of study on the 
Organ will do well to write the president of the University for 
the special information which will be ready by August first. 



112 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



(A full published statement of the work and course of the Pipe 
Organ department may be expected in the September number of 
the Quarterly Bulletin. The bulletin will be mailed free of charge 
on request.) 

3. — THE COURSES IN VOCAL MUSIC. 

The courses of the vocal department are divided into two 
divisions, preparatory and advanced. Every student who regis- 
ters for the degree or the diploma in vocal music, will be re- 
quired to pass an examination on the courses included in the 
preparatory group. 

The instruction of the department aims at voice develop- 
ment and the impartation of strength and purity to the tone. 
Pupils are prepared for church, oratorio and concert work, as 
well as for teaching. All lessons are given privately. 

A.— THE PREPARATORY GRADES. 

A. — The First Year. Correct breath control; exercises and 
Solfeggio; ear training; voice placing; elementary studies; bal- 
lads. 

B. — -The Second Year. Exercises and Solfeggio; breathing 
exercises; voice placing; ear training; Panofka; Concone; bal- 
lads. 

C. — The Third Year. Exercises for flexibility and articula- 
tion; voice placing; Concone; Spiker's exercises for vocalization, 
songs by English and American composers. 

Students who have satisfactorily completed the preparatory 
grades in Vocal Music are entitled to a certificate of proficiency 
if they wish it. 

B.— THE ADVANCED GRADES. 

Note: The courses scheduled below constitute the musical 
group required of all who select Vocal Music as their line of 
work. 

The First Year. 

Grade la. — First half. Exercises for flexibility, Marches! or 
Concone; Italian studies by Vaccai; English and Italian songs. 

Grade lb. — Second half. The authors named in Grade la 
continued, with advanced work and exercises. 

The Seocnd Year. 

Grade Ma. — First half. Advanced studies; Concone, Mar- 
chesi, Bordogni; songs by foreign writers. 

Grade Mb.— Second half. The work outlined in Grade Ha 
continued and completed. Increasing attention to technical 
accomplishment. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



118 



The Third Year. 

Grade Ilia. — First half. Exercises by Marches!, Bonaldo, 
Lamperte; public performances, both in solo and choral work. 

Grade 1Mb. — Second half. Spiker; Oratorio; Opera; Bra- 
vura songs. Completion of work from previous half-year. 

Candidates for the degree or diploma in vocal music will be 
required by way of final public examination to sing any one or 
more of the works above mentioned, or such others as may reas- 
onably be prescribed by the musical faculty concerned. 

CHORAL INSTRUCTION. 

All pupils are urged to attend the chorus rehearsals for the 
benefit of the drill and for the opportunity of sight-reading and 
the knowledge gained of the better grades of music. It Is the 
custom for the members of the Conservatory Chorus to give in 
public during the winter season, at least one oratorio or cantata. 
No charge is made for membership in the chorus. 

SIGHT SINGING. 

There is organized every year a class in sight singing to give 
to those who desire it an opportunity to take up systematic study 
of the principles of music as applied to sight singing. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

In response to a continued demand throughout the country 
for Supervisors of Music in the public schools, the department 
has added a course of instruction in public school music. The 
best systems in use in the public schools of Chicago, New York 
and Boston are taught. This course extends through the school 
year and the tuition is the same as in voice lessons. 

4. THE DEPARTMENT OF VIOLIN AND OTHER STRINGED 
INSTRUMENTS. 

The instruction on the violin is divided in the same manner 
as the work in piano-forte is divided, and everything that was 
noted in the introduction to the work of the piano department 
applies also to the work on the violin. Students enrolling in the 
work of this department are requested to read carefully the in- 
troduction referred to. 

A. THE PREPARATORY GRADES IN VIOLIN. 

This work must be done before the student can register as a 
candidate for either the degree or the diploma in music. 

Violin Methods by Hohmann, Dancla, David, Ries, Schrad- 
ieck. Studies by Wohlfahrt, Sitt, Kayser, Dont, Mazas, Scales 
in two octaves. Duos by Mazas, Pleyel, Dancla, etc. Solos by 
Dancla, de Beriot, Sitt, Schumann, Hauser, German, Raff, etc., 
suitable to grade. Ensemble work. Must have at least one year 
on the piano. 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



B. THE ADVANCED GRADES IN VIOLIN. 

The courses grouped below constitute the musical group re- 
quired of all candidates for the musical degree or diploma who 
select the violin as their work. 

The First Year. 

Grade la. — The First half-year. Kreutzer. Scales and ar- 
peggios in three octaves. Concertos by Accolay, Viotti, Rode, 
and de Beriot. 

Grade lb. — The Second half-year. Kreutzer. Scales and ar- 
peggios in three octaves. Double stops. Legende by Wieniaw- 
ski; Romances, Beethoven; Russian Airs, David; Elegie, Ernst; 
Andante, and Scherzo by David. 

The Second Year. 

Grade I la. — The First half-year. Fiorillo. Dancla's school 
of mechanism. Sonatas, Handel A major, Tartini G minor. Con- 
certos, Bazzini, Godard, Spohr, etc. 

Grade Mb. — The Second half-year. Rode, Moto perpetuo, 
Paganini. Romanze by Bruch; Fantaisie Militaire, Leonard; 
Fantaisies and Polonaise, Vieuxtemps, Faust Fantaisie by Sar- 
asate. Must be able to play well at sight. 

The Third Year. 

Grade Ilia. — The First half-year. Rode; Dont (Gradus ad 
Parnassum). Sonatas by Bach and Nardini. Concertos by Men- 
delssohn Bruch, Wieniawski. 

Grade 1Mb. — The Second half-year. Gavinier. Concertos by 
Vieuxtemps, Molique, Spohr. Compositions by Saint Saens, Bee- 
ttoven, Sauret, Brahms, Sarasate, etc. Interp re ration aDd musi- 
cal literature. 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR. 

Instruction in mandolin and guitar will be given as it may 
be required, but no set course has been arranged, nor will the 
work so taken be counted either toward a degree or a diploma. 

THE COLLEGE ORCHESTRA. 

The college orchestra furnishes valuable opportunities for 
study, practice, and ensemble playing to students who are work- 
ing on string and reed instruments. Instruction in the orchestra 
is free, although students who join the organization will be ex- 
pected to attend all rehearsals, practices, and chapel services, 
at which the orchestra regularly appears. A credit of one sem- 
ester-hour will be given to all students in the college or academy 
who perform this work satisfactorily. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



115 



5. THE REED AND WIND INSTRUMENTS. 

Instruction of the very best order is provided in both reed 
and wind instruments. Excellent opportunities are offered stud- 
ents in these lines of work for study and practice in band and 
orchestra. 

6. THE THEORY, HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF MUSIC. 

The scientific principles involved, and the mechanism em- 
ployed in the production of music are of such importance that 
the study of the subjects grouped under this head will commend 
themselves at once to the earnest student of music. 

THEORY OF MUSIC. 

I. — Introductory Theory. The mechanism and vocabulary 
of musical representation; time, rhythm, scales, notes, keys. 
Second advanced year, Fall Semester, twice weekly. 

II. — Advanced Theory. Acoustics, the laws of tone produc- 
tion, tone color, instrumentation. Second advanced year, Spring 
Semester, twice weekly. 

Both courses are required of candidates for the musical di- 
ploma and degree. 

THE HISTORY OF MUSIC. 

I. a and b. — The History of Music from 1600 B. C, to the 
present time. Biographies, instrument study, essays. Third 
advanced year, throughout the year, twice weekly. Both a and 
b are required of all musical graduates. 

MUSICAL LITERATURE. 

I, a and b. — The Literature of Music. Biographies, essays, 
current criticisms, the discussion of present day musical events 
and publications. Library work. Third advanced year, through- 
out the year, once weekly, required of all vocal musical grad- 
uates, in place of advanced harmony. 

7. HARMONY AND COUNTERPOINT. 

The courses of this department are intended entirely for 
the advanced grades. The work will be characterized by thor- 
oughness and care, and no student will be allowed to graduate 
until a minimum prescribed amount of this work has been done. 

I. — Elementary Harmony. Harmony up to and including 
the Secondary 7th chords. First advanced year, Fall Semes- 
ter, twice weekly. 



116 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



II. — Elementary Harmony Continued. Harmony to and in- 
cluding suspensions. First advanced year, Spring Semester, 
twice weekly. 

III. — Harmonizing Melodic Subject in Soprano. Analyzing; 
harmony, including figured chorale. Second advanced year, Pall 
Semester, twice weekly. 

IV. — Harmonizing Melodies. Different parts; analyzing; 
single counterpoint. Second advanced year, Spring Semester, 
twice weekly. 

V. — Advanced Harmony. Counterpoint and musical form. 
Analysis of form from the great masters. Third advanced year, 
Fall Semester, once weekly. 

VI. — Advanced Harmony Continued. Regular rhythm, ir- 
regular rhythm, the various forms of musical composition stud- 
ied in detail and by examples. Third advanced year, Spring 
Semester, once weekly. 

Courses I to IV in Harmony are required of all candidates 
for the musical diploma or degree. Courses V and VI in Har- 
mony are required of candidates for the musical degree or di- 
ploma in the piano department. 

8. THE DEPARTMENT OF ART AND APPLIED DESIGN. 

The courses of the department of Art and Applied Design are 
arranged to be taken in three groups: 

A. — The General Illustration group includes courses II, III, 

V, and VII. 

B. — The Applied Design group includes courses la and b, 
Ha and b, III, IVa and b, Va and b, VI, Villa, b, and c. 

C. — The Teachers Drawing course includes courses I, IV, and 

VI. The aim of this last group is to develop the powers of ob- 
servation and accuracy. A working knowledge of art aids the 
teacher to arouse the interest of pupils, and lessens his own 
labor. 

The courses may be taken singly and without regard to set 
courses by students who desire to work along selected lines. 

I, a and b. — Freehand Drawing. Freehand drawing in char- 
coal from still life and cast. Aims to teach the students to construct 
form in a simple manner with accuracy and fidelity to detail. 
The First Year, first and second semesters. 

II, a and b. — Freehand Drawing. Freehand drawing in 
charcoal and crayon from cast, nature and life. The Second 
Year, first and second semesters. 

III, — Freehand Drawing in pen, ink, and brush. From still 
life and nature. The Second Year, first semester. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



117 



IV, a and b. — Perspective. Object to execute perspective 
drawings, shadows and reflections. Application of perspective. 
The First Year, first and second semesters. 

V, a and b. — Composition. Original compositions on given 
subjects. The Second Year, first and second semesters. 

VI, — Painting. Painting in oil, water-color, or pastille from 
still life and copy. The First Year, second semester. 

VII, a, b, and c. — Painting. Painting with oil, water-color, 
or pastille, from nature, landscape, life, and copy. Second 
Year, second semester. Third Year, first and second semesters. 

VIII, — Ornamental Design. Practical and applied design. 
Study of arts and crafts as regards principles of design in book 
covers, embossed leathers, and metal work. Third Year, first 
and second semesters. Second Year, spring semester. 

9. ELOCUTION AND ORATORY. 

The special work of the department as proposed is to be of 
three kinds, falling under the three heads of Physical Training, 
Elocution, and Oratory. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

(Six courses required of candidates for the diploma in elo- 
cution.) 

I. — General Introductory Course. Physical development and 
freedom. Special exercises aimed at complete plasticity of the 
body, and the establishment of health. Twioe weekly, first year, 
Fall Semester. 

II. — Rhythmic Movements. Relaxation, poise, control, 
rhythmic steps and marches. Twice weekly, first year, Spring 
Semester. 

III. — Free-hand Gymnastic Movements. Bells, wands, clubs, 
balls, and other light apparatus. Twice weekly, second year, 
Fall Semester. 

IV. — Heavy Gymnastics. Full mastery of the body by the 
use of apparatus. Twice weekly, second year, Spring semester. 

V. — Bodily Expression. Repose, modes of expression, prin- 
ciples underlying bodily expression, kinds of expressive action, 
the agents used, mannerisms, and how to avoid them; exercises. 
Twice weekly, third year, Fall Semester. 

VI. — Dramatic Action. Descriptive action, practical exer- 
cises, gesture, posture, practical problems. Twice weekly, third 
year, Spring Semester. 

ELOCUTION. 

(Four courses required of candidates for the diploma in 
Elocution.) 



118 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



I. — General Introductory Course. The human voice, speech, 
its object, laws and limitations. The vocal apparatus, and 
speech formation. Training in pronunciation, with special em- 
phasis on ear training, accent and quantity. Three times weekly, 
second year, Fall Semester. 

II. — Voice Modulation. The modulation of the voice, phrase 
accent, grouping of phrases, vocal inflection and its meaning, 
tone color. Three times weekly second year, Spring Semester. 

III. — Expression. The principles of expression, ideas and 
their conception, the imagination; simple emotions and their 
expression, imagery, social emotions; momentum; light and 
shade; practical examples in life study. Three times weekly, 
third year, Fall Semester. 

IV. — Literary Interpretation. Reading, different kinds of 
literature translated into vocal speech, recitations, platform pre- 
sentation, Bible reading, repertoire, extemporaneous speaking. 
Three times weekly, third year, Spring Semester. 

ORATORY. 

(Two courses required of candidates for the diploma in 
Elocution.) 

I. — The History of Oratory. (Sears, History of Oratory.) 
Once each week, third year, Fall Semester. 

II. — Oratory. Practice in writing and delivering orations. 
The principles underlying the construction and delivery of effec- 
tive oratory. Study and analysis of noted examples from the 
English and other languages by translations. Once each week, 
third year, Spring Semester. 



THE COMMERCIAL SCHOOL 

OF 

OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 

Its Plan, 
Privileges, 
Requirements, 
Diplomas, 

Professional Opportunities, 
and Courses. 



1906-1907. 



120 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



INTRODUCTORY. 

The Commercial School is the answer of Ottawa University 
to a still widespread demand for a group of courses which shall 
rapidly and effectively prepare young men and women of lim- 
ited means and time, for a business career. The courses of the 
school are planned with the greatest care, and the instruction 
provided is of the highest grade. The University proposes to 
maintain increasingly in this school the same high standard of 
scholarship which it maintains in its other schools. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

Students entering the Commercial School will be required 
to show credentials covering fully the work of the common 
schools, and giving assurance of good character and conduct. 
No student will be received whose conduct or class-room work 
is not thoroughly satisfactory, and no student will be received 
from the other schools of this or other Universities, who cannot 
show satisfactory clearance papers from the school last attended. 

PRIVILEGES, 

All students of the Commercial School are entitled without 
extra charge to the advantages of the University library and 
reading room, to participation in its athletic activities (subject 
to the rules on page 35), to membership in the literary, religious, 
and musical organizations, and to the use of the gymnasium. 
They may also, without extra charge, elect work in the Acad- 
emy, thus enriching the courses, except that not more than 
twenty-five hours of weekly recitations may be taken in any 
one semester. 

THE COURSES. 

Graduates of the school will be awarded a diploma, and will 
be granted within the limits of their accomplishments, all the 
advantages of the bureau of recommendations. For some time 
the demand for high-class Smith-Premier and Remington 
machine operators, stenographers, and book-kepers has exceed- 
ed the supply, and the authorities of the school will undertake 
to recommend every graduate who has shown himself able to do 
his work with credit, to a position. Students desiring the very 
highest positions, must expect to add to the work of the Commer- 
cial courses a liberal training in English, History and Mathe- 
matics, such as may be elected in the Academy. Students of 
ability and promise are urged to combine their commercial work 
with elective work from the Academy, and to spend two years 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



121 



in preparing. Special credit and recommendation will be given 
foi work so done. 

The courses of the Commercial School are three in number, 
and the length of time required to complete any one of them 
may be expected to be one semester of nineteen weeks. Some 
students require more time, but no student will be held back 
because of the tardiness of others. All students are urged for 
the sake of better preparation, to combine their course with 
electives from the Academy as above suggested. Students may 
enter at any time, and will receive their certificates of pro- 
ficiency when the course selected has been completed. For the 
benefit of students who desire to carry on summer work, a sum- 
mer term of ten weeks beginning on the Tuesday preceding 
Commencement day is conducted. The three courses are the Sten- 
ographic, the Commercial, and the Telegraphic. They are 
described in detail below. 

TUITION AND FEES. 

The tuition required of students in the Commercial School 
is twenty dollars per semester, payable in advance. Students 
entering after the opening of the semester will pay at the rate 
of $1.50 per week for the remainder of the semester, or for such 
time as they may desire to remain, but the entire fee is due in 
advance, and may be extended only as a personal concession. 

Students intending to enter any athletic or other public 
contest held under the auspices of the University by any of its 
student organizations are requested to consult the athletic rule 
on page 35 of this catalog. Such students will pay in advance the 
full tuition of the semester in which they enter, or if they enter 
late they will pay in advance for the rest of the current semester 
at the rate of $1.50 per unexpired week. 

The cost of tuition for the Summer Term is ten dollars. A 
fee of $4.00 per semester is collected as typewriter rental of all 
students who take work in typewriting. The school furnishes 
all machines and undertakes their care. The typewriter fee 
tor the Summer Term of ten week is two dollars. 



122 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



THE GROUPS OF COURSES. 



Fall Semester. Spring Semester. Summer Term. 
I. — The Regular Commercial Course. 



Bookkeeping. 
Commercial Law. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 

Commercial Arith. 
Business Grammar. 



Bookkeeping. 
Commercial Law. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 

Commercial Arith. 
Business Grammar. 



Bookkeeping. 
Commercial Law. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 

Commercial Arith. 
Business Grammar. 



II. — The Regular Stenographic Course 



Shorthand. Shorthand. Shorthand. 

Typewriting. Typewriting. Typewriting. 

Penmanship. Penmanship. Penmanship. 

Spelling. Spelling. Spelling. 

Bookkeeping. Bookkeeping. Bookkeeping. 

Business Grammar. Business Grammar. Business Grammar. 



III. — The Regular Telegraphic Course. 



Telegraphy. 
Typewriting. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 

Commercial Arith. 
Bookkeeping. 



Telegraphy. 
Typewriting. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 

Commercial Arith. 
Bookkeeping. 



Telegraphy. 
Typewriting. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 

Commercial Arith. 
Bookkeeping. 



It is suggested that wherever possible the following arrange- 
ment of courses be made and that the work be extended to 
the completion of the combined course and in such event a 
special Master Accounts diploma will be granted to the student 
completing the combined course. 



IV.— THE COMBINED COURSE 



Leading to the 

Fall Semester. 

First Year. 

Elementary Composition. 
Algebra A. 
History A. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 
Bookkeeping I. 



of Master of Accounts. 

Spring Semester. 

First Year. 

Elementary Rhetoric. 
Algebra B. 
History B. 
Commercial Law. 
Commercial Arithmetic. 
Bookkeeping II. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



123 



Second Year. 

Shorthand I. 
Typewriting I. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 
German A. 
English Literature. 



Second Year. 
Shorthand II. 
Typewriting II. 
Telegraphy. 
History D. 
German B. 
American Literature. 



A DESCRIPTION OF THE COURSES IN DETAIL. 



A. The Commercial Course. 



The courses included under this title are planned to impart 
to the student a knowledge of the science of accounts, to drill 
him carefully in the preparation of business papers, to impart 
a thorough drill in business arithmetic, and to give such 
experience in actual business transactions as will best qualify 
him for a practical business life. The course in commercial 
law is included as invaluable in business life, and particular 
attention is given to the principles which are most essential 
to business men. 

I. Bookkeeping. — Musselman's Complete Theory of Ac- 
counts; Single Entry; Complete Account Book; Single Entry for 
Grocers and Market Men; Double Entry; Journalizing; Closing 
the Ledger with Balance Sheets; Partner Admitted; Columnar 
Journal; Wholesale; Manufacturing; Real Estate; Corporations; 
Commission; Banking; Lumbering. 

II. Actual Business. — Capital in College Currency furnished 
by the Principal; Manuscript; Merchant's Emporium and Post- 
office; Railroad and Shipping Office; Stock Exchange; Real 
Estate and Insurance; Wholesale House; Commission House; 
Banking. 

III. Commercial Law. — McKenna; Analysis of Contracts, 
with written forms; Negotiable Paper; Currency; Partnership; 
Corporation; Guaranty; Sale of Chattels; Stoppage in Transit; 
Payment and Tender; Liens; Interest and Usury; Affreight- 
ment; Bailment; Insurance; Arbitration; Distribution of East- 
tates of Deceased Persons; Real Estate Conveyances. 

IV. Business Arithmetic. — McKenna's Short Forms in Ad- 
dition; Multiplication; Division; Denominate Numbers; Per- 
centage; Interest; Discount; Equation of Payments; Alligation; 
Exchange; Partnership; Commission; Annuities; Taxes; 
Stocks; Building and Loan Associations. 

V. Penmanship. — Palmer's Guide to Business Writing; 
Classification and Analysis of Letters and Figures, and their 
combination into exercises; Movement Exercises continued; 
Business Letter Writing; Folding Papers and Addressing En- 
velopes; Rapid Business Writing. 



124 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



B. — The Stenographic Course. 

The very rapid increase in the demand for expert stenog- 
raphers and typewriters has been indeed remarkable. The 
course outlined proposes to enable the student to undertake 
ordinary work as reporter or secretary. For the latter positions 
the student is advised by all means to secure the highest educa- 
tional advantages within reach in addition to the course here 
outlined. 

The systems of shorthand used are the Gregg and the Graham, 
and students are required before graduation to accomplish a 
speed of one hundred and twenty-five words per minute. The 
time required to accomplish this depends on the ability and dili- 
gence of the student. 

The Smith-Premier and the Remington typewriters are in 
use. The student will be expected to write at an average speed 
of not less than forty words per minute before graduation. 
Students may advance as rapidly as they wish, and will not be 
required to wait for slow or dilatory pupils. 

Especial attention is given to teaching the principles of 
business correspondence, manifolding, abstracting, court and 
newspaper reporting, etc., so that the student who completes 
the course need not fear to undertake any of the many positions 
that are open for the stenographer. 

I. Corresponding Style. — Gregg's Manual, or Graham's 
Handbook. Phonetics, Principles, and Word-building; Exercises. 
Reading; First and Second Phonographic Readers, and U. C. S. 
Series. 

II. Reporting Style. — Principles of Abbreviation; Phrasing; 
Logograms; Exercises. Reading; "The Greatest Thing in the 
World," and other selections in Reporting Style. 

III. Typewriting. — Special attention is given to the 
"Touch System" of Typewriting; Mechanism and Machines; 
Principles; Fingering; correcting Errors; Copying; Manifolding. 
Students are expected to operate either the Smith Premier or 
the Remington machine with speed and accuracy before grad- 
uation. 

C. — The Telegraphic Course. 

The training given in this course, in the initiatory, inter- 
mediate and finishing departments, is systematic, and complete, 
embracing everything essential to a practical knowledge of 
telegraphy and station agent's work. The following is an out- 
line of the course: 

Battery, its care and management; relation of circuits and 
instruments; line of main circuit; putting up lines; adjustment 
of instruments; standard train orders; train signals; classifica- 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



125 



tion of trains, train dispatches; rules governing the movement of 
trains by telegraph orders; classifying; billing; and proper re- 
porting of freight. 

No person will be graduated from this course till he can 
receive thirty words per minute accurately, spell well, write a 
legible, rapid hand and pass a satisfactory examination in the 
other branches required in the course. One Semester is the 
length of time given to complete all branches mentioned in this 
course. 

The branches not described in detail here may be found 
described in connection with the two courses above. 



PART Y. THE CATALOG OF STUDENTS. 



The catalog of Ottawa University will here- 
after be published on or before the first day of 
April of each year. The following roll contains 
the names of all students who have been in ac- 
tual attendance at some time between March 
first 1905, and March first 1906, except that the 
students listed as "post-graduate" students have 
done their work elsewhere for the most part. 



Note: The usual abbreviations have been employed through 
out the roll, "CI." standing for classical course, "Ph." being used 
to signify the philosophical course, "Sc." denoting the scientific 
course, and "Mus." indicating the musical courses. 



128 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



THE COLLEGE. 

THE POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Bell, Harry Coleman, B. S., Pine Island, Minn. 

Christie, Alonzo Bee, A. B Newton Centre, Mass. 

Collett, Ewing Nathan, Ph. B Bacone, I. T. 

Cory, Alfred Terry, A. B. Scott City, Kansas. 

Goble, William David, A. B., Newton Centre, Mass. 

Goodman, Alfred E., A. B., B. D., Clearwater, Kansas. 

Hopkins, David Orval, A. B Kansas City, Kansas. 

Hopkins, Thomas John, Ph. B., Crozier, Penn. 

Kaho, John Franklin, A. B., Altamont, Kansas. 

McCune, Bessie Maltbie, A. B., Conway, Arkansas. 

Mieir, Charles Francis, Ph. B., Newton Centre, Mass. 

Peterson, Frank F., A. B., Newton Centre, Mass. 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1905. 

Alwes, Catherine Wilhelmina, Ph. B., Ottawa 109 Poplar 

Banta, Alpheus Corydon, A. B Oberlin 717 Oak 

Barrett, Roy Henry, A. B Hutchinson 819 Main 

Boyd, John Keenyan, Ph. B Ottawa 625 Sycamore 

Ellis, Samuel Bevington, Ph. B Iola 701 Oak 

Good, Arra Leone, Mus. B Ottawa 634 Poplar 

Goodwin, Homer Field, Ph. B Ottawa 413 Poplar 

Gottman, Fred William, A. B Ottawa 610 Cedar 

Harrison, Bruce Magil, B. S Ottawa 129 Elm 

Judy, Nera Margaret, Ph. B Ottawa 423 Willow 

Kelly, Parker Lincoln, A. B Kansas City, Mo., 727 Mul. 

Larson, Esther Sophia, Ph. B Ottawa ... 910 W. Sixth 

Moses, Drusilla Adeline, Ph. B Ottawa 743 S. Main 

Newcomb, Justina Abby, Ph. B Ottawa 733 Cedar 

Rathbun, Beulah, B. S Ottawa 630 Ash 

Rathbun, Laura Belle, A. B Ottawa 630 Ash 

Remington, Jessie Belle, B. S Osawatomie, Charlton Cot. 

Robbins, William Fletcher, Ph. B Ottawa . . o . . . 734 Cherry 

Shive, Ida Belle, A. B Burrton 623 Cedar 

Shultz, Earle, A. B Ottawa . . 13th and Cedar 

Smith, Mary Elvira, Ph. B Ottawa ... 433 Sycamore 

Smith, Lloyd Casey, A. B Redfield 834 Poplar 

Stannard, Elizabeth Susan, A. B Ottawa 820 Cedar 

Taylor, Evaline Moore, B. S Ottawa 413 Ash 

Thompson, Claude Francis, B. S Republic 421 Poplar 

TTDham, Burl Nathaniel, B. S Wellsville ... 421 Poplar 

Williams, Alice Mary, Ph. B Ottawa 1104 Poplar 

Willis, Arthur Esterly, B. S Ottawa 429 Cherry 

Wren, Mabel, Ph. B Kincaid ... 730 Mulberry 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



129 



THE SENIORS, CLASS OF 1906. 

Abbott, Fidelia Nichols, CI Wellington 703 Poplar 

Atchison, James Ross, CI Richmond. .633 Sycamore 

Beach, Leila Virgilia, Ph Ottawa 912 S. Cedar 

Bureau, Ernest Adolph, Ph Ottawa. .... .123 Hickory 

Christie, Ralph Edgar, Sc Waverly 204 Walnut 

Collett, Ernest Benjamin, Sc Ottawa 527 Sycamore 

Ebaugh, Clarence Goodwin, CI McPherson 728 Poplar 

Estabrook, Claire, Ph Ottawa 324 Locust 

Haigh, Glenn Joseph, Sc Ottawa 428 Cherry 

Hildreth, Eva, Ph Mound Valley.. 837 Cedar 

Hoy, Mary Oda, Ph...* Long Island 837 Cedar 

Hutchins, Vivian Evangeline, Ph Ottawa. East Wilson 

Jones, Elgie Joel, CI McLouth 720 S. Main 

Jones, Harvey Harrison, CI Norwood 800 S. Main 

Jones, Herbert Charles, CI Wichita 815 Poplar 

Kimmel, Ruby Goral, Sc McLouth, Charlton Cottage 

Manley, Charles Rothwell, Ph Ottawa 425 Hickory 

Merriman, Maud Evangeline, Ph Ottawa 533 Sycamore 

Monbeck, William Elmer, CI Burroak S. Cedar 

Morse, Alice Mabel, Ph Phillipsburg. . .703 Poplar 

Peck, Mabelle Milne, CI Ottawa 527 S. Locust 

Ramage, Olive Maud, CI Arkansas City, Charl. Cot 

Robinson, Florence Rose, Ph Ottawa 410 Sycamore 

Russell, Olive, CI Derby 837 Cedar 

Veeh, Mary Augusta, Ph Stuttgart 743 Poplar 

Wood, Norman Elmore, CI Wamego 215 Hickory 



THE JUNIORS, CLASS OF 1907. 



Bird, Grace Ina, Sc 

Constant, Nita Belle, CI 

Culter, Carl Judson, Ph 

Evans, Foster, CI 

Gasaway, Hallie Elaine, Ph.. 

Grass, Dora Ellen, Sc 

Hutchins, Rose Lillian, Ph... 
King, Edward Everett, Ph... 

King, Harry Lee, Ph 

Lawrence, Eldred Brown, Ph 

Lieurence, Leota L., CI 

McCoy, Anna Gevene, Sc.... 

McCune, Frank Elton, CI 

Maupin, Hattie Belle, CI 

Mitchell, Cynthia Veda, Ph.. 
Parrish, Augusta Crete, Ph . . 
Shinn, Tabitha Laura, Ph . . . 
Southwick, Rodney Erie, Ph. 



Ottawa 731 Mulberry 

Ottawa 603 Poplar 

Norton 819 S. Main 

Richmond. . . .8th & Cedar 

Ottawa 11th & Cedar 

LaCrosse . . . Charlton Cot. 

Ottawa East Wilson 

Ottawa 633 Poplar 

Ottawa 633 Poplar 

Ottawa 604 Willow 

Bronson Charlton Cot. 

Ottawa 823 S. Cedar 

Ottawa 910 Main 

Ottawa Hickory 

Eureka 609 S. Oak 

Ottawa 727 Oak 

Ottawa 508 Locust 

Wichita Gymnasium 



130 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Speaks, Edgarda Lee, CI Wallis, Texas. .Charl. Cot 

Sutherland, Anna Grace, Ph Ottawa 421 Poplar 

VanCleve, Hattie Priscilla, Ph Ottawa 920 Cedar 

THE SOPHOMORES, CLASS OF 1908. 

Armstrong, Jessie Virginia, Ph Ottawa 414 Locust 

Barker, Joe Lowery, CI Altamont. . .634 Sycamore 

Beatty, Clarence Neville, Sc Ottawa 734 S. Main 

Beatty, Joseph Harold, Sc Ottawa 734 S. Main 

Brown, Lulu Marie, Ph Ottawa 506 E. Fourth 

Church, Mary Naomi, Sc Ottawa 220 Cedar 

Daily, Pearl Crozier, Ph Ottawa 1004 S. Main 

Ellis, Phoebe Merchant, Ph Ottawa 434 Walnut 

Fear, Ada Mabel, Ph Waverly Charlton Cot 

Floyd, Louis, CI Sedan 633 Poplar 

Frink, Bessie, Sc Fairview 748 Poplar 

Froning, Margaret Elizabeth, Ph Frederic 825 Poplar 

Glass, John Neely, Ph Ottawa 206 E. Eighth 

Griffith, Valentine H., Sc Oberlin 633 Cedar 

Hardy, Cleo Clinton, CI Ottawa 503 Sycamore 

Harris, Jack, Ph Ottawa 406 Willow 

Hart, Lois May, CI Ottawa 526 Locust 

Holt, George H., CI Lookeba, Okla., 817 Poplar 

Hutchinson, Eva Jeanne, Ph Ottawa 406 Maple 

Lebo, Charles Frank, CI Ottawa 714 Poplar 

Lynch, Olive Edna, CI Ottawa 315 E. Third 

McDonald, William, H., Sc McLouth 720 S. Main 

McNutt, William Roy, CI Blue Mound, 734 Sycamore 

Osgood, Mary Ellen, Ph Sterling, Neb., 608 Locust 

Pugh, Earle Caldwell, CI Ottawa 414 Ash 

Putman, George Ellsworth, CI Ottawa 930 Hickory 

Reynard, Julia Winnifred, Ph Ottawa 733 Poplar 

Sheldon, Clarence Milton, Sc Ottawa 718 S. Cedar 

Simpson, Ruth, CI Emporia, Charlton Cottage 

Stine, Faye Louise, Ph Ottawa 704 Main 

Thomas, Mattie Julia, CI Ottawa 206 E. Eighth 

Teall, Raymond Edwin, Sc Oberlin 633 S. Cedar 

Turner, Minnie E., CI Colby 748 Poplar 

Williams, Robert R., Ph Ottawa 1104 Poplar 

Williams, Henry Mills, Sc Ottawa 1104 Poplar 

Williams, Paul, CI Ottawa ..1104 Poplar 

Woodburn, Frank Snyder, Sc Ottawa 609 Poplar 

THE FRESHMEN, CLASS OF 1909. 

Bell, Alice Kingsley, CI Ottawa 628 Mulberry 

Bolinger, Nellie Myrtle, Ph Bogue 733 Poplar 

Broderick, Delia Elizabeth, Ph Ottawa 517 Cedar 

Chaney, Roy Oscar, CI Ottawa 717 S. Main 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



131 



Cook, Estelle Marsh, Ph Ottawa 632 Cherry 

Cowan, Nina May, CI Ottawa 503 Ash 

Dale, Henry Clay, CI Galena 211 Main 

Ebaugh, Pearl May, CI McPherson 728 Poplar 

Ferris, Leslie A., Ph LaHarpe 825 Poplar 

Filson, Eva, CI Ottawa 119 E. Fifth 

Froning, Henry August, Ph Frederick 825 Poplar 

Gray, Fred James, Sc Ottawa 728 Poplar 

Grumbling, Emma Jessie, Sc Newton, Charlton Cottage 

Heritage, Ray, CI Gridley 324 Main 

Jones, J. Wilbur, CI Louisburg 701 Oak 

Keyser, Rufus, CI Union, Neb 610 Syc. 

Kinman, Nellie Florence, Ph Clay Center, Charlton Cot. 

Lawrence, Emilie Gertrude, CI Ottawa 410 Maple 

McCoy, Emma, CI Ottawa 823 Cedar 

Martin, Albert Henry, CI Galena 933 Hickory 

Mieir, Vinton Herman, CI Ottawa.. ..809 Sycamore 

Mitchell, Eugene Benjamin, Sc Eureka 436 Oak 

Mitchell, Harlan Rheuby, CI Ottawa 723 S. Main 

Monroe, Morton Glenn, Ph Fairview 737 Oak 

Parrish, Harry Bernard, Sc Ottawa 727 Oak 

Rairden, Lillian Harriet, Sc Clifton 804 Cedar 

Rice, Zelda Magdalena, CI Siloam, Ark 622 Syc. 

Ringer, Vera, Sc Ottawa 503 E. Fourth 

Rishel, Herbert Middlekauff, Sc Atoka, I. T 634 Syc. 

Rock, Jennie, CI Ottawa .... 603 Sycamore 

Rokes, James Leroy, Ph Onaga 622 Sycamore 

Shoemaker, Edna Rose, Sc Topeka. . ..622 Sycamore 

Smart, Georgia Ethel, Ph Ottawa 606 E. Fourth 

Smart, Lola Lucile, Ph Ottawa 606 E. Fourth 

Smith, Annabel, Ph Ottawa 723 Oak 

Sponsler, Mary Alice, Sc Homewood 423 Cedar 

Stallard, Mary Hannah, CI Onaga 824 S. Main 

Stallard, Simeon Harvey, Ph Onaga 622 Sycamore 

Stephenson, Edith Corinne, CI Ottawa 120 Elm 

Stewart, Glenville Edward, Sc Ottawa 815 Poplar 

Sunderlin, Myrtle Viola, Ph Ottawa 817 Poplar 

Ward, Agnes Gertrude, Ph Ottawa 9th & Locust 

Weedman, Walter Franklin, CI Ottawa 633 Sycamore 

Wilkinson, Carl I., Sc Asherville 433 Cedar 

Wilson, John Alexander, Sc Ottawa 819 Poplar 

Wilson, Clarence Ray, Sc Ottawa 819 Poplar 

Wirt, Joe William, Sc Belton, Mo., Charlton Cot. 

Wynne, Robert, CI Long Island... 519 Poplar 

THE COLLEGE SPECIALS. 

Adler, Corinne Elsie Ottawa 405 Willow 

Barr, Nellie Idell Oberlin 748 Poplar 



132 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Barr, Daisy Oberlin 748 Poplar 

Bayse, Walter Ellis Ottawa 731 S. Main 

Bird, Ross James Ottawa 731 Mulberry 

Brinkerhoff, Fred Walter Ottawa 518 Walnut 

Durboraw, Anna Ottawa 534 Locust 

Durboraw, Marjorie Ottawa 534 Locust 

Ellis, Clara Louise Iola 743 Poplar 

Finley, Jessie Ottawa ....710 N. Locust 

Fowler, Carl Rezin Ottawa 834 Poplar 

Gates, U. Grant LaCrosse ..214 E. Eighth 

Gilmore, Martha Frances Iola Charlton Cottage 

Good, Arra Leone Ottawa 634 Poplar 

Holmes, Una Anna Kan. City, Mo., Char. Cot. 

Johnson, Nelle Ottawa 628 Maple 

Jones, Willie Belle Parsons ....834 Sycamore 

Lindgren, Swen Oscar Ottawa 837 Cedar 

McClanahan, Cleo Ottawa 634 Sycamore 

McMillan, Bertha Warn ego 714 Poplar 

Masters, Ira Harwood Newton 734 Sycamore 

Moore, Leland Wightman Ottawa 504 Ash 

Morris, David Karl Ottawa 71? Oak 

Newton, Nora Mildred W T eir 704 Sycamore 

Ozenberger, George Triplette Ottawa 709 S. Cedar 

Riley, Darrel Dane Leoti North Locust 

Samuel, Mamie Edna Rulo, Neb., 743 Poplar 

Shaw, Robert Whiteman Stafford 814 Poplar 

Shomber, Cecilia Homewood, 206 E. Eighth 

Shoufler, Edward Everett Jewell 122 Park 

Stith, Leon Raymond Ottawa . . . 421 S. Hickory 

Wilson, Delia Grace Mound Valley, Charl. Cot. 

Wood, Mary Ottawa 



THE ACADEMY. 

THE GRADUATING CLASS. 

Dale, Henry Clay, CI Galena 211 Main 

Gallagher, Ruby Violet, Ph. Lancaster 417 Locust 

Graves, Ruth, Ph Ottawa 410 Hickory 

Jensen, Albert, CI Ottawa 321 E. Fourth 

Kling, Ethel Phoebe, Ph Ottawa 737 Cedar 

Liston, Oscar Earl, CI Lane 211 Main 

McClanahan, Cleo, CI Ottawa 634 Sycamore 

Ringer, Vera, Sc Ottawa 503 E. Fourth 

Stewart, Glenville Edward, Sc Ottawa 815 Poplar 

Truex, Iva Mae, Sc Hamlin 743 Poplar 

Truex, Spencer Allen, Sc Hamlin 737 Cedar 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



133 



Weedman, Walter Franklin, CI Ottawa 519 Poplar 

Wilkinson, Carl Isaac, Sc Asherville 727 Cedar 

Wynne, Robert, Ph Long Island ..519 Poplar 

THE SENIOR CLASS OF 1906. 

Bell, Walter Roderic, Sc Ottawa 424 Poplar 

Brown, Don, CI Ottawa 701 Oak 

Carpenter, Carlos, Sc Ottawa ....321 E. Fourth 

Johnson, Edith May, Ph Ottawa 737 Cedar 

Miller, Charles Leroy, Ph Ottawa 717 N. Cedar 

Murphey, Chester Arthur, Sc Anthony 701 Oak 

Patten, Fern Lillian, CI Richmond, Charlton Cot. 

Pickerel, Fay, Sc Ottawa 402 Oak 

Price, Clair Sandon, CI Ottawa 410 Hickory 

Robertson, William Roy, CI Preston 819 Poplar 

Stewart, Jessie, Ph Ottawa 746 Poplar 

Stith, Roscoe Conkling, Sc Ottawa 421 Hickory 

Wood, DeLoss Tilton, Sc Ottawa 1040 Hickory 

Woods, Cora Edna, CI Ottawa 206 E. Eighth 

THE MIDDLE CLASS OF 1907. 

Adamson, Fred Ottawa 829 Poplar 

Anthony, Lynne Wellsville, 621 Sycamore 

Pell, Roy Ernest Ottawa 424 Poplar 

Bolinger, Hugh J Bogue 830 Oak 

Bolinger, John W Ottawa 830 Oak 

Chappell, William Martin Ottawa 804 Sycamore 

Coen, Mary Lydia Ottawa 206 E. Eighth 

Field, Samuel Adam McPherson ...728 Poplar 

Gordon, Fred Roscoe Utica 804 Sycamore 

Keen, Olive Amy Ottawa 621 Sycamore 

Lovette, John Lamb Wellsville . . 633 Sycamore 

McProud, Ernest Hutchen Ottawa . . 13th & Hickory 

Manley, Frank William Ottawa 633 Poplar 

Morrison, Mabel Elizabeth Phillipsburg. . .733 Poplar 

Ober, Reuben Hurd Ottawa 335 Cedar 

Okeson, Bertha E Fairview 748 Poplra 

Okeson, Cleorge B Fairview 748 Poplar 

Parker, Pearl Wellsville ..621 Sycamore 

Pease, Loren Howard Richards, Mo., 716 Syc. 

Sloan. Mary Edna Stilwell 814 Willow 

Smith, Iris Leonore Ottawa ....521 Mulberry 

Staley, Verne Edwin Wellsville ..603 Sycamore 

Veeh, Martha Elizabeth Stuttgart 733 Poplar 

Weedman, Bessie Ottawa 633 Sycamore 

Wolf, Max Abbott Ottawa West Seventh 

Wood, William Hiram D Ottawa 825 Poplar 



134 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



THE JUNIOR CLASS OF 1908. 

Adamson, Rosa May Ottawa 829 Poplar 

Bradley Mabelle Ottawa 535 Mulberry 

Bower, Ross William Ottawa 13th & Cedar 

Bushnell, Jennie Pomona 746 Poplar 

Christie, Viola Cedarvale ..621 Sycamore 

Dudgeon, Floyd Richard Earleton, 8th & Sycamore 

Fellows, Florence May Topeka 1004 S. Main 

Frink, Spencer Fairview 748 Poplar 

Gamble, Joe Stanley Ottawa R. R. No. 1 

Garnett, Mary Katherine Latham Charlton Cot. 

Gilley, Allie Ottawa 424 Hickory 

Green, Beulah Warren Homewood, Charlton Cot. 

Holt, Howard Judson Lookeba. O. T., 817 Poplar 

Hyde, Walter Alexander Matkins, Mo., . . 717 Oak 

Johnson, Irene Ottawa, Charlton Cottage 

Johnson, Sophia Katherine Randall, Charlton Cottage 

Kimble, Lola Inez Ottawa 823 Olive 

Martin, Elmer H Blue Mound, 804 Sycamore 

Mieir, Tobias Clarkson Ottawa 809 Sycamore 

Monroe, Ethel Irene Fairview 841 Poplar 

Moon, Mabel Gertrude Stilwell Poplar 

Olson, Josephine Otelia Clyde 837 Cedar 

O'Neil, Charles Logan Ottawa 615 Sycamore 

Parker, Angie Gilbert Ottawa 521 Maple 

Parker* Ernest Robert Ottawa 521 Maple 

Pottorf, Daniel Albert Hutchinson Science Bldg. 

Price, Hattie May Ottawa 410 Hickory 

Riggs, Joe A Texico, 111., Science Bldg. 

Thayer, Flora Alice Ottawa 634 Sycamore 

Whitson, Cordelia Claire Farlinville 417 Locust 



THE SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Barker, Blanche Lucille Ottawa 933 Hickory 

Belle, Maude Ottawa 603 Oak 

Bird, Charity Adeline Ottawa 731 Mulberry 

Borders, Hugh Louisburg 701 S. Oak 

Elliott, Charles Princeton 737 Cedar 

Foster, Frank Orting, Wash., ..633 Oak 

Haynes, Lillie Maude Ottawa 840 Main 

Haynes, Eugene Leslie Ottawa 840 Main 

Hoy, Ora Maude Long Island ..837 Cedar 

Kasey, Hugh Field McPherson . . . 728 Poplar 

Lyon, Frank Andrew Fredonia, N. Ottawa Hotel 

McHenry, Ethel Bell Paola 804 Sycamore 

Meeker, William Bently Meeker, O. T., 703 Poplar 

Meredith, Grace Osceola, Mo., Charl. Cot 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



135 



Miller, Amy Fay Graham, Mo., 720 S. Main 

Osborn, Richard Oglesby Paola 810 Poplar 

Over, David Edward Ottawa 1313 Poplar 

Robinson, Roy Emerson Ottawa 506 Poplar 

Sallee, Mary Lou Ada Ottawa 924 S. Cedar 

Shultz, Edith Adeline Ottawa 13th & Cedar 

Stokes, Morris Jefferson Ottawa 135 S. Oak 

Tedrow, Minnie Elsa Ottawa 523 Hickory 

Whiteman, Percy Lee, Ph. Sedgwick . . Charlton Cot. 

Wright, Henry Willard LaCygne . . . Crane House 



THE NORMAL SCHOOL 

CANDIDATES FOR THE TEACHER'S DIPLOMA, AND FOR 
THE STATE TEACHER'S CERTIFICATE. 



AuDoi-t, r laeiia. 


Maupin, Hattie 


iiLCIilSOil, XvOSS. 


A T /"> t~\~\T Anno 


-DcctCLL, JUcllcl. 


ivitjri liiiciii, ivia uue 


Bird Gracp 


Mitchell, Cynthia 


Brown, Lulu 


Morse, Alice 


Bureau, Ernest 


Newcomb, Justina 


Collett, Ernest 


Parrish, Augusta 


Constant, Nita 


Ramage, Olive 


Ebaugh, Clarence 


Rathbun, Beulah 


Estabrook, Claire 


Rathbun, Laura 


Evans, Foster 


Remington, Jessie 


Grass, Dora 


Reynard, Winifred 


Harrison, Bruce M. 


Russell, Olive 


Hildreth, Eva 


Samuel, Mamie 


Hoy, Oda 


Shive, Ida 


Hutchins, Vivian 


Smith, Mary 


Jones, Elgie J. 


Speaks, Edgarda 


Jones, Harry H. 


Stannard, Elizabeth 


Judy, Nera 


Sutherland, Grace 


Kimmell, Ruby 


Taylor, Evaline 


King, E. E. 


Thompson, Claude 


King, H. L. 


Upham, Burl 


Larson, Esther 


VanCleve, Hattie 


Lawrence, Eldred 


Veeh, Mary 


Lieurance, Leota 


Wood, Norman 


Manley, Charles 


Wood, Mrs. W. R. 



THE FINE ARTS DEPARTMENTS. 

STUDENTS IN THE VOCAL DEPARTMENT. 

Alsop, George E Bluemound 

Alwes, Catherine Ottawa 



136 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Angell, Edgar M Ottawa 

Avenarius, Lena Ottawa 

Baughman, Frank Ottawa 

Bird, Grace Ottawa 

Bird, Charity Ottawa 

Black, Elva Ottawa 

Bower, Ross W Ottawa 

Branson, Helen Ottawa 

Bunn, Gertrude Ottawa 

Caldwell, Mamie Ottawa 

Cloon, Elva LeLoup 

Dale, H. Clay Galena 

Deasy, Nell Ottawa 

Finley, Jessie Ottawa 

Fitch, Mrs. E. H Ottawa 

Froning, Margaret E Frederick 

Good, Leone Ottawa 

Haberly, Anna , Ottawa 

Hampton, Mina Ottawa 

Haynes, Lillian Ottawa 

Heck, Essie Ottawa 

Holmes, Una Medicine Lodge 

Howell, Amy B Ottawa 

fljde, Walter A Matkins, Mo. 

Johnson, Anna Ottawa 

Juleson, Sydney Ottawa 

Keith, Clara Ottawa 

King, May Ottawa 

Kroesch, Anna Lorraine 

Lawrence, Emilie Ottawa 

Lawrence, Ruth i Ottawa 

Leeper, Truman Ottawa 

McAdow, Helen Ottawa 

Melander, Beda A Ottawa 

Meredith, Grace Ottawa 

Messick, Clara L Howard 

Miller, Fayette Graham, Mo. 

Monbeck, W. E Burroak 

Okerberg, Martha Ottawa 

Osborne, R. L Ottawa 

Peterson, Anna Ottawa 

Rippey, Inez Edna Stafford 

Rose, Grace L Ottawa 

Shade, Grace Ottawa 

Smith, Annabelle Ottawa 

Southwick, Rodney E Wichita 

Sweet, Mrs. George , Ottawa 

Troxell, Mrs. Dora Ottawa 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



137 



VanCleve, C. W Ottawa 

Veeh, Mary A Stuttgart 

Wells, Byron Ottawa 

Whiteman, Percy L Sedgwick 

Wible, Elizabeth Ottawa 

Wright, Walter C Ottawa 



STUDENTS IN THE PIANO DEPARTMENT. 

Alexander, Pearl Ottawa 

Barnes, Gertrude Ottawa 

Barnett, Rose Ft. Scott 

Bayse, Lottie Ottawa 

Bass, Ruth Ottawa 

Branson, Helen Ottawa 

Broderick, Josephine Ottawa 

Broderson, Clara May Ottawa 

Beach, Clara Melvern 

Beckwith, Sadie Ottawa 

Blaine, Mary Lena Ottawa 

Buckley, Clyde Ottawa 

Bunn, Elizabeth Ottawa 

Carpenter, Pansy Ottawa 

Chubbick, Frances Ottawa 

Clark, Merle Ottawa 

Clark, Ray Ottawa 

Clark, Albert George Osage City 

Claypool, Phyllis Ottawa 

Confare, Lessie Ottawa 

Constant, Nita Ottawa 

Cowan, Hazel Ottawa 

Cowan, Delia Ottawa 

Crain, Clara Ottawa 

Curl, Faith Ottawa 

Curtis, Charlotte Ottawa 

Daily, Pearl Ottawa 

Davenport, Elinor Ottawa 

Davenport, Walter Ottawa 

Deitrick, Elsie Mabel Richmond 

Dills, Kenneth Ottawa 

Drake, Dorris M Ottawa 

Dunlap, Gertrude Ottawa 

Dunn, Myotte Ottawa 

Elliott, Mrs. Ida Princeton 

Ellis, Phoebe Ottawa 

Esterly, Louise Ottawa 

Fear, Ada Waverly 

Foy, Myrtle Ottawa 

Gawthrop, Mrs. Mabel Williamsburg 



138 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Good, Arra Leone Ottawa 

Green, Daisy Ottawa 

Green, Beulah Warren Homewood 

Haberly, Elizabeth Ottawa 

Hanna, Ruth Althea Richter 

Harris, Gertrude Ottawa 

Harris, Ilo Ottawa 

Hart, Lois Ottawa 

Hersch, Iva Venda Ottawa 

Howard, May Ottawa 

Howell, Amy B Princeton 

Hutchinson, Eva Ottawa 

Ice, Narka Mound Valley 

Jenks, Leland Ottawa 

Jewell, Mrs. Clifton Ottawa 

Johnson, Irene Ottawa 

Kassens, Mary Silome Anthony 

Kitchen, Martha Lane Lane 

Kittle, Helen Ottawa 

Larson, Ruth Ottawa 

Litton, Sadie Peabody 

Litton, Myrtle Peabody 

McMillan, Bertha Wamego 

McGuire, Zada Ottawa 

Marsh, Sadie Ottawa 

Marsh, Minnie Ottawa 

Marsh, May Ottawa 

Marsh, Mack Ottawa 

Marshall, Edna Richter 

Maxwell, Myrtle Excelsior Springs 

Moise, Roena Ottawa 

Moon, Mabel Overbrook 

Morgan, Miriam Ottawa 

Morrison, Mabel Phillipsburg 

Mulkey, Mabel Ottawa 

Newton, Nora Weir 

Odell, D'Arline Ottawa 

Odell, Azna Ottawa 

Owens, Alma Ottawa 

Parker, Pearl Paola 

Patton, Fern Richmond 

Peck, Mabelle Ottawa 

Ramsey, Mrs. Una Howell Ottawa 

Rippey, Inez Stafford 

Rock, Jennie Ottawa 

Settliff, William Ottawa 

Settliff, Eva Ottawa 

Shaffer, Jessie Ottawa 

Shinn, Tabitha Ottawa 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



139 



Shiras, Katherine Ottawa 

Shomber, Cecil Homewood 

Smart, Euphemia Ottawa 

Smith, Eugenia Ottawa 

Smith, Perie Eldora Ottawa 

Stanard, Mabel Ottawa 

Stanard, Ella Ottawa 

Stanard, Pearl Ottawa 

Stickley, Franklin Ottawa 

Stith, Leon Ottawa 

Stokely, Edna Ottawa 

Stratton, Grace Marion Ottawa 

Styles, Lelia Ottawa 

Tanner, Harriet Princeton 

Torrence, Bina Lucas 

Veeh, Margaret Stuttgart 

Veeh, Martha Stuttgart 

Weedman, Mabel Richter 

Weston, Gertrude Ottawa 

Wiggins, Glen Ottawa 

Wilson, Vera Margaret Richmond 

Wilson, Delia Mound Valley 

Wyble, Rebecca W Ottawa 

Wyble, Elizabeth Ottawa 

Zimmerman, Fredia Ottawa 



STUDENTS IN THE DEPARTMENTS OF MUSICAL THEORY. 

\ 

Beatty, May Ottawa 

Confare, Lessie Ottawa 

Daily, Pearl Ottawa 

Ellis, Clara Iola 

Good, Arra Leone Ottawa 

Holmes, Una Medicine Lodge 

Hageman, Pearl Clifton 

Ice, Narka Mound Valley 

King, May Ottawa 

Leeper, Florence Ottawa 

Meredith, Grace Ottawa 

Messick, Clara L Howard 

Mclntyre, Annette Downs 

Martin, Josephine Garnett 

Nadler, Carrie LaHarpe 

Newton, Eva Ottawa 

Newton, Nora Weir 

Owens, Alma Ottawa 

Peck, Mabelle Ottawa 

Ramsey, Mrs. Una H Ottawa 

Rippey, Inez Stafford 



140 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Samuel, Mamie Rulo, Neb. 

Shinn, Tabitha Ottawa 

Shomber, Cecil Ottawa 

Spence, Claribel Valley Falls 

Torrence, Bina Lucas 

Wilson, Delia Mound Valley 

STUDENTS IN THE ORGAN DEPARTMENT. 

Ferguson, Mary Ottawa 

Hayer, Lillian Ottawa 

Hazer, Pearl Ottawa 

Hughes, Ella Grace Ottawa 

Moore, Delia Ottawa 

Morgan, Clara Ottawa 

STUDENTS IN THE VIOLIN DEPARTMENT. 

Bass, Ellen Ottawa 

Beach, Ninona Ottawa 

Nelson, Mary Ottawa 

Peck, Norma Ottawa 

Reed, Harvey Ottawa 

Redmond, Roscoe Ottawa 

Sloan, Edna Stilwell 

Stannard, Mabel Ottawa 

Stephenson, Corinne Olathe 

Veeh, Martha Stuttgart 

Veeh, Mary Stuttgart 

Woods, Edna Ottawa 

STUDENTS ON THE MANDOLIN AND THE GUITAR. 

Emery, Eva Norwood 

Gates, Ralph Ottawa 

Henry, Mina Rantoul 

Keith, Walter Ottawa 

Ozenberger, Frank Ottawa 

Taylor, Claude Ottawa 

STUDENTS ON REED AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS. 

Allison, Raymond, Clarinet Ottawa 

Barton, Clyde, Clarinet Ottawa 

Barnett, S. H., Clarinet Ottawa 

Burk, Carl, Clarinet Ottawa, 

Barnes, H. L., Clarinet Ottawa 

Crain, O. W., Clarinet Ottawa 

Clark, Hal, Clarinet Ottawa 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



141 



Daniels, Earl, Clarinet Ottawa 

Eldridge, Byron, Clarinet Ottawa 

Grey, James, Clarinet Ottawa 

Hughes, Clinton, Clarinet Ottawa 

Hess, Erwin, Clarinet Ottawa 

Hampton, Logan, Clarinet Ottawa 

Latimer, Ross, Clarinet Ottawa 

Nelson, Eddie, Clarinet Ottawa 

Peterson, Lee, Clarinet Ottawa 

Pittman, Bert, Clarinet Ottawa 

Pierson, Hilbert, Clarinet Ottawa 

Putnam, Luther, Clarinet Ottawa 

Robinson, W. M., Clarinet Ottawa 

Warley, R. B., Clarinet Ottawa 

Wasson, J. S., Clarinet Ottawa 

Wharton, Lloyd, Clarinet Ottawa 

Ober, R. H., Piccolo and flute Ottawa 

Siemantel, Edward, Piccolo and flute Ottawa 

Grimes, G. M., Saxaphone Ottawa 

Bass, Walter, Cornet Ottawa 

Mills, C. W., Cornet Ottawa 

Moore, Merlin, Cornet Ottawa 

Okerberg, John, Cornet Ottawa 

Stone, A. H., Cornet Ottawa 

Smith, Jean, Cornet Ottawa 

Stahl, Ralph, Cornet Ottawa 

Zimmerman, Warren, Cornet Ottawa 

Warble, Charles, Cornet Ottawa 

Broderson, A. J., Horns Ottawa 

Marsh, Charles L., Horns Ottawa 

Stickley, Jay, Horns Ottawa 

Wright, C. H., Horns Ottawa 

Stokley, Orber, Trombone Ottawa 

Anderson, George, Baritone Ottawa 

Baughman, Frank, Bass Ottawa 

Russel, Alonzo, Bass Ottawa 

Harron, P. W., Drums and traps Ottawa 

Lucas, Raymond, Drums and traps Ottawa 



THE DEPARTMENT OF ART AND APPLIED DESIGN. 

Beach, Leila Ottawa, 912 Cedar 

Coen, Mary Ottawa, 206 E. Eighth 

Dring, Flora Chicago, 820 Cedar 

Field, Samuel McPherson, ...728 Poplar 

Floyd, Louis Sedan, 633 S. Poplar 

Frink, Bessie Fairview, 733 Poplar 

Good, Leone ., Ottawa, 634 Poplar 

Hamel, L Ottawa, 125 Elm 



142 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Haigh, Glenn Ottawa, 428 Cherry- 
Hoy, Oda Long Island 837 Cedar 

Kasey, Hugh Ottawa, 728 Poplar 

McAdow, Ida Ottawa, 633 Willow 

McHenry, Ethel Ottawa, 804 Sycamore 

McNutt, W. R Bluemound, 734 Sycamore 

Monbeck, W. E Eurroak, ... 920 S. Cedar 

Olson, Josephine Clyde, 827 Cedar 

Parrish, Augusta Ottawa, 727 Oak 

Rairden, Lillian Clifton, 804 Cedar 

Ringer, Vera Ottawa, 503 E. Fourth 

VanCleve, Stella Ottawa, 920 S. Cedar 

Wiggins, Pearl Sylvia, 713 E. Fifth 

Wirt, Joseph Belton, Mo., Charlton Cot. 

Wood, Edna O Ottawa, 206 E. Eighth 



THE DEPARTMENT OF ELOCUTION. 



Lou Ada Sallee, Special Course Ottawa 

Beulah Green, Special Course Homewood 

Catherine Garnett, Special Course Latham 

George Ozenberger, Special Course Ottawa 

Charlotte Smart, Special Course Ottawa 



THE COMMERCIAL COLLEGE. 
STENOGRAPHY COURSE. 

Alwes Lena Ottawa, 109 Poplar 

Anglemyer, Grace Evalena Centropolis, . . 814 Poplar 

Anderson, George Ottawa 102 Elm 

Arnold, Cora Edith Ottawa 737 Oak 

Barton, Essie Bell Ottawa, . . . 747 Princeton 

Barner, Anna Belle Ottawa, 134 Elm 

Beachy, Emma Ottawa, . . . 508 Sycamore 

Beeler, Fred Heart Ottawa 331 Sycamore 

Bell, Maud Olive Ottawa, 603 Oak 

Bristow, Fred Otis Osawatomie . . 845 Cedar 

Bristow, Bennie Harrison Osawatomie, . . 845 Cedar 

Brown, Regina, Mary Pomona, 534 Maple 

Brown, Katie Frances Ottawa 115 Cedar 

Bunn, Charles Miller Ottawa, 415 Cedar 

Burk, James Carl McPherson, 728 Poplai 

Carmean, Mattie Amelia Paola 817 Poplar 

Cartzdafner, Harry Lee Osawatomie, . 820 E. 7th 

Cluff, Harry Eugene Lyndon, . 1024 N. Poplar 

Cox, Rose May Waverly, 421 Poplar 

Cox, Grover David Waverly, 421 Poplar 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



143 



Cook, George Ottawa, . . . 624 Sycamore 

Cornell, Mattie Ottawa, 804 Oak 

Daniel, Cyrus Earl Ottawa, 745 Cedar 

Dye, Clark Blue Mound . . . 804 Cedar 

Ehrlich, Cassia Marion 844 Cedar 

Elzea, Lloyd Emerson Rantoul, 323 Maple 

Ewalt, Estelle Vera Ottawa, 717 Main 

Flora, Sidney Louis Ottawa, . . . 522 Mulberry 

Florence, John Leslie Yates Center, . 521 Poplar 

Frazier, Alice May Ottawa, 746 Poplar 

Garrett, Morse Ottawa, 204 Elm 

Getty, Carrie Ottawa, ... 428 N. Cherry 

Gibson, Maude Ann Baldwin, 814 Poplar 

Gordon, William Richard Utica, Crane House 

Gottman, Fred William Ottawa, . . . 508 Sycamore 

Grant, Marguerite Helen Ottawa, 113 Hickory 

Haigh, Anna Mabel Ottawa, 428 Cherry 

Hardy, Cleo Clinton Ottawa, . . . 506 Sycamore 

Hargrave, John Ottawa, 810 Oak 

Harris, Gertrude Josephine Ottawa, 406 Locust 

Hettinger, Lulu Alice Ottawa, 806 King 

Heath, Francis Earl Ottawa, . . . 622 Sycamore 

Hiatt, Fluta Ellen Morrill, Charlton Cottage 

Higgins, Lola Lucille Ottawa, 512 Willow 

Hinderliter, William Andrew Ottawa, ... R. F. D. No. 5 

Hornbeck, Eunice Ottawa, 420 Cedar 

Houser, Edith Nora Ottawa, 524 Oak 

Hull, Leora Anna Asherville, Charlton Cot. 

Hughes, Eunice May Ottawa, . . . 720 Sycamore 

Jester, Jessie Pearl Marysville, Charlton Cot. 

Johnson, Hattie Ottawa, . . . 313 E. Second 

Jones, Linnie Mae New Murdock, 810 Poplar 

Juleson, Sidney Dean Ottawa, 226 Walnut 

Kassens, Vivian Mary Salome Anthony, Charlton Cottage 

Kirchner, Clara Marguerite Baldwin, .... 814 Poplar 

Kline, Wilson Lewis Georgetown, Ken. 837 M. 

Koenig, Mary Agnes Ottawa, ... R. F. D. No. 4 

Litton, Myrtle Edith Peabody, 728 Poplar 

Litton, Sadie Irene Peabody, . . . 728 Poplar 

Lockwood Nina Ottawa, . . . 1104 College 

Lockwood, Anna Hattie Ottawa^ 113 Main 

Martin, Faith Catherine Ottawa, 726 Poplar 

Miller, Grace Ellen Rantoul, 746 Poplar 

Miller, Lena Alma Ottawa, 516 Oak 

Meeker, Julia Anna Meeker, Okla. 703 Poplar 

Meeker, William Bentley Meeker, Okla. 703 Poplar 

Moore, Howard Ottawa, . . 623 N. Main 



144 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Moore, Leland Wightman Ottawa, 504 Ash 

Mount, Dora Mabel Ottawa, ... R. F. D. No. 4 

McDowell, Agnes Mary Le Roy, 748 Poplar 

McCullough, Irma Blanche Ottawa, 228 Cedar 

Nusbaum, Lucreta Belle Ottawa, 428 Walnut 

Ober, Allace Ottawa, . . . 1042 Walnut 

Ober, Elnore Belle Ottawa, . . . 1042 Walnut 

Owens, Blanche Elizabeth Ottawa, 924 Cedar 

Patton, Madge Blanche Dighton, Charlton Cottage 

Peterson, Marie Ottawa, 525 Oak 

Parrish, Harry Bernard Ottawa 727 Oak 

Polite, Bessie Myrtle Osawatomie, . . . 122 Park 

Rule, Anna Lee Ottawa, ... R. F. D. No. 2 

Samuel, Mamie Rulo, 733 Poplar 

Scott, Don Wallace Ottawa, 334 Maple 

Shoemaker, Anna Cordelia Ottawa, 415 Main 

Shombers, Clara Edith Homewood, 206 E. Eighth 

Shipp, Irene Georgia Ottawa, 811 Ash 

Spears, James Glenn Homewood, 847 Princeton 

Sponsler, Mary Alice Homewood, . . . 423 Cedar 

Stites, Carth Elzie Jetmore, 823 Olive 

Stokely, Ober Guy Ottawa, ... 206 E. Eighth 

Taylor, Lettie May Ottawa, ... 206 E, Eighth 

Thomas, Ella Sherman Ottawa, 934 Hickory 

Tripp, Carrie Ottawa, . . . 430 Sycamore 

Turner, Mildred May Stafford, Charlton Cottage 

Van Cleve, Althea Ottawa, 920 Cedar 

Veeh, Marguerite Barbara Stuttgart, . . . 743 Poplar 

Veburg, Carl Amasa Ottawa, ... R. F. D. No. 9 

Verlin, John Ottawa, 103 Locust 

Whiteford, Susan Osawatomie, . . 228 Cedar 

Wilkins, Opal Frances Ottawa, 820 West Second 

Wynkoop, Mary Frances Ottawa, 810 Oak 

COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

Allen, Nellie Ward Ottawa, . . . R. F. D. No. 4 

Barnes, Harold Leonard Ottawa, 635 Locust 

Barton, Carl Milton Ottawa, ... 747 Princeton 

Brandenberger, William Leonard . . . Halstead, ... 633 Hickory 

Bright, Harry Lee Junction City . 804 Cedar 

Brunner, Earl Ottawa, . . 622 Sycamore 

Cellers, Bertha Evelyn Ottawa, . . 624 Sycamore 

Charles, Clyde Blue Mound, . . 804 Cedar 

Chapin, Harry Albert Ottawa, 625 Cherry 

Elkington, Oscar Ottawa, . R. F. D. No. 9 

Embry, Harold Erie Ottawa, . R. F. D. No. 4 

Fowler, Carl Rezin Ottawa, 841 Poplar 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



145 



Gamble, Joe Stanley Ottawa, ... R. F. D. No. 3 

Hoffman, William Preston, 81.9 Poplar 

Hoffman, Ira Preston, 819 Poplar 

Ingle, Oscar Edward Baldwin, 121 Main 

Legg, Wellington Ottawa, 609 Maple 

Logan, Chester Alexander Williamsburg, 123 Hickory 

Lutz, Charles Benjamin Baldwin, ... 516 W. Fifth 

Lyman, Charles Morgan El Paso, Texas, 421 Elm 

Mullarky, Ben Randall, . . . 334 Sycamore 

Oakley, William Thomas Ottawa, . . 15th and Cedar 

Oldham, Albert William Paola, 825 Poplar 

O'Neal, Charles Springfield, Mo., 731 Oak 

Pease, Loren Howard Richards Mo. 716 Syc'm're 

Peck, Roy Bacon Ottawa, 224 Oak 

Peterson, Lee Alva Ottawa, 225 Cedar 

Philippi, Nort Edward Ottawa, 134 Maple 

Pierson, Arthur Ottawa, 619 Oak 

Rabeck, Clarence Claude Ottawa, 633 Cedar 

Reese, Thomas Daniel Pittsburg, . . 83 4Poplai 

Robinson, George Lewis Ottawa, 506 Poplar 

Stalcup, Charles Cleveland Preston, . . . 633 Hickory 

Stickley, Jay Leslie Ottawa, . 230 W. Seventh 

Wollard, Cody Imes, 622 Sycamore 

York, Milton Huron, S. D., 313 Cherry 



TELEGRAPH COURSE. 

Brown, William Thomas Ottawa, 621 Locust 

Campbell, Eldon Harrison Ottawa, 11th & Burrough 

Campbell, Erwin Thomas Ottawa, 11th & Burrough 

Elliot, Charles Princeton, 800 Main 

Eshelman, Millard Russell Ottawa, 828 Main 

Finley, Miles Rush Pittsburg, . . . 834 Poplai 

McDowell, Orville Williamsburg, 622 S'c'mr'e 

Morgan, Alva Merl Ottawa, 616 Willow 

Morehead, John Brevard Manzanola, Col., 122 Park 

Robinson, Roy Ottawa, 506 Poplar 

Whitebread, Olin Harvey Ottawa, 404 Ash 



146 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS. 

THE COLLEGE. 

Postgraduates 12 

Graduates of 1905 29 

Senior Class 26 

Junior Class 21 

Sophomore Class 37 

F-'reshman Class 47 

Special Students 34 — 206 

THE ACADEMY. 

Graduates of 1905 14 

Senior Class 14 

Middle Class .....26 

Junior Class 30 

Special Students 24 — 108 

THE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Candidates for Teacher's Diploma 52 — 52 

THE SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 
MUSIC. 

Voice 56 

Piano 114 

Harmony, Theory, and Counterpoint 26 

Organ 6 

Violin 12 

Mandolin and Guitar 6 

Reed and Brass Instruments 45 

ART. 

General Illustration 17 

Mechanical Drawing 6 

ELOCUTION. 

Required Courses 73 

Special Work 5—366 

THE COMMERCIAL COLLEGE. 

Stenography Course 110 

Commercial Course 36 

Telegraphy Course 11 — 147 



THE GRAND TOTAL 879 

LESS REPEATED NAMES 229 

THE NET TOTAL 650 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



147 



PART VI. THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 



THE OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. 



PROF. W. B. WILSON ... 
MISS GLADYS ALDERMAN 
MR. JOHN O. EVANS 



.President 
. Secretary 
Treasurer 



The Alumni Member of the Board of Trustees. 



REV. J. T. CRAWFORD. 



Appointments for 1906. 



J. WHITNEY EBY .. 
JENNIE E. MEEKER 



Orator 
. . Poet 



The regular meetings of the association are held on the 
Tuesday immediately preceding Commencement day. The 
alumni exercises consist of an open meeting at ten o'clock in 
the morning, held in the auditorium of the Baptist church, and 
of a banquet and reception to the members of the graduating 
class, given in the evening at nine o'clock the same day. All 
alumni and former students are urged, in so far as possible, to 
affiliate themselves with this organization, and to keep them- 
selves in touch with the school. 

The University will be glad to be informed of any changes 
in residence or employment which its graduates may make. The 
aim of the school is to follow every one of its graduates through- 
out life, and to foster and support by all legitimate means, the 
prosperity and usefulness of its sons and daughters. A com- 
plete list of the graduates of Ottawa University, together with 
their present addresses and occupations will be published in the 
course of the current year. 



The University has recently organized, and now has in ac- 
tive operation a bureau of recommendation, of which the presi- 
dent of the University is chairman. The object of the bureau 
is to assist in every way feasible and legitimate, by recommend- 
ation, correspondence, nomination and otherwise, its students 



THE BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATION. 



148 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



and graduates in securing such positions of confidence and trust 
as their record and past accomplishments may entitle them to 
hold. The service of the bureau is placed unreservedly at the 
disposal of the alumni and former students of Ottawa Univer- 
sity. No fee, except a nominal one to defray postage and neces- 
sary expenses will be charged for services rendered. The work 
of the bureau is planned to be entirely co-operative, and the help 
of every alumnus is asked to make the movement a success. 

THE BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATIONS. 

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY Chairman 

THE REGISTRAR OF THE UNIVERSITY Recorder 

THE SECRETARY OF THE FACULTY..... Secretary 

Communications addressed to "The Bureau of Recommenda- 
tion of Ottawa University" will receive immediate and careful 
attention. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



149 



PART VII. 



THE PROGRAM, AND DEGREES, PRIZES, DIPLOMAS 
AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN CONNECTION 
WITH THE FORTIETH ANNUAL COM- 
MENCEMENT OF OTTAWA 
UNIVERSITY. 



THE PROGRAM OF THE UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT. 
June 7» 1905, 10 a. m. in the First Baptist Church. 



Organ Prelude Mrs. W. D. Detwiler 

Invocation Rev. S. E. Price 

Piano Duet Miss Pearl Chenoweth, Miss Harrison 

Midsummer Night's Dream" (Mendelssohn). 

THE COMMENCEMENT ORATION, REV. THOMAS S. YOUNG 

VOCAL DUET, MISS LEONE GOOD, PROF. W. D. DETWILER, 
"Come With Me." 

THE CONFERRING OF DEGREES. 

THE AWARDING OF PRIZES. 

UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

THE BENEDICTION. 



THE CANDIDATES FOR THE COLLEGE DEGREES. 
Bachelor of Arts. 

Name. Present Address. 

Alpheus Corydon Banta Oberlin, Kansas 

Roy Henry Barrett, Chicago 111., 113 S. Hall, Chicago University 
Fred William Gottman Kansas City, Mo., 925 Central 



150 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Parker Lincoln Kelly Newton Center, Mass. 

Laura Belle Rathbun Primghar, Iowa 

Ida Belle Shive Burrton, Kansas 

Earl Shultz Chicago, 111., 221 Hampden Court 

Lloyd Casey Smith Rochester, New York 

Elizabeth Susan Stanard Hopkinton, Iowa 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Catherine Sophia Alwes Ottawa, Kansas 

Florence Esther Beach Ottawa, Kansas 

John Keenyon Boyd Altamont, Kansas 

Samuel Bevington Ellis Brown Valley, Minn. 

Homer Field Goodwin Kansas City, Kansas 

Nera Margaret Judy Ottawa, Kansas 

Esther Sophia Larson Houston, Minn. 

Drusilla Adeline Moses Ottawa, Kansas 

Justina (Newcomb) Morse Chicago, 111, 5800 Park Ave. 

William Fletcher Robbins Hamilton, New York 

Mary Elvira Smith LaCygne, Kansas 

Alice Mary Williams Chillicothe, Mo. 

Mabel Wren Ottawa, Kansas 

Bachelor of Science. 

Bruce Magill Harrison Murphyboro, 111. 

Beulah Rathbun Farmer City, 111. 

Jessie Belle Remington Osawatomie, Kansas 

E valine Moore Taylor Pine Island, Minn. 

Claude Francis Thompson Sparta, Wis. 

Burl Nathaniel Upham Ottawa, Kansas 

Arthur Esterly Willis Ottawa, Kansas 

Bachelor of Music. 

Arra Leone Good Ottawa, Kansas 

Master of Arts. 

Alvah Bing Way, A.B., '97 Petaluma, Cal., 684 Ky. street. 

Master of Philosophy. 

Belle Bolinger Way, Ph.B., '97, Petaluma, Cal., 684 Ky. street. 

Blanche (Willis) Beach, B.L. '95, Timpson, Texas 

Hannah Pierson, Ph.B., '97. 

Master of Science. 

Wilson Lewis Kline, B.S., '02, Chicago, 111., 6121 Madison Ave. 
Clarence Anson Neighbors, B.S., '02, M. D. 

Kansas City, Ks., St. Mar. Hos. 

CANDIDATES FOR TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES. 

Nera Margaret Judy, Ida Belle Shive, 

Esther Abby Newcomb, M&ry Elvira Smith, 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



151 



Justina Abby Newcomb, Elizabeth Susan Stanard, 

Beulah Rathbun, Evaline Moore Taylor, 

Laura Belle Rathbun, Claude Francis Thompson. 

Jessie Belle Remington. 

CANDIDATES FOR DIPLOMAS IN THE ACADEMY. 

The Classical Course. 
Henry Clay Dale, Cleo McClannahan, 

Albert Jensen, Walter Franklin Weedman. 

Oscar Earl Liston, 

The Philosophical Course. 

Ruby Violet Gallagher, Ethel Phoebe Kling, 

Ruth Graves, Robert Wynne, 

The Scientific Course. 

Vera Ringer, Spencer Allen Truex 

Glennville Edward Stewart, Carl Isaac Wilkinson. 
Iva Mae Truex, 

THE DIPLOMA IN PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

Helen Harkness. 

THE DIPLOMA IN THE PIANO COURSE OF THE CONSER- 
VATORY OF MUSIC. 

Pearl Chenoweth. 
THE COMMERCIAL COLLEGE. 

The Stenography Course. 

Anna Luellah Able, Ethel May McCollam, 

Regina Mary Brown William Charles McConachie. 

Maude Calvin Irma Blanche McCullough, 
Adelaide Davenport Claypool, Ethel Elizabeth Mayes, 

Elva May Cook Lena Alma Miller, 

Mettie Cornell, Sada Irene Monbeck, 

Maude Crock, Drusilla Adeline Moses, 

Marguerite Ernest, Maude Grubbs, 

Netta Anna Fletcher, Anna Mabel Haigh, 

Morse Garrett John Hargrave, 

Fred William Gottman Fluta Ellen Hiatt 

Lillian Grossman, Gertrude Levina Reed, 

Iva Luoni Holderman, Bert Edward St. John, 

Nellie Johnson, Carrie Tripp, 

Bertha Kirkpatrick, Mildred May Turner, 

Ella Latham, Mary Augusta Veeh. 

Nina Leota Lockwood, 

The Commercial Course. 
Nellie Ward Allen, Chester Alexander Logan, 



152 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Carl Milton Barton, James Edward Long, 

Nettie Cornell, Mack Judson Neyhart. 

Nellie Marguerite Lockwood 

The Telegraphy Course. 

Earle Stewart Kincaid, Georgia Talley. 

PRIZES AWARDED. 

Atkinson Rhetorical Prize Esther Larson 

First Ethics Prize Lloyd C. Smith 

Second Ethics Prize Burl Upham 

First Dobson Oratorical Prize W. E. Monbeck 

Second Dobson Oratorical Prize Claire Estabrook 

First Kinney Essay Prize Augusta Parrish 

Second Kinney Essay Prize Anna G. McCoy 

McWharf Physics Medal Grace Bird 

Wright Physics Prize Clarence N. Beatty 

First Hageman Declamation Prize W. R. McNutt 

Second Hageman Declamation Prize Margaret E. Froning 

McWharf Chemistry Prize Harold Beatty 

Second Chemistry Prize Mattie J. Thomas 

First National Bank Latin Prize Eva Hutchinson 



Becker Latin Prize , 



Emma McCoy 
Earl Pugh 



The First Greek Prize Earl Pugn 

. „ , „ . j . • m < \ Lois Hart, and 

Second Greek Prize, divided j Emma McCoy 

Third Greek Prize J. L. Barker 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 153 
THE INDEX. 



Abbreviations 127 

Absence Rule, The 34 

Academy, The 87 

Classification, Rule for 90 

Electives for the Academy 90 

Entrance Requirement 88 

General Information 88 

Schedule of the Courses 89 

The Courses in Detail 91 

Three Year Courses 88 

Accredited Schools, The List of 53 

Advertising Committee 11 

Alumni Association, The 149 

Annuities 21 

Athletic Association, The 28 

Athletic Rule, The 35 

Auditing Committee, The 11 

Bequests 22 

Bible Study 67 

Board and Rooms 24 

Board of Trustees, The 10 

Buildings 18 

Calendar 8 

Catalog of Students, The 127 

In the Academy 132 

In the College 128 

In the Commercial School 142 

In the Normal School 135 

In the School of Fine Arts 135 

Total attendance 148 

Charter of Ottawa University 16 

Charlton Cottage 24 

Charlton Cottage, Committee of Women, The 11 

Cash Gifts 21 

College of Liberal Arts, The 45 

Admission, Conditional 48 

Admission, Regular 48 

Admission Units in Detail, The 49 

Advanced Standing 48 

Biblical Literature and History 67 

Class Rank, Rule 59 

Degrees, The Baccalaureate 59 

Degree, The Masters 59 

Departments of Instruction 64 

Education 66 

Elective Courses 63 



154 THE ANNUAL CATALOG 

English 69 

Entrance Requirements 46 

Entrance Requirements, The Schedule of 47 

French Language, The 76 

Freshman Declamation 70 

German Language, The 77 

Graduation, Requirement for 59 

Greek Language, The 74 

Group, The Classical 60 

Group, The Philosophical 60 

Group, The Pre-Engineering 62 

Group, The Pre-Medical 63 

Group, The Science 61 

History and Economics 68 

Junior Orations 70 

Latin Language, The 71 

Mathematics 83 

Mechanical Drawing 84 

Mechanical Drawing, Special Tuition for 85 

Philosophy 65 

Sciences, The Biological 81 

Sciences, The Physical 78 

Senior Theses 70 

Sophomore Essays 70 

Special Students 64 

Commercial School, The 119 

Commercial Course, The 123 

Courses, The 120 

Entrance Requirements 120 

Groups of Courses, The 122 

Introductory 120 

Privileges 120 

Stenographic Course, The 124 

Telegraphic Course, The 124 

Tuition and Fees 121 

Committees of the Faculty 14 

Contents, Table of 6 

Christian Education a Worthy Cause 19 

Christian Associations, The 29 

Credentials 26 

Deficiency Rule, The 34 

Degrees Awarded June, 1905 151 

Delinquents, Faculty Reports on 33 

Diploma Fees 37 

Endowment, The 19 

Entrance Examinations 26 

Entrance Requirements 26 

Equipment and Outlook 17 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 155 

Examinations for Advanced Standing 35 

Executive Committee, The 11 

Expenses 24 

Faculty In Its Relations, The 32 

Faculty Regulations 33 

Final Grades, how computed 33 

Financial Secretary, The 22 

Fore-word, A 5 

Forty Years of Service , 17 

General Information 23 

General University Privileges 30 

Government of the School, The 32 

History of Ottawa University 15 

How to Give 21 

Ideal, The School 32 

Joint Committee on Ministerial Students 11 

Laboratories 37 

Lands 17 

Lecture Courses 31 

Library, The 18 

Library, The 31 

Literary Societies 28 

Loan Fund, for Ministerial Students 40 

Loan Fund, The Women's 41 

Location of University 23 

Matriculation and Enrollment 27 

Mid-Semester Grade 33 

Ministerial Association 30 

Ministerial Students, Credentials 40 

Ministers' Children, Tuition 40 

Ministerial Students, Tuition 40 

Musical Organizations, The 28 

Needs of the University 20 

Normal School, The 97 

Bureau of Recommendations 98 

College Credit 98 

General Information 98 

Legal Status, The 98 

Normal Course, The 100 

Privileges 99 

Requirements for Entrance, The 99 

Scope and Aim 98 

Tuition, Fees, and Incidentals 99 

Officers of the Board of Trustees 10 

Officers of the Faculty 13 

Oratorical Association, The 28 

Ottawa Indian School, The 15 

Outlook, The 15 



156 THE ANNUAL CATALOG 

Physical Culture 31 

Prizes Bestowed June, 1905 153 

Prizes Offered 41 

Reading Room 30 

Registrar's Rule, The 36 

Religious Influences, The 30 

Roger Williams University 16 

Rule on Marking System, The 34 

Scholarships, Endowed 38 

Scholarships, Endowment 38 

Scholarship, Pern Willis Fund 39 

Scholarships, Ministerial 39 

Scholarships, University 41 

School of Fine Arts The 103 

Advanced Standing 105 

Art and Applied Design, The Department of 116 

Choral Instruction 113 

Courses Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts 107 

Courses Leading to the Diploma, The 108 

Degrees and Diplomas 104 

Departments of Instruction, The 109 

Diploma Course in Art, The 108 

Diploma Course in Elocution, The 109 

Diploma Course in Music, The 108 

Elocution 117 

Entrance Requirements 105 

General Information 104 

Harmony and Counterpoint 115 

Mandolin and Guitar 114 

Oratory 118 

Orchestra, The College 114 

Piano-Forte, The Department of 110 

Pipe Organ, The Department of the Ill 

Physical Training 117 

Public School Music 113 

Reed and Wind Instrument Courses, The 115 

Sight Singing 113 

Special Privileges 104 

Theory, History, and Literature of Music, The 115 

Tuition and Other Fees 105 

Violin and Other Stringed Instruments 113 

Vocal Music, The Courses in 112 

Schools of the University 44 

School Need, The 19 

Self-Support 25 

Semester Division, The 33 

Special Equipment 18 

Sophomore Prize Essays 42 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 157 

Student Aid 25 

Student Life 27 

Studios and Museums 19 

Teaching Faculties, The 12 

Tuitions, General 37 

Tuition, Less than Pull 37 

Tuitions, Remitted 37 

University Calendar, The 9 

University Labor 4] 

Women's Educational Society, Officers of 11 



OTTAWA UNIVERSITY 



OTTAWA, KANSAS 

The Quarterly Bulletin 

Vol. IV.— April 1907— No. 3 

Entered at Ottawa, Kansas, as second-class matter 

The Forty-Second Annual 
Catalog 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 
1907 



CALENDAR. 



190T 



JANUARY 



JULY. 



s 



M 



9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
28 29 30 31 



14 15 16 17 



10 11 12 13 



1819 



20 



26 27 



10 11 



FEBRUARY 
1 

6 7 8 
12 13 14 15 16 



24 25 26 



18 19 20 21 



28 



09 



23 



25 



AUGUST 
1 

8 



1819 



2(1 



26|2« 



11 12 13 14 15 16 17 



22 
28 29 



2| 3 
9il0 



23 



24 



30 31 



MARCH 



SEPTEMBER 



1011 



17 



12 13 14 15 16 



18 19 



20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



15 16 17 18 19 



22 



29 30 



9 10 11 12 13 



23 



24 



26 



20 21 
27 28 



APRIL 



OCTOBER 



3 4 
9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



13 14 15 16 17 



20 21 22 23 24 25 
27 28 29 30 31 



9 10 11 12 



18 19 
26 



MAY 



NOVEMBER 



12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 . . 



9 10 11 



10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



JUNE 



910 11 



12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 



DECEMBER 
1 2 3 4 5 6 
8 91011121314 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



1908 



JANUARY 



6 

1213 
19 20121 
26 27l28 



8j 91011 
14 15jl6 17 18 
22123 24 
2930 



FEBRUARY 

I 



16 17 

23 24 



1 

8 

10 11 12 13 14 15 
18 19 20 21 22 



26 



27 



28 29 



1| 2 



MARCH 
31 4| 5| 6| 7 
10|lljl2|13jl4 



16 17 18 19 20 21 



2:; 



24 25 



30 31| 



■2l: 



28 



APRIL 



12 13 14115 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 



910 11 



MAY 



10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



JUNE 

6 

9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



Greeting. 

T is the purpose of this catalog to set forth as clearly 
and fully as space will allow matters of vital interest 
to the alumni, friends, patrons and prospective stu- 
dents of Ottawa University. It is altogether probable 
that some subjects upon which information may be de- 
sired have been omitted. If so, a letter addressed to the Presi- 
dent will bring the desired information if it is obtainable. It is 
the intention of the University to embody in its plan of work the 
ideas that have proven from experience the most beneficial in 
securing a broad culture. This involves slight changes from year 
to year. Radical changes are avoided. The University is deter- 
mined to secure the best within its reach ; and in turn to give out 
the best that it can. To this end it invites the hearty co-operation 
of all members of the alumni, the Baptist churches of Kansas 
and adjoining states, the friends, patrons and students of the 
institution. One of the essential elements in building up a col- 
lege is a constituency. Money and equipment alone cannot build 
it up; this can only be done when christian men and women put 
their lives into it. 

We cordially invite correspondence with all young people 
who are looking forward to the time when they can attend some 
college. It will always be a 'pleasure to give them such specific 
information as they may desire, and to co-operate with them in 
securing a broad foundation for an effective life. 




Departments 



OF 



Ottawa University 



I. The College of Liberal Arts 
II. The Academy 

III. The Business College 

IV. The Normal School 

V. The School of Fine Arts 



For information regarding any of these, address 

S. E. PRICE, President, Ottawa, Kansas. 



The University Calendar. 

The school year of Ottawa University is divided into two 
halves or semesters, each of approximately 19 weeks. The Fall 
Semester opens on the first Wednesday after the first Sunday 
of September, and continues till the last week of January. The 
Spring Semester opens on the Tuesday after the close of the Fall 
Semester and closes on Commencement day, which occurs on the 
Wednesday following the first Sunday in June. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 1906-7. 

Jan. 29, Tuesday, The Spring Semester opened. 
Feb, 10, Sunday, The Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
April 4, Mid-Semester reports mailed. 
May 30, Thursday, 1 

May 31, Friday, > Final Examinations. 
June 1, Saturday, ) 

June 1, Saturday, The Inter-Society Debate, 8 p. m. 
June 2, Sunday, The Baccalaureate Sermon, 10:30 a. m. 

The Sermon before the Christian Associations, 
8 p. m. 

June 3, Monday, The Graduating exercises of the Senior Class 
in the Academy, 10 a. m. 

The Dobson and Hageman Prize Contests, 3 p. m, 

Class Day Exercises, 8 p. m. 
June 4, Tuesday, Meeting of the Board of Trustees, 2 p. m. 

Art Exhibits in Art Studio, 4 to 6 p. m. 

Musical Recital^ 8 p. m. 
June 5, Wednesday, Annual Commencement, 10 a. m. 
June 4, Tuesday, Opening of the Summer Session of the Business 

College. 

August 17, Saturday, Close of the Summer Session of the Business 
College. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 1907-8. 

Sept. 3, Tuesday, Entrance Examinations. 
Sept. 4, Wednesday, Fall Semester Opens, 9:30 a. m. 
Sept. 7, Saturday, Reception of the Christian Associations to 
new students in University Hall, 8 to 10 p. m. 
Nov. 13, Wednesday, Mid Semester Reports mailed. 



6 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Nov. 28, Thursday, Thanksgiving, School closed for Thursday, 

Friday and Saturday. 
Dec. 20, Friday, Holiday Vacation begins. 
Jan. 7, Tuesday, School resumes its sessions at 8 a. m. 
Jan. 29, Wednesday, J 

Jan. 30, Thursday, V Final Examinations for Fall Semester. 
Jan. 31, Friday, ) 

Jan. 31, Friday, Fall Semester closes at 4:30 p. m. 
Fefo. 4, Tuesday, Spring Semester opens at 8 a. m. 
Feb. 9, Sunday, The Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
April 9, Mid-Semester Reports mailed. 
June 10, Wednesday, Commencement. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



7 



Section I. — Governing Bodies. 



The Board of Trustees. 

F. H. STANNARD, Ottawa, Term expires June 1907. 

A. DOBSON, Ottawa, Term expires June 1907. 

F. 0. HETRICK ,D. D. S., Ottawa, Term expires June 1907. 

J. M. McWHARF, Ottawa, Term expires June 1907. 

A. F. EBY, Howard, Term expires June 1907. 

REV. J. A. KJELLIN, Fairview, Term expires June 1907. 

REV. W. G. CARY, Cherryvale, Term expires June 1908. 

L. E. CHASE, Hiawatha, Term Expires June 1908. 

REV. J. T. 'CRAWFORD, Parsons, Term expires June 1908. 

D. F. DANIEL, Ottawa, Term expires June 1908. 

W. H. KEITH, Ottawa, Term expires June 1908. 

REV. G. AY. TROUT, Pittsburg, Term expires June 1908. 

JOHN R. BOARDMAN, Ottawa, Term expires June 1909. 
REV. G. W. CASSIDY, Wichita, Term expires June 1909. 
C. Q. CHANDLER, Wichita, Term expires June 1909. 
REV. W. B. HUTCHINSON, D. D., Lawrence, Term Expires 
June 1909. 

A. E. SKINNER, Ottawa, Term expires June 1909. 

J. M. BOOMER, Fairview, Term expires June 1910. 

REV. J. M. BARRATT, North Topeka, Term expires, June 1910. 

M .R. HARRIS, Ottawa, Term expires June 1910. 

DON KINNEY, Newton, Term expires June 1910. 

H. E. SILLIMAN, Winfield, Term expires June 1910. 

A. WILLIS, Ottawa, Term expires June 1910. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

C. Q. CHANDLER, President. 
L. E. CHASE, Vice President. 
JOHN R. BOARDMAN, Secretary. 
M. R. HARRIS, Treasurer. 



8 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



COMMITTEES. 

Executive. 

A. DOBSON, Chairman, F. H. STANNARD, Secretary. 

D. F. DANIEL, JOHN R. BOARDMAN, A. WILLIS, 
W. B. HUTCHINSON, J. V. MITCHELL. 

Finance. 

C. Q. CHANDLER, Chairman, J. M. BOOMER, A. DOBSON, 
DON KINNEY, H. E. SILLIMAN. 

Auditing. 

H. E. SILLIMAN, J. M. McWHARF, F. 0. HETRICK. 

Ministerial Students. 

The PRESIDENT of the University, 
E. K. CHANDLER, 
E. B. MEREDITH, 

W. B. HUTCHINSON, 
W. A. ELLIOTT. 



THE CHARLTON COTTAGE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN. 

MRS. F. H. STANNARD, President, MRS. L. C. STINE, 

MRS. W. E. BEACH, MRS. A. A. RATHBUN, 

MRS. E. K. CHANDLER, MRS. W. A. DAVENPORT, 

MRS. S. E. PRICE, MRS. L. R. CRAWFORD, Sec. and Treas. 



OFFICERS OF THE WOMEN'S EDUCATIONAL SOCIETY. 

MRS. S. E. PRICE President 

MRS. R. S. BLACK, First Vice President 

MRS. L. C. STINE, Second Vice President 

MRS. F. B. PECK, Secretary 

MRS. J. W. BUNN, . Treasurer 

MRS. E. K. CHANDLER, .... Corresponding Secretary 



Chairman of Committees. 

On Securing- Homes MRS. J. C. BEATTY 

On Finance MISS MAGGIE STICKLER 

On Program MRS. E. LISTER 

On Devotional Exercises .... MRS. V. E. LAWRENCE 
On Membership MRS. R. A. WASSON 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



9 



The Faculty. 

SILAS EBER PRICE, A. B. (Rev.) 603 Cedar St. 

President and Professor of Philosophy and Ethics. 

MILAN L. WARD, A. M., D. D. (Rev.) ... 703 Poplar St. 
Emeritus Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES A. YATES, M. S,, .703 Mulberry St. 

Professor of Physical Science. 

RAYMOND A. SCHWEGLER, A. B., (Rev.), . . 727 Cedar St. 
Professor of Greek Literature, Director of the Department 
of Education. 

EDWARD K. CHANDLER, A. M., D. D., (Rev.), 819 S. Main St. 
Professor of History and Economies. 

WILLIAM B. WILSON, B. S., M. S., . . . . 840 Cedar St. 
Professor of Biological Science, Registrar of the University. 

WARREN S. GORDIS, A. B., Ph. D., . . , 1016 Hickory St. 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

MISS CARLOTTA J. CIPRIANI, A. B., Lit. D., 206 East Eighth 
Professor of Modern Languages and Dean of Women 



MURRAY G. HILL, A. B., 726 Cedar St. 

Professor of English Language and Literature. 

JAMES A. G. SHIRK, M. S., 733 Cedar St. 

Professor of Mathematics. 

GRANT H. CRAIN, Master of Accounts, ... 832 Cedar St. 
Principal of the Business College. 

MYRTLE I. HOLLINGS WORTH, 633 Hickory St. 

Instructor in Shorthand. 

FLORENCE E. BEACH, B. Ph., 912 Cedar St. 

Director of the Art School. 

MISS JESSIE K. EDGERTON, Charlton Cottage 



Director of Department of Expression. 



10 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



WILLIAM ROBERT DETWILER, Mus. B., . . 318 S. Main St. 
Dean of the Musical Conservatory, and Professor 
of Vocal Music. 

NELLE M. HARRIS, Mus. B., 406 Willow St. 

Instructor in Piano Forte and Interpretation. 

MRS. EMMA BROCKWAY, 320 S. Main St. 

Instructor in Piano and Organ. 

MRS. CORA DETWILER, Mus. B., . . . . 318 S. Main St. 
Instructor in Piano, Theory and Harmony. 

MARY COLER DAVIS, 508 Poplar St. 

Instructor in Violin. 

GRACE INA BIRD : Assistant in Chemistry 

EVA M. TAYLOR Assistant in Chemistry 

ERNEST BUREAU Assistant in Chemistry 

GLENVILLE E. STEWART Assistant in Physics 

ANNA G. McCOY Assistant in Biology 

AUGUSTA C. PARRISH Assistant in English 

EARL C. PUGH Assistant in Greek 

HUBERT M. RISHEL Assistant in Mathematics 

EDITH CORINNE STEPHENSON Theme Reader 

Other Officers. 

PROF. W. B. WILSON .... Registrar of the University 

PROF. E. K. CHANDLER Librarian 

HATT1E MAUPIN Assistant to the Librarian 

MATTIE THOMAS Assistant to the Librarian 

HATTIE VAN CLEVE Assistant to the Librarian 

ORAH MAY BALYEAT .... Assistant to the Librarian 

JOHN WILSON Curator of the Museum 

PROF. W. S. CORDIS Secretary of the Faculty 

DRUSILLA A. MOSES Secretary to the President 

FRANK LEBOW . . . Director of the University Orchestra 

WILLIAM H .McDONALD . . Director of the University Band 

MISS MARGARET STICKLER . Matron of Charlton Cottage 

F. P. FLETCHER } _ _ ^ .... , _ , 

MARK McCOY i ' ' Caretakers °^ Buildings and Grounds 

PERCY L. WHITEMAN . . . Attendant at the Gymnasium 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



LL 



Committees of the Faculty. 

REGISTRATION Wilson, Schwegler, Cipriani 

BIBLE STUDY Schwegler, Chandler, Shirk 

LIBRARY Chandler, Hill, Gordis 

SCHEDULE Wilson, Schwegler, Cipriani 

PUBLICITY Hill Gordis, Shirk 

ATHLETICS Wilson, Yates (Faculty), J R. Board- 
man (Trustees), J. 0. Evans (Alumni). 
BOARD OF RECOMMENDATIONS . President, Gordis, Wilson 



12 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Section II. — Historical Sketch. 

Ottawa University is the result of missionary effort by Bap- 
tists among the Ottawa Indians. This was begun while they were 
in Canada; it was continued during their migration westward and 
after their settlement upon their reservation in one of the richest 
"portions of Kansas. This work was carried on with enthusiastic 
devotion by Rev. Jotham Meeker and wife. The principal teachers 
among the Indians were Rev. John Tecumseh Jones, an Indian 
graduate of Madison (now Colgate) University, and his wife Jane 
Kelly Jones, a native of Maine. At that time the Ottawas were 
occupying a reservation about twelve miles square in Franklin 
county. They had organized the First Baptist church of Ottawa, 
Kansas. As early as 1860 it had about one hundred members. 

While this missionary and educational work was being carried 
on among the Indians, the white Baptists of Kansas, true to the 
traditions of the denomination which has always been the cham- 
pion of higher education, had chartered the " Roger Williams 
University" and were discussing a location for it. The question 
of location came up at a meeting of the Baptist State Convention 
in Atchison in 1860. Rev. J. T. Jones was present as a delegate 
from the First Baptist Church (Indian) of Ottawa. He suggested 
that the white Baptists join with the Ottawa Indians in establish- 
ing a school on the reservation. The Indians had land that might 
serve as a basis for an endowment and the whites had money and 
teachers. A committee was appointed to confer with the Indians. 
They were found to be favorable and steps were taken to carry 
out the plan. Through the influence of Mr. Jones and this com- 
mittee the matter was brought before Congress and an act was 
passed by which 20,000 acres of the reservation were set apart 
for the use of the institution of learning. The same act named a 
Board of Trustees consisting of four Indians and two whites. The 
first meeting of this Board was held August 20, 1862. It author- 
ized the sale of 5,000 acres at $1.25 per acre in order to establish 
the school. For the next two or three years it appears that the 
school was carried on and attended by quite a number of the 
Indian children. 

In 1865 at the request of the Indians the name "Roger Wil- 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



13 



liams University" was dropped and a new charter secured re-in- 
corporating the school as Ottawa University. This charter was 
issued April 21, 1865, under the seal of William Tulloss, Probate 
Judge uf Franklin County, to I. S. Kalloch, C. C. Hutchinson, John 
G. Pratt, J. T. Jones, James Wind, William Herr, and Henry King. 
These men constituted the first Board of Trustees and carried on 
the institution for a number of years under the dual management 
provided in the act of Congress granting them the land. For a 
variety of reasons this arrangement was not satisfactory to either 
of the races. In the adjustment of interests the Indians agreed 
to withdraw and leave the school entirely in the hands of the 
whites. It was agreed that the 640 acres retained by Ottawa Uni- 
versity should be forever devoted to the purposes of education in 
Ottawa under the auspices of the Baptists of Kansas, that it 
should never be encumbered by mortgage and that the proceeds 
from the sale of any part of it should be used as an endowment. 
With this settlement of equities the history of Ottawa University 
begins. In 1873 the Board of Trustees was increased in number 
from six to tAventy-four. 

The school has passed successfully through all of the struggles 
of a growing college in the great West. Twice it has suffered the 
disaster from fire, but in all of its struggles it has been true to its 
trust. It has been served by some of the noblest men who have 
wrought in the West, Prof. M. L. Ward has given more than 
twenty-five years of most devoted service to it. Such men as Dr. 
P. J. Williams, Rev. Franklin Johnson, D. D., Rev. F. W. Cole- 
grove, D. D., Dr. J. D. S. Riggs and others have each built a 'part 
of his life into the institution. The result is a school recognized 
throughout the state for its thoroughness in the scholastic branches 
and its wholesomeness in the moral and religious influences that 
permeate its students. The progress has been most rapid in 
recent years. The promise for the future is bright. 

There are few schools that can look with greater satisfaction 
upon the young men and women who have gone out from its halls 
than can Ottawa University. They are in all vocations of life and 
reflect credit upon the institution where they were trained. Many 
of them are in the teaching profession, others are occupying some 
of the important pulpits in Kansas and other states, no fewer than 
ten are now or have been in foreign mission work, while a large 
body of them are helping to make the homes of our land. Such 
men as Rev. John Tecumseh Jones who left the residue of his 
estate to the University and those whose names have been already 
mentioned as well as many others have done a work that will be 
a permanent blessing to the world. 

While the institution has been established, maintained and 



14 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



largely supported by Baptists, it is in no sense sectarian. It en- 
courages christian culture and a manly genuine christian life 
founded upon the Bible as the sole and sufficient authority in all 
matters religious. It teaches that a symmetrical character must 
include Christianity. It aims at thoroughness in all of the scholas- 
tic branches. Its equipment is up-to-date and its teachers keep 
up with the times in their subjects. As will be seen in the fol- 
lowing pages it offers a variety of courses sufficient to furnish to 
students a broad culture as a basis for specific preparation for 
any vocation in life. 



The Present Condition. 

ASSETS 

The assets of the University are easily worth a quarter of 
a million dollars. The endowment including all specified funds 
is over $150,000. This is invested in first mortgages on real estate. 
With the exception of the campus of thirty-three acres and a few 
lots, the original grant of 640 acres has been sold. The University 
also holds the title to twenty-five acres situated near Turner, 
Kansas, received from Joanna M. Lovelace of Turner, Kansas, 
as the nucleus of the Merrick K. Barber Memorial Fund. The in- 
come from the sale or use of this land will, when the matter 5s 
finally adjusted, be available for the purposes of ministerial edu- 
cation. 

EQUIPMENT. 

There are four buildings: 

1. — Science Hall, the original college building, is a stone 
structure containing fifteen rooms devoted to lecture, laboratory 
and museum purposes. The building was originally built in 1869, 
burned in 1875 and rebuilt that same year. Since that time it 
has served the various needs of the school with periodic adjust- 
ments. At the present time it contains two laboratories for the 
study of chemistry, two laboratories for the study of biology, 
lecture rooms, offices and the museum. 

2. — Charlton Cottage, a dormitory for twenty-four young wo- 
men. This building was erected as a result of the arduous work 
of Mrs. O. C. Charlton for whom it was named. 

3. — The Gymnasium, was erected some years ago. It has been 
greatly improved in recent years. While it is not all that we de- 
sire splendid use is being made of it. It contains a large exer- 
cise room with basket-ball court, shower baths that were rebuilt 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



1.5 



this past fall, three dressing rooms with new lockers and a room 
for an attendant. 

4.— University Hall is a stone structure three stories in height. 
In size it is seventy-three by one hundred and fifty-two feet in 
outside dimensions with a width of ninety-five feet in the center. 
It contains the offices of the President and Registrar, the chapel 
with nine hundred sittings, a physics laboratory, two society halls, 
thirteen recitation rooms, the library, rest room for young ladies, 
lavatories and coat rooms. The building is thoroughly furnished 
and is the best of its kind in the state. 

The Conservatory has its headquarters in the heart of the 
business section of the city. It is hoped that in the near future 
there will be a building for the Fine Arts Department on the 
campus. 

The Library consists of something over four thousand well 
selected books. The fire of 1902 burned the entire library at that 
time. Every book now on the shelves has been secured since that 
date. Books are being added constantly as funds are in hand to 
purchase them. Though the number of books is not large the 
selections have been made so as to cover every department of 
instruction. In connection with the library is a reading-room in 
which the leading periodicals are to be found so that the students 
may keep in touch with the world movements of today. 

The Laboratories are five in number— tw r o chemical, two bi- 
ological, and one physical. These are well equipped with modern 
apparatus essential for college work. Some very fine pieces 
apparatus have been added during this past year. Additions are 
being constantly made. 

The Museums are two in number. One in Science Hall con- 
taining biological and geological specimens and the other is de- 
voted to classical archeology and is housed in the rooms devoted 
to the study of the classical languages. 

The Art Studio is located in University Hall. It is a well 
lighted corner room and excellent for its purpose. 

During the past year all of the buildings have been fitted for 
gas heating so that all of the dirt and smoke of coal has been 
eliminated. 

THE NEEDS. 

Ottawa University has passed the period of a struggle for 
existence. Its effort now must be to increase its efficiency. A 
splendid beginning has been made, but it is only a beginning. 



16 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG. 



Christian Education is needed in these times because our 
business and social life ought to be permeated by the christian 
spirit and ideals. There is no other institution for higher educa- 
tion that can do this so well as the christian college. Therefore 
christian education is one of the best means for advancing the 
Kingdom of God in the world. 

Endowment is absolutely necessary to accomplish this object. 

The income from tuition fees cannot be expected to cover more 
than about one-third of the cost of a liberal education. Ottawa 
University needs at once $100,000 additional endowment in order 
to meet its annual budgets without deficits. 

More Buildings must be provided in the very near future. A 
modern up-to-date science building large enough to house all of 
the work in science ought to be provided soon. A gymnasium ought 
to take the place of the building that serves that purpose at pres- 
ent. A Fine Arts building for the work of the Conservatory is 
greatly needed in order that we may center the music department 
upon the campus. These will involve a central heating plant of 
sufficient capacity to heat all of the buildings. 

The Library needs more books. We must greatly increase our 
library equipment in the near future. Several thousand dollars 
could be invested to great advantage. There are but few ways 
in which a person can do larger good with their means than by 
purchasing good books and placing them at the disposal of young 
men and women. 

Gifts may be made in one of several ways: 1, Cash. This 
is the safest, surest, most satisfactory way of making contribu- 
tions to any cause. Send your gift to the President of Ottawa 
University, specifying for what purpose you want it applied. 
Many friends of the institution are giving a stipulated amount 
each year for the current expenses; others are paying toward the 
endowment, etc. Every Baptist in Kansas ought to have some 
cash share in the work of the University. 2, Annuities. Another 
method of giving during your lifetime is to transfer to Ottawa 
University such properties as you wish with the provision that 
you have the use of the property so long as you live, or that the 
University pay to you a specific amount so long as you may live. 
Such an arrangement gives to the donor the satisfaction that arises 
from giving, secures to him a regular safe and stated income, and 
assures him of the proper disposition of his property. Several 
gifts have been received in this way. 3, Bequests. What more 
effective memorial can be established than to provide means for 
erecting a building, endowing a department, or in some other way 
aiding in the work of christian education? Many christian men 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



17 



and women who have gained a competency desire to leave some 
such memorial. Even though it may not be a large amount it will 
do good accordingly. Bequests should be made in the following 
terms : 

I give and bequeath to Ottawa University, located at Ottawa, 

Kansas, the following property 

to be used in the following manner, to wit: 

The President of the University will be glad to correspond 
with any persons who have it in their minds to make gifts to the 
University for any specific purpose. There is no kind of invest- 
ment that brings larger returns than that made in young life. 



IS 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Section III. — General Information. 

There are certain general facts that will be of particular 
interest to new students and those contemplating attending college. 

The Location of Ottawa University is ideal for a college. Ot- 
tawa is the county-seat of Franklin county. It has a population 
of about eight thousand. It is known as one of the safest and 
best cities in the state, a city of strong churches and good schools 
where a " joint" cannot exist and young men under twenty-one 
years of age are not allowed in the pool halls without the written 
consent of a parent. There is a Carnegie library that is placed at 
the disposal of citizens and students. Natural gas is used in a 
large number of homes and places of business for heating and 
lighting. There is also an electric light plant. A new water plant 
is being built and will be in use very soon. The city is located 
just fifty-eight miles southwest of Kansas City. 

There are two railroad systems that reach the city. The 
mainline of the Missouri Pacific from St. Louis to Colorado fur- 
nishes easy access to the city from the east and west. The Santa 
Fe system approaches the city from five different directions. The 
University campus of thirty-three acres is located in the south 
part of the city a few minutes' walk from the railway stations. 
At the opening of the Fall Semester representatives of the Chris- 
tian associations will meet the trains and assist the new students 
in every way possible to become located in suitable homes. 

Expense is an important item with every student. A large 
majority of the students room and board with families in the 
vicinity of the University campus. In this way they come under 
the wholesome and restraining influence of Ihbme life. Room ani 
board cost from $2.50 to $5.00 per week. Possibly a fair average 
would be $3.50, though some students by close economy will re- 
duce these expenses to $2.00 per week. A list of approved rooms 
is kept in the University office. The teachers have a close watch- 
care over the homes in which the students live. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



L9 



The range of expenses for a year of thirty-six weeks may be 
indicated by the following table: 





Low. 


Medium. 


High. 




$90.00 


$126.00 


♦ $180.00 




42.00 


42.00 


42.00 




5.00 


7.50 


12.00 


Totals 


, . . .$137.00 


$175.50 


$234.00 



This does not include traveling, clothes, laundry or other gen- 
eral expense. That is about what the student makes it. 



Charlton Cottage is a home for twenty-four young women. 
Board and room here may be had for $3.50 per week. Young 
ladies desiring to engage loom and board in this dormitory are 
invited to correspond with the matron, Miss Maggie Stickler, before 
the opening of the Semester. The rooms in the Cottage are fur- 
nished, but students are required to furnish their own toilet ar- 
ticles and linen. 

Self -Support.— Many students must do something to aid in 
making their way through school. The citizens of Ottawa are very 
thoughtful of the students and employ them whenever possible. 
The christian associations act as employment agencies and secure 
employment for numbers of students. The ladies of the Education 
Society co-operate in securing homes where a limited number of 
young women can work for board and room. Students who expect 
to support themselves in school should come to Ottawa about ten 
days before school opens so as to arrange for work before the 
University opens. The University cannot guarantee work to stu- 
dents, neither does it encourage any but strong students to try to 
earn their way while in school. The health and the regular college 
work must be first. 

Aid. — Students for the ministry who have received the ap- 
proval of the churches of which they are members and also of a 
committee appointed by the Board of Trustees, may expect to re- 
ceive some aid from the income of endowment funds designated 
for that purpose and also from other designated funds. The 
amount of aid may vary from year to year according to the means 
placed at the disposal of the Board. In the past this amount has 
been sufficient to pay the tuition. We do not expect it to be any 
less in the future. There are about twenty endowment scholar- 
ships that are each good for the tuition of one person per year in 
the College, Academy or Business College. 'Some years a 
few of these are placed at the disposal of the President and are 
awarded to worthy students in some of the upper classes. 



20 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



The Women's Educational Society has a fund from which 
loans are made without interest to worthy young women who need 
some help in order to complete their college work. 

Entrance. — Students who have completed the eighth grade in 
the public schools are admitted to the first year in the Academy 
without examination. Admission to any class higher than the 
first year in the Academy may be secured either by examination 
or by certificate. Examinations will be held in University Hall 
on the day previous to the opening of the Fall Semester. The 
certificate consists of a list of the subjects studied and the grades 
earned in schools previously attended. The statement must cover 
these facts: Subject studied, textbook, length of recitation, num- 
ber of weeks, and grade earned. Students presenting certificates 
from High Schools accredited by the University of Kansas will be 
given full credit for all the work that they have done, whether it 
be one year or four years' work. It simplifies the matter of en- 
trance a great deal if these certificates are mailed to the Registrar 
of Ottawa University before the opening of the Semester. All 
students who present grades from unaccredited schools and who 
cannot satisfy the registration committee of the satisfactory qual- 
ity of their work will be required to take the entrance examina- 
tion in the subjects not approved. Candidates who present their 
grades by mail may learn in advance to what extent their grades 
will be approved. The registration committee will make every ef- 
fort to deal in the fairest manner possible with every case. 

Matriculation. — Every student, from whatever school he may 
come or into whatever school of the University he may desire to 
enter must first appear in the office of the President. There he 
must present a letter or certificate of good moral character, signed 
by his pastor or some other responsible person, or in some way 
satisfy the President that he is a proper person to enjoy tha 
privileges of the University. Then he will fill out a "Permanent 
Information Card" and receive a matriculation card signed by th« 
President and sealed with the seal of the University. From the 
President's office he will proceed to the registration committee of 
the school which he wishes to enter. This committee will, upon 
presentation of his matriculation card, issue to him an enrollment 
card bearing the names and numbers of the courses which he is to 
take during the Semester and will issue to him a bill for 
tuition, incidental fees and other University charges involved in 
his courses. The student will next present himself before the 
treasurer and pay his bills, whereupon the treasurer will receipt 
his bill and stamp his registration card. This card thus stamped 
must be presented to every instructor on entrance into the class. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



21 



It is difficult in a brief statement of this sort to meet every 
query that may arise in the mind of the prospective student. The 
University wishes to encourage those who are in doubt to ask 
questions. All correspondence will be promptly answered. Every 
effort will be made to assist in every way possible any young per- 
son who desires to secure an education. 



Student Organizations. 

The student life at Ottawa is simple and democratic. Little 
if any of the friction arising from the clannishness of wealth or 
from social distinctions exists, nor would it be tolerated if any at- 
tempt were made to introduce it. The school is co-educational, 
and the students, both male and female, move on a plane of entire 
parity, with little regard to wealth or social pre-eminence. The 
spirit of Ottawa is whole-souled, temperate, clean and christian. 
The students are given the largest liberty consistent with first class 
work in the formation and conduct of their organizations. These 
organizations differ from year to year in some degree. At the 
present time student life is manifest in these organizations. 

Literary. — The Philalethean and Olympian Literary societies 
engage the students in voluntary literary work. Their membership 
is drawn from all departments of the University. Each society 
has a beautiful hall in which weekly meetings are held. The facul- 
ty sustain only an advisory relation to these societies. 

Christian Associations.— The two christian associations take a 
leading place in shaping the student life. Each association — 
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. — holds a regular devotional meeting 
at four o'clock on 'Sunday afternoons. On the first Sunday of 
each month a union missionary meeting is held. Bible study 
classes are maintained by each association. Mission study classes 
are held by the societies jointly. 

Athletic— The student body is enthusiastically in favor of 
clean athletics. This organization directs the foot-ball, basket- 
ball and baseball teams and the track athletics. The teams have 
given a splendid account of themselves during this present year 
and there is unusual promise for the year to come. For special 
faculty rules governing the public contests of these teams see 
athletic rules. 

Oratorical.— This is a chartered association of some thirty 
members. It provides for a local oratorical contest each year and 



22 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



in connection with like associations in other colleges in Kansas 
provides for a state contest once per year. During the past seven 
years Ottawa University has won one fourth place, four second 
places and two first places in these contests. Mr. W. R. McNutt 
of the class of '08 won first place in the contest of 1907. 

The Prohibition League performs a similar service among 
those who are most vitally interested in the question of prohibition. 

Musical.— The College Orchestra is one of the most prominent 
and unique student organizations. It assists in the daily chapal 
exercises, gives occasional concerts at home and also in neighbor- 
ing cities. 

The College Band has about twenty members. It appears upon 
special occasions such as athletic games and has served to enliven 
and arouse student interest in University events. 

The Men's Glee Club consists of sixteen members and thus 
far has aided greatly in some public religious gatherings. 

The Campus.— This is a periodical issued by the students once 
per month during the school year. The Oratorical Association 
elects the editors and publishers of it. It is a very popular paper 
among the students and alumni. 

Ministerial.— Under the direction of Prof. E. K. Chandler the 
students who have the ministry in view have banded themselves 
together and meet once per week to consider topics that are of 
special interest among themselves. Occasionally some member of 
the faculty or some one from out of the city is invited to address 
this body. It has proven very effective. 

The faculty keep in close touch with all of these organizations 
though the students are given the largest possible liberty. It is 
believed that the proper conduct of such organizations is an es- 
sential element in student life. Every organization is permeated 
by a definite christian spirit. The christian element is kept before 
the students constantly by the daily assemblage of the whole 
student body in the chapel at ten o'clock each morning. Twenty 
minutes is given to this exercise, though on special occasions 
much more time is occupied. The effort in the entire conduct of 
the institution is to emphasize the fact that Christianity is an es- 
sential element in true culture. 



Government of Schools. 

The government of the University aims to secure the highest 
type of self-reliant manhood and womanhood. There are the 
fewest regulations possible consistent with this purpose. There 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



23 



has always existed the most kindly relation between the faculty 
and students. For the purpose of continuing this helpful relation- 
ship the faculty has established the following regulations which 
are subject to change without notice. Students are requested to 
make careful note of them. 

Grades.— A rule to be followed in grading students in the 
various schools of the University: 

"A." shall indicate "excellent work." 
"B" shall be applied to "good work.' 1 

"€" shall be used to indicate "fair" work of approximate- 
ly passing grade. 

"D" shall denote a "conditional failure," which may be 
made up by special examination or otherwise. 

"F" shall indicate "total failure," work to be done again. 

A statement of the grades is sent to the parents or guardians 
at the middle and the close of each Semester. 

Absences.— A rule to govern students in the matter of ab- 
sences from University exercises: 

A. Students may, for good cause, absent themselves from 
one-twentieth of the total number of class exercises in any sub- 
ject for which they are registered, without affecting their stand- 
ing. 

NOTE:— The number of absences thus allowed is as follows: 

5 hour subjects, . . . . . . . • 5 absences 

4 hour subjects, • • . . .... . . 4 absences 

3 hour subjects, . . • • . . . . • • 3 absences 

2 hour subjects. .. .. .. .. 2 absences 

1 hour subjects. .. •• .. .. .. 1 absence 

B. Students who absent themselves from more than one- 
twentieth of the total number of the required exercises of any 
one of their classes, will be marked "F" for each recitation so 
missed, unless the work is made up to the satisfaction of the 
instructor involved. 

C. Any student who during any semester shall absent him- 
self from ten per cent of the exercises of a class in which he 
is registered, and who shall not have been excused by the president, 
shall be suspended from that course, and shall either be required 
to take that course over again, or to arrange for it in some other 
satisfactory manner. 

D. Any student who in any Semester shall be absent from 
more than seven chapel exercises, will, unless excused by the 
officer in charge of the chapel rolls, be required to do extra work 
in the subject in which he ranks lowest, at the rate of one regular 



24 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



lesson or its equivalent for every absence in excess of the number 
allowed; and no final pass grade will be given in the subject in- 
volved until the work so prescribed has been satisfactorily done. 

E. Absences incurred by taking part in athletic contests, at- 
tending religious or other gatherings that have been approved by 
the president shall not be counted in the application of the above 
rules, providing the work involved has been adjusted to the satis- 
faction of the instructor concerned. 

Deficiencies. — Rules applying to students who without satis- 
factory reasons fail in their studies, are as follows: 

A. Any student who in any Semester fails in eight or more 
hours of his work, shall lose his regular class standing, and shall 
be classed as a special student until the work is satisfactorily 
made up. 

B. Any special student who in any Semester, without thor- 
oughly satisfactory reasons shall fail to do creditable worl^ in 
the courses for which he is registered shall be suspended from the 
privileges of the University. 

Advanced Standing.— Any student who either through failure, 
conflict of time schedule, or for other reasons is unable to take 
a required subject with a class, may, if the instructor in the 
subject concerned considers it feasible, be accorded the privi- 
lege of a special examination. If this examination is passed with 
high credit, the student will be accorded a final grade on the 
records of the Unversity. For every such examination taken, 
the candidate must pay to the Registrar a fee of two dollars, 
and no examination will be given except on presentation to the 
examiner of a receipt showing payment of the fee for the proposed 
examination. 

Athletics.— A rule relating to athletic and other contests in 
which students of the University may engage : 

A. No student shall be permitted to take part in any con- 
test as a representative of Ottawa University, who shall not have 
paid, or satisfactorily arranged for, his full tuition for the Semester 
in which the contest takes place. No official or student of the 
University shall be ipermitted to act as surety in such cases. 

B. No student shall be permitted to take part in any public 
contest as a representative of Ottawa University who is not regis- 
tered for twelve or more hours of classroom work each week, and 
who is not maintaining a creditable standing in all the work for 
which he is registered. Creditable standing shall be interpreted to 
mean a class grade of C or more, maintained during the three 
weeks immediately preceding the contest. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



25 



C. The chairman of the Athletic Committee shall in every 
case examine into the qualifications and standing of each can- 
didate not less than forty-eight hours before the contest, and 
if the candidate proves unqualified, he shall be debarred from 
the contest. 

D. The function of the University Athletic Committee shall 
be extended to cover all organizations appearing in public con- 
tests of any kind whatsoever. 

Excess Work.— No college student will be allowed to carry 
more than sixteen hours of recitations per week during the first 
Semester in residence. If during that Semester or any subsequent 
Semester he makes a standing of A in all of his subjects he may, 
during the Semester immediately following, take two hours addi- 
tional in the College or four hours additional in the Academy 
with the consent of the registration committee. 



Expenses. 

Tuition.— The tuition in all the schools of the University ex- 
cept that of the Fine Arts is thirty-six dollars per year, payable 
in two equal installments of eighteen dollars each at the beginning 
of each semester. The tuition charge for students registering for 
three hours or less is five dollars, and the entire incidental fee. 
A student registered for more than three hours will be charged at 
the rate of $1.50 for every hour, but the tuition shall not be more 
than $18.00 per semester. 

Incidental Fees.— A general incidental fee of four dollars 
per year payable in two installments of two dollars each at the 
opening of each semester, a library fee of one dollar per year and 
an athletic fee of one dollar payable at the opening of the Fall 
Semester, is charged each student except those in the school of the 
Fine Arts. The library and athletic fees are charged each student 
as herein provided without reference to the time of year he may 
enter. Students paying the bills for the entire year during the 
first week of the Fall Semester may secure a discount of two 
dollars. 

Laboratory Fees.— In addition to the foregoing charges a fee is 
also charged for materials used in experimentation in certain 
courses. The schedule of charges at the present time is as follows : 

Botany all courses, each $3.00 

Biology I and II, each 3.00 



26 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Chemistry I and IV, each 4.00 

Chemistry II and III each 5.00 

Cytology 5.00 

Histology I and II, each 3.00 

Phonograph rental, per Semester 1.00 

Physics, all courses, each 3.00 

Physiology I and II each 2.00 

Physiology III, 5.00 

Physiography A and B, each 2.00 

Zoology, all courses, each! 3.00 



These fees are subject to change without notice by the Board 
of Trustees, though it is certain that no very marked change will 
be made in the near future. 

In case of withdrawal from the University owing to illness or 
other necessary and unavoidable causes a non-negotiable credit 
slip will be issued to the student for the unconsumed tuition still 
due him. He may use this credit in partial payment of any sub- 
sequent semester's tuition. If unable to re-enter school, the stu- 
dent may make a cash settlement, but in all cases at least one-half 
of the semester's tuition and the entire incidental fee will be 
retained. Laboratory fees cannot be reclaimed after the second 
day of the semester. 

The rates of tuition which hold at present in the various de- 
partments of the School of Fine Arts are stated in connection 
with the outline of the work of that school. 

Diploma Fees.— For every degree conferred by the College cf 
Liberal Arts and by the School of Fine Arts a diploma fee of 
five dollars is collected. The Business College charges a fee 
of one dollar and fifty cents for every diploma issued. 

The fee for a diploma when the Master's degree is conferred 
is five dollars. 



Help. 

Scholarships. — Some of the generous friends of the University 
have provided scholarships for worthy students. In some cases 
this scholarship provides for the tuition, term bills and some small 
amount beside. In other cases it provides for tuition only. There 
is need of a number of such scholarships. One thousand dollars 
placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees will provide for 
tuition and term bills and a little more for one student each year. 

The scholarships now in force are as follows: 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



27 



The Slocomb Scholarship.— By the will of the late H. 0. 
Slocomb, of Chalk Mound, Kansas, the residue of his estate, one 
thousand dollars, forms a perpetual scholarship, the interest of 
which is annually given to a student for the ministry whom the 
faculty may designate. 

The Fern Willis Scholarship Fund. — In memory of his daugh- 
ter Fern, Mr. A. Willis, for many years a member of the Board 
of Trustees of Ottawa University, has deposited with the treasurer 
of the University the sum of One Thousand dollars, to form a 
trust fund. The income from this fund shall be used each year 
to assist in defraying the expenses of a young woman of moderate 
or humble circumstances who shall be a graduate of the Ottawa 
High School. The choice of such a person will be made by a com- 
mittee composed of the Board of Education of the City of Ottawa, 
the Superintendent of the schools of Ottawa, and the Pastor of 
the First Baptist church of Ottawa. Preference will be shown to 
a young woman whose class standing is high, and who is a member 
of the Baptist church. If the beneficiary of this scholarship 
proves worthy, the benefits will be extended throughout her entire 
college course. 

Endowment Scholarships. — There are about twenty scholar- 
ships that were sold a few years ago to increase the endowment 
funds of the University. These are good for tuition only in any 
of the schools except the School of Fine Arts. Some of these are 
placed at the disposal of the faculty each year. We cordially in- 
vite the holders of these scholarships to allow the president or 
faculty to award them to worthy students. At the present time 
the following endowment scholarships are in force: 

1. The eta via Reed Scholarship established by Mrs. Oc- 
tavia Reed, of Louisburg. 

2. The Harriet Chase Scholarship by Mr. J. S. Tyler, of 
Fairview. 

3. The James M. Chase Scholarship by Mr. L. E. Chase, of 
Padonia. 

4. The Luceba M. and William F. Holroyd Scholarship by 
Mr. W. F. and Miss L. M. Holroyd, of Cedarvale. 

5. The John Nelson Scholarship by Mr. John Nelson, of 
Ottawa. 

6. The Abigail Bevington Scholarship by Mrs. Abigail Bev- 
ington, of Iola. 

7. The Simeon Cole Scholarship by Mr. Simeon Cole, of Mc- 
Louth. 



2S 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



8. The Peter and Matilda Bolinger Scholarship by Rev. Peter 

Bolinger, of Bogue. 

9. The Oscar J. and Alice A. Holroyd Scholarship by Mr. 
0. J. Holroyd, of Hewins. 

10. The Pearl B. Kellogg- Scholarship by D. D. Kellogg, uf 
Kellogg, Kansas. 

11. The Robert W. and Margaret A. Black Scholarship by 
Mr. R, W. Black, of Elgin. 

12. The Augustus S. Thompson Scholarship by Mr. A. S. 
Thompson, of Cherryvale. 

13. The Harry W. and Jennie M. Grass Scholarship by Mr. 
H. W. Grass, of LaCrosse. 

14. The Henry H. and Hattie E. Twining Scholarship by 
Mr. H. H. Twining, of Homestead. 

15. The Cordelia Russell Scholarship by Mrs. Cordelia Rus- 
sell, of Derby. 

16. The William W. and Louisa D. Loveless Scholarship by 
Mr. W. W. Loveless, of Marion. 

17. The Theodore F. and Cynthia E. Bradbury Scholarship 
by Mr. T. F. Bradbury, of McPherson. 

18. The James P. and Sallie D. Hall Scholarship by Mr. J. 
P. Hall, of Medicine Lodge. 

19. The Stephen L. and Alice Umberger Scholarship by Mr. 
S. L. Umberger, of Larned. 

20. The William H. and Lois N. Parish Scholarship by Mr. 
W. H. Parish, of Leoti. 

21. The Abraham C. and Eliza F. Miles Scholarship by Mr. 
A. C. Miles, of Conway Springs. 

22. The C. L. and C. G. Kinney Scholarship by C. L. and 
C. G. Kinney, of Newton. 



UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Ottawa University in common with the other Christian col- 
leges of Kansas, offers each year as a reward for superior ac- 
complishments, a scholarship granting free tuition for one year 
in the Academy, College, or Normal School, to that student in the 
graduating class of any grade school, high school or academy in 
Kansas, or the contiguous territory, who shall rank highest in his 
dass, and who desires to continue his education. Blanks for this 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



29 



purpose may be secured from the principal or teacher of the local 
school; or if a blank has not been deposited, a copy will be sent 
on receipt of the name of the principal or superintendent in 
charge of the school involved. 

Ministerial Scholarships. — There are certain endowment funds 
the income from which must be used to aid students for the min- 
istry. Through the Educational Commission of the Kansas Bap- 
tist Convention offerings have been received from the churches 
for Christian and Ministerial education. These Ih'ave been suffi- 
cient to provide for the tuition of ministerial students. It is 
hoped that through the gifts of men and women who believe in an 
educated ministry these funds may be largely increased in the 
near future. 

Women's Loan Fund. — Some of the women of the state who 
are especially interested in the higher education of young women 
have provided a small loan fund which is loaned without interest 
to worthy young women. While the Women's Educational Society 
that has charge of this fund is in a sense a local organization, its 
contributors extend throughout the whole state. Any woman may 
join the organization by paying one dollar annually. 

PRIZES. 

A number of prizes are offered from year to year for ex- 
cellence in specific lines of work. The prizes offered for the cur- 
rent year are as follows: 

The Dobson Prizes, amounting to ten and five dollars re- 
spectively, the gift of Mr. A. Dobson, of Ottawa, are awarded to 
the two members of the Junior Class who excel in the prepar- 
ation and delivery of original orations. The contest is held dur- 
ing commencement week. 

The contestants must be chosen, by a preliminary contest if 
necessary, not later than April 15th. Each oration must be ap- 
proved by the department of English at least four weeks before 
first presentation in contest. 

The Kinney Prizes, the first of ten and a second of five dol- 
lars, are given by Mr. Don Kinney, of Newton, Kansas, to the 
two members of the Sophomore Class who write the best and 
the second best essay upon one of several subjects assigned by 
the faculty. Each essay must contain from 1,800 to 3,000 words, 
and three copies of it must be handed to the head of the depart- 
ment of English on the fifteenth of March. Participation ia 
this contest is not compulsory, but each Sophomore who partici- 



30 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



pates in the contest, and who attains a rank of not less than B, 
is excused from the preparation of two of the required essays. 

The class of 1909 selected from the following subjects: 

1. "The Psychology of Commerce. ' ' 

2. "The Pharisees and Saducees: Their real meaning in 
Jewish History. " 

3. "The Congo Free State. " 

4. "Walter Scott, The Father of the Historical Novel." 

5. "Greek Influence in Roman Education." 

6. "The French Influence on the Life and Language of Eng- 
land after the Norman Conquest." 

7. "Beneficial Bacteria." 

8. "Euclid: His Effect on Modern Mathematics." 

The class of 1910 will next year select from the /following 
subjects : 

1. "The Development of English Drama up to the Time of 
Shakspere. ' ' 

2 ' ' The Use of Concrete by Roman Architects and Engineers, 
in View of Recent Developments in Concrete Construction." 

3. "A Comparison of the Position of Woman in the Homeric 
Age and under the Athenian Democracy." 

4. "The Rise of Prophecy and Prophetism." 

5. "A Century's Development of Chemistry." 

6. "The Reformation in England." 

7. "Influence of the Hindoos and Arabs on Mathematics." 

8. ' ' Development of Secondary Schools in America. ' ' 

The Freshman Latin Prizes.— The First National Bank of 
Ottawa gives a first prize of ten dollars, and Mr. C. L. Becker, a 
citizen of Ottawa, a second prize, consisting of the Latin text 
books used in the Sophomore Class of the following year, to the 
Freshmen who rank respectively first and second in the Latin 
work of the year. 

The McWharf Chemistry and Physics Prize Medals— Dr. J. 
M. McWharf, as a memorial to his son Raymond, offers a gold 
medal to that student of the Freshman Class whose standing in 
Chemistry for the year is highest, and another to that member of 
the Sophomore Class who attains the highest grade in Physics. 
These prizes are awarded on Commencement Day. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



The Atkinson Rhetorical Prize. — At the Commencement of 
1903, it was announced that Mrs. Margaret Atkinson, a warm 
friend and supporter of the University throughout its history, 
would give, beginning with 1904, a prize of twenty-five dollars to 
that member of the graduating class each year, who has made the 
best grades in rhetorical work during the four years of the college 
course. Soon after making this offer, Mrs. Atkinson was called 
to her eternal reward, but her son, Mr. James Northrup Atkinson, 
(A. B., 1898, B. S., 1900, A. M., 1903), appreciating the spirit 
which prompted the offer mentioned, and anxious to carry out the 
wishes of his mother, generously volunteered to continue the prize 
as a memorial, and began to award the prize in 1904. 

The Hageman Prizes, amounting also to ten and five dollars, 
are awarded to the two members of the Freshman Class who excel 
in declamations. They are the gift of Mrs. T. J. Hageman, of 
Clifton, Kansas, and her son, Rev. S. S. Hageman, '93. 



32 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Section IV. — Schools of the 
University. 

We present herewith a complete statement of the courses, 
entrance requirements, equipment, degrees and diplomas of each 
of the five schools as they are at the present time being carried 
on. The University reserves, however, at all times the right for 
good reason to change, either by increase or decrease, any of the 
facilities outlined. All changes made, however, will in so far as 
it is at all possible, be in the direction of better service to our 
constituency. Every effort will be made to keep up with the best 
educational ideals in every department. 

The College of Liberal Arts. 

There are five prescribed courses of study offered, each four 
years in length, each leading to a baccalaureate degree. These 
degrees are Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of 
Philosophy. In each of these courses there is a certain amount 
of work required and a certain amount elective. A total of one 
hundred and twenty-six semester hours of approved work must be 
taken in order to complete any one of these courses. These 
courses are arranged so that during the first two years the student 
may gain a general acquaintance with the various fields of know- 
ledge. Daring the second two years he may gain a more inten- 
sive acquaintance with some one field. To accomplish this pur- 
pose the work during the Freshman and Sophomore years is most- 
ly required, during the Junior and Senior years it is largely 
elective. 

Two of the courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science are preparatory to professional courses in engineering and 
medicine. Of necessity almost all of the work in these courses 
is prescribed because it pertains distinctly to the professions in 
view. 

These courses are formed after very careful thought and 
study on the part of persons who have made this particular work 
a life study. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



;:3 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

In harmony with the other accredited colleges in Kansas 
Ottawa University requires fifteen units for unconditional admis- 
sion to the College of Liberal Arts. Students presenting twelve 
units will be entered conditionally with the understanding that 
the three units lacking will be made up during the first year. It 
is required that the fifteen units must be selected from the schedule 
herewith presented. (A unit as here used is a subject pursued 
for thirty-five weeks in an accredited High School or Academy 
with recitation periods aggregating each week not less than two 
hundred minutes.) 



THE SCHEDULE OF ADMITTED UNITS. 



GROUP I. 
English. 



GROUP II.. 
Foreign 
languages. 



GROUP III. 
History. 



English, four units. 



GROUP IV... 
Mathematics. 



GROUP V. 
Physical 
Science. 



Latin, four units. 
Greek, three units. 
German, three units. 
French, three units. 

f Greek and Roman, one unit. 
| Mediaeval and Modern, one unit. 
^ English, one unit. 

American, one unit. 

Economics, one unit. 

Elementary algebra, one and one- 
half units. 
Plane geometry, one unit. 
Solid geometry, one-half unit. 
Plane trigonometry, one-half unit. 
Advanced algebra, one-half unit. 



Physical geography, one unit. 
Physics, one unit. 
Chemistry, one unit. 



GROUP VI. 
Biological 
Science. 



Botany, one unit. 
Zoology, one unit. 



ADMISSION.— Students completing the course of study in 
the Academy of Ottawa University are admitted upon (presentation 
of their diploma. Students from accredited high schools or acade- 
mies are required to present a certificate signed by the head of the 



34 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



school stating- in detail the amount of work done. Blank certifi- 
cates for this purpose can be had by addressing the president. 

Students coming from schools not fully accredited are advised 
to bring a complete statement of all the work that they have done 
including text books used, length of time spent on each subject, 
note books, etc. Each such case will be settled upon its own merits. 
Examinations will be required only in cases where it is not clear 
that the work has been up to the standard. In no case ex- 
cept the Academy of Ottawa University will it be sufficient *o 
present a diploma. Credits given upon certificate are conditional 
and may be withdrawn if the work of the student shows his 'prep- 
aration to have been superficial. 

The requirements for admission to the courses leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy are as 
follows : 

Latin 4 units Biological Science 1 unit 

English 3 units History 1 unit 

Mathematics 2^2 units Physical Science 1 unit 



The requirements for admission to the Scientific course are 
as follows: 

Latin 3 units History 1 unit 

English 3 units Physical Science 1 unit 

Mathematics 2 1 /2 units Biological Science 1 unit 



The requirements for admission to the Pre-medical course are 
as follows: 

English 2 units Mathematics 2 units 

Foreign Language, 2 units, one of which must be Latin. 

Physical Sciences 1 unit Biological Science 1 unit 

History 1 unit. 



The requirements for admission to the Pre-Engineering course 
are as follows: 

Mathematics 3 units English 3 units 

Physics 1 unit 

Foreign Language— may be French or German or Latin, 
3 units of one or 2 units of any one, and one of any other— 3 units. 
Free-hand drawing, 1 unit. Optional. 
Manual training, 1 unit. Optional. 

In all of these courses the remainder of the fifteen units 
must be elected from the schedule of admitted units given on 
page 33. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



35 



THE ADMISSION UNITS IN DETAIL. 
I ENGLISH. Three Units. 

1. — Each candidate for degrees will be required to write a 
paragraph or two on each of the several topics chosen by hirn 
from a considerable number set before him on the examination 
paper. \ 

The topics will be drawn from the following works: 
1907. Shakspere's The Merchant of Venice, and Macbeth; 
The Sir Roger de Coverly Papers in The Spectator; Irving 's Life 
of Goldsmith; Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe 
and The Lady of the Lake; Tennyson's Gareth and Lynette; 
Lancelot and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur; Lowell's The 
Vision of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas Marner. 

The candidate is expected to read intelligently all the books 
prescribed. He should read th.m as he reads other books; he 
is exp'ected, not to know them minutely, but to have freshly in 
mind their most important parts. In every case, knowledge of 
the book will be regarded as less important than ability to write 
clear and idiomatic English. 

2. — A certain number of books are prescribed for careful 
study. This part of the examination will be upon subject mat- 
ter, literary form, and logical structure, and will also test the 
candidate's ability to express his knowledge with clearness and 
accuracy. 

The books prescribed for this part of the examination are : 
1907. Shakspere's Julius Caesar; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, 
L 'Allegro, and II Penseroso; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with 
America; Macaulay's Essay on Addison and Life of Jackson. 

3. — The candidate will be expected to be able to write Eng- 
lish that is not notably defective in point of spelling, punctuation, 
idiom, or division into paragraphs; t© answer questions in English 
Grammar, and to be somewhat familiar with the lives and works 
of the prominent writers in English literature. 

II. HISTORY. 

1. — Ancient History; One unit. Oriental, Greek and Roman 
history. The student will be expected to show a satisfactory 
grasp of the main facts in the various important elements in 
pre-Christian history. The course must represent one full year 
of study. 

2. — Mediaeval and Modern History; One unit. The leading 
events of the period from 250 A. D. to the present day. One full 
year of time should be spent on the subject, as outlined in the 
State High School Manual. 



36 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



3. — American History; One unit. A standard high school 
course of one year, based on a text and accompanied by parallel 
reading will be expected if this unit is presented for entrance. 

4. — English History; One unit. Reasonable familiarity with 
the growth and development of England, and of the causes which 
have led to her greatness. A full year's course in an accepted 
high school will be expected if this unit is presented for entrance. 

III. LATIN. Three or Four Units. 

Either three or four of the units described below may be of- 
fered for entrance. If three units are offered, it is preferrd that 
they be 1, 2, and 3. Students intending to pursue the study of 
Latin after entering college will find it more satisfactory to com- 
plete the four entrance units in the preparatory school, in case 
there is opportunity to do so. Candidates for the degrees of A. 
B. or Ph. B. will be required to have made up or to be making up 
the fourth entrance unit before taking any of the more advanced 
Latin courses. Candidates' certificates should indicate specifically 
the amount and character of their work in Latin composition. 
Those offering less than the equivalent of one recitation period 
per week of composition for each unit offered will be examined in 
the subject, and if found deficient will be required to do supple- 
mentary work in Latin composition for which no college credit 
will be given. 

1. — The Elements of Latin : Mastery of declension and con- 
jugation; accurate and ready pronunciation; familiarity with the 
more usual verb and noun constructions; a vocabulary of at least 
four hundred words of those most frequently used by Caesar; 
practice in translating and reading simple connected Latin. 

2. — Caesar and Latin Composition. The first four books of 
Caesar's Gallic War, or selections of equal extent from the seven 
books. In place of one book of Caesar an equivalent amount of 
Nepos or Viri Romae will be accepted. The student should be 
able to write simple Latin sentences involving the words and 
constructions habitually employed by Caesar. 

3. — Cicero's Orations and Latin Composition. The orations 
may be those usually read, the four against Catiline, the one for 
the Manilian Law, and the one for the poet Archias. In place of 
the last mentioned, Sallust's Catiline or an equivalent amount of 
Cicero's Letters will be accepted. In comparison with the impo- 
sition of the previous year somewhat more complex sentences, us- 
ing a greater variety particularly of verb constructions, should be 
written. 

4. — Vergil's Aeneid and Latin Composition. Books I- VI of 
the Aeneid; practice in the rhythmical and intelligent reading of 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



37 



the text; an understanding- of the mythological and legendary- 
references and the rhetorical and linguistic characteristics of the 
poem; appropriate diction in translation. The Latin composition 
during this year may well be in connection with a systematic 
review of syntax. 

IV. GREEK. 

A unit offered in Greek should cover the following ground: 

1. — Mastery of the entire inflectional system, with an ability 
to analyze at sight any regular verb form. 

2. — Familiarity with the regular constructions of Attic prose 
with special reference to conditional and purpose clauses. Good- 
win's Greek Grammar is preferred. 

3. — One book of Xenophon's Anabasis. 

4. — Ability to translate into Greek passages of moderate dif- 
ficulty. 

A proper amount of College credit will be given for Greek 
offered for an admission credit though credit cannot be given both 
for admission and in College. Provision is made for beginning 
Greek in the Freshman year. 

V. GERMAN. 

A unit of German involves careful mastery of the declensional 
and conjugational machinery, accurate pronunciation, ability to 
understand simple German conversation and to write simple Ger- 
man compositions. In addition to this the student should read 
not less than 150 pages of simple text, though more stress will 
be laid on the mastery of the language than on the mechanical 
reading of a given amount of text. 

VI.— THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES. 

1. — Physiography; One unit. The course should include a gen- 
eral description of the earth, and of the conventional methods of 
representing its surface; a study of the oceans, of the lands, and 
of the atmosphere, together with the laws which govern the 
changes which are taking place at the present time. It is recom- 
mended that field work be combined with the study of some stand- 
ard text. 

2. — Physics. One unit. The work in Physics should include 
the careful study of a text such as Carhart and Chute's High 
School Physics, and a series of laboratory experiments conducted 
under the supervision of the teacher. At least thirty-five experi- 
ments should be selected from some standard series, and be re- 
ported in a laboratory note book. 



38 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



3. — Chemistry. One unit. The unit of Chemistry, if present- 
ed, must include all of the subjects included in course I in Chemis- 
try of Ottawa University. 

VII. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE. 

The entrance unit in biological science may be either Botany 
or Zoology. In either case the work will be expected to cover 
one full year of stud}-, with ample laboratory and field woik to sup- 
plement the text book and class discussions. Students taking en- 
trance examinations in these or the physical sciences, will be re- 
quired to present note books covering the laboratory work done, 
in order to secure credit. Students who did not do laboratory work 
will be required to make it up before they receive full entrance 
credit. 

VIII. MATHEMATICS. 

1. — Algebra. One and one-half units required. The work 
should cover the following subjects as given in the better high 
school text-books; addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, 
factoring, highest common factor, lowest common multiple, frac- 
tions, equations of the first degree, involution, evolution, theory 
of exponents, radicals, and quadratic equations. 

The work requires daily recitations for one and a half school 
years. 

2. — Plane Geometry. One unit required. The work should 
cover figures formed by straight lines, the circle, similar figures, 
areas, polygons, symmetry, with problems of construction and orig- 
inal exercises. A daily recitation for an entire school year should 
be devoted to this work. 

3. — Solid Geometry. One-half unit, optional for entrance. 
Special attention should be given to the geometry of the sphere. 
The subject requires a daily recitation for one-half school year. 
Students who do not present Solid Geometry as one of their en- 
trance subjects, will be required to take it in connection with 
their Freshman work. 

ACCREDITED SCHOOLS. 

The courses of the following schools have been examined by 
the state examiner, and found either wholly or partly adequate for 
entrance to the College of Liberal Arts, and to the School of Fine 
Arts of Ottawa University. 

All students who present properly executed certificates from 
the schools in the list below will receive full credit for all work so 
certified. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



39 



Candidates from schools not included in any of the lists be- 
low, are invited to submit a careful statement of the work which 
they have done, giving as many of the facts pertaining to the 
work as may be accessible. Full credit will be given for all work 
which appears satisfactory, and examination required only on 
subjects which have not been done in a thoroughly satisfactory 
manner. 

Class 1. 

Schools in this list are fully accredited and are working under the 
most favorable conditions. 

Name of School. Superintendent. Principal. 

Abilene .•• •iW. A. Stacey, B. S Chas. H. Brooks 

Academy of Idaho, 

Pocatella John W. Faris 

Albuquerque, N. Mex..J. E. Clark, M. Pd J. A. Miller, B. Pd. 

Anthony J. H. Clement, A. B Adeline M. Finn, A.B. 

Argentine H. P. Butcher, A. B. . .Minnie J. 01iverson,A.B„ 

Aikansas City L. W. Mayberry, A. B... John F. Bender, A.B. 

Atchison N. T. Veatch A. H. Speer, A. B. 

Atchison Co. Effingham John W.Wilson, A. B. 

Bartlesville, Oklahoma. . Lynn Glover Lynn Glover. 

Beaverhead Co., Dillon, 

Montana L. R. Foote, B. L. 

Beloit J. 0. Hall, A. B T. P. Downs. 

Burlingame C.A.Deardorff M. E Grace Brigham. M. A. 

Chanute Jas. H. Adams H. P. Shepherd, A. B. 

Chase Co., Cottonwood 

Falls B. F. Martin 

Cherokee Co. Columbus C. S. Bowman. 

Clay Co., Clay Center S. A. Bardwell. 

Coffey ville W. M. Sinclair H. S. Dwelle 

Concordia A. F. Senter, B. S Ray Green, B. S. 

Council Grove A. M. Thoroman 

Crawford Co., Cherokee W. S. Pate. 

Decatur Co., Oberlin W. G. Riste. 

Dickinson Co., Chapman., J. P. Perrill, B. P. 

El Dorado Warren Baker C. F. Smith, B. S 

Ellsworth Homer S.Myers, A.M.. .Lewis H Beall, A.B. 

El Reno F. N. Howell, A. B E.A. Robinson, A. B. 

Emporia L. A. Lowther, A. M. ..C. H. Lyon. 

Eureka B. E. Lewis, A. M W. A. Bailey, A. B. 

*Fort Scott D. M. Bowen, A. B.....J. B. Stokesberry, A.B. 

Galena Leslie T. Huffman D. H. Holt. 

Garnett €. H. Oman Geo. H. Marshall. 



40 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Name of School. Superintendent Principal. 

Great Bend C. A. Strong W. L. Bowersox. 

Halstead C. 0. Smith 0. E. MeCroskey, A.B. 

Harper E. E. Sluss, B. S Margaret W. Dean. 

Herington A. J. McAllister, B. S..Lou Kinne, A. B. 

Hiawatha Geo. G. Pinney, A.B A. C. Andrews, A. B. 

Holton E. L. Holton, A. B. . . .W. H. Caruthers, A. B. 

Hot Springs, Ark Geo. B. Cook F. C. Nolen, A. B. 

Humboldt" J. E. Cook A. I. Decker. 

•Hutchinson R. R. Price, A. M Chas. A. Wagner, A.B. 

Iola Clifford A. Mitchell. .. .L. H. Wishard. 

Joplin, Mo., L. J. Hall S. A. Baker, B. Pd. 

♦Junction City W. S. Heusner, A. M...R. F. Mills, A. B. 

Kansas City, Kans.....M. E. Pearson, B. D J. M. Winslow, A. M. 

Labette Co., Altamont W. M. Kyser, A. B. 

La Junta, Colorado George L. Hess, Ph.B...Chas. E. Griffin, B. S. 

•Lawrence F. P. Smith, A. M F. H. Olney, A. B. 

•Leavenworth G. W. Kendrick Belle Whitrock. 

I ewis Acad., Wichita R. S. Lawrence, Ph.D... J. M. Naylor, Ph.D. 

Loretto Academy, 

Kansas City, Mo., Sister Louise Wise. 

Lyons T. A. Edgerton Louis Ringwalt. 

Mankato F. W. Simmons, M. S... Myrtle Pider, A. B. 

Manual Training, 

Kansas City, Mo., .J. M. Greenwood,Ph.D. .E. D. Phillips, Ph.M. 

Marion H. H. Van Fleet, A.B.. Clara Morris. 

Marysville C. B. Myers, A. B E. L. Heilman. 

McPherson Chas. W. Kline, A.B.. .Clinton Wright. 

".Minneapolis D. 0. Smith, B. S Ethel MeCaughey, A.B. 

Montgomery Co., 

Independence S. M. Nees, B. S. 

Newton ; D. F. Shirk, A. B 0. J. Silverwood, A. B. 

Norton Co., Norton H. H. Gerardy. 

Olathe R. L. Parker, A. M....W. H. Eisenman, A. B. 

Ottawa A. L. Bell, A. M W. D. Buchholtz, B. L. 

Paola. F. K. Ferguson, B. S...C. H. Hep worth, Ph. B. 

Parsons J. A. Higdon, A. B Louise M. Schaub. 

Peabody W. D. Ross, A. M Daisy Spilman, A. B. 

Pittsburg AH. Bushey R. E. Hartsock, B. S. 

Plainville C. E. Rarick, A. B Lulu A. Roach, A. B. 

Pratt W. Falkenrich, A. B... Irene Crawford. A. B. 

Prosso, K. C, Mo J. P. Richardson, A. B. 

Rosedale Geo. E. Rose, B. D Anna D. White, A. B. 

Salina G. R. Crissman, A. B..John Lofty, A. B. 

Sedgwick Robt. N. Halbert,Ph.B..E. €. Stinson. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



41 



Name of School. Superintendent. Principal. 

Seneca R. G. Mueller, A. B.... Pearl McCurdy, Ph.B. 

Sheridan Co., Hoxie Prin. Jent. 

Smith Center T. H. Hooper, A. B A. McKechnie. 

Southern Kans. 

Acad, Eureka James F. Eaton, A. M. 

♦Sumner Co. /Wellington W. C. McCroskey, A. B. 

Sterling Geo. L. Seeley, A. B.. .Jeanette M. Inches, Ph.B 

St. Joseph, Mo., J. A. Whiteford R. H. Jordan, A. B. 

Thomas Co., Colby W. E. Ray, A. M. 

♦Topeka L. D. Whittemore, A.M.H. L. Miller, A. B. 

Trego County, Wakeeney J. H. Niesley. 

Univ. Mil. Acad. Columbia, Mo John G. Welch, A. M. 

Univ. Prep. School , 

Kansas City, Mo., Eugene E. Sallee, A. B. 

Urbana University Acad., Urbana, 111 Russell Eaton, A. B. 

Warrensburg, Mo., N. G. Morrow, Pd. M... Ed ward Beatty, Bd. B. 

Washington W. D. Vincent, A. B...Paul S. Kanty, A. B. 

Wentworth Mil. Acad., 

Lexington, Mo., W M. Hoge, A. M R. N. Cook, A. B. 

Western Mil. Acad., 

Upper Alton, 111, Albert M. Jackson A.M. 

♦Wichita R. F. Knight, A. B E. H. Ellsworth, A. M. 

Winfield J. W. Spindler, A. M... Blaine F. Moore, A. M. 

* Schools accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 



Class 2. 

Schools named in this list are fully accredited, but fall short of the 
most favorable conditions in some respects. (It may be a shortage in 
laboratory equipment, short school term, or perhaps the teachers are re- 
quired to carry too many recitations.) 

Belleville E. E. Haney Dorothy Doyle. 

Burlington Inez Chapman, A. B Myrtle Collins. 

Caldwell D. C. Porter, A. B Mary Vasey. 

Cherryvale A. J. Lovett, A. M. . . .E. L. Thompson. 

Clyde C. M. Ware Emma M. Palmer, A.B. 

Ellis B. E. Ford, B. S Minnie Wendel. 

Frankfort M. G. Kirkpatrick Harriet Landers. 

Garden City E. F. Ewing, A. B May Cathcart. 

Gas City H. D. Ramsey Alice Rose, A. B. 

Gove Co., Gove F. E. Dindley. 

Horton W. W. Wood, A. B W. M. Blair, A. B. 

Howard Harley I. French H. D. Paynter. 



42 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Name of School. Superintendent. Principal. 

La Harpe A. J. Baker Florence Mitchell, M.A. 

Larned W. S. Robb, B. S Mary E. Smith, Ph. B 

Lyndon John H. Linn John H. Linn. 

Neodesha J. M. Steffen H. J. Davis. 

Osage City E. C. Hackney C. D. Jennings. 

Osborne R. K. Farrar, B. S Emma Schaich, B. A. 

Osawatomie C. L. Williams Floyd, B. Lee. 

Russell N. U. Spangler S. J. Butts, A. M. 

Sabetha Geo. T. Beach, A. M....Mary Roseberry, A. B. 

Stockton Geo. B. Burkholder, B.P.Ethel Smith, A. M. 

Wamego J. P. McCoy Grace C. Eaten, B. A. 

Ystes Center I. C. Gregory, A. B E. Grace Melton. 



Class 3. 

The schools named in this list fall short of full preparation by not 
more than three units. 

Alma F. M. Patterson, B.S.D. L. B. Burt. 

Attica S. B. Mordy, M. A Harry Mudge. 

Axtell R. E. Long 

Augusta J- H. Gibson Vivian Roberts, A. B. 

Belle Plaine C. H. Landrum, A. M...Lita Battey, A. B. 

Blue Mound A. S. Hiatt, A. B M. Ellen Dingus, B. S. 

Bonner Springs Joseph Stottler, M. S...Vergie Williams. 

Bronson C. M. Smith Mrs. C. M. Smith. 

Blue Rapids A. J. Clark, A. B H. J. Garnett. 

Burrton D- E. Conner Ida B. Shive, A. B. 

Cawker City A. P. Gregory, B. S. .A. P. Gregory, B. S, 

Centralia A. U. Jarrett Mary White, A. B. 

Clifton G. B. Buikstra, A. B W. A. Cain. 

Colony John B. White John B. White. 

Delphos M. C. Shaible, B. S. ...Belle Lunden/B. Ped. 

Dixon Twp. Argonia Will Poundstone, Josephine Bell, A. B. 

Dodge City R. M. Killian, A. B Howell P. Lair, A. B. 

Douglass R- A. Felton, Ph. B Etta Marshall. 

Erie° ■••••"P. L. Pinet. Winfield Davis. 

Eskridge J. H. Houston. 

Florence C. E. St. John Bertha VanHove. 

Girard W. W. Shideler,A.B.. . .Lillian Bell, A. B. 

Glen Elder R. L. Hamilton Lulu Walton, A. B. 

Greenleaf L. P. Wharton, B. S....Mary Lloyd, B. S. 

Hartford Anna H. Brogen Anna H. Brogen. 

Hill City A. E. Lunceford Kathryn Chance. 

Hillsboro A. B. Cope, A. M 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



43 



Name of School Superintendent. Principal. 

Kingman A. W. Ault, A. B Maude Babcock. 

Kinsley D. A. Baugher D. A. Daugher. 

La Cygne J. E. Chamberlain Maud Merriman. 

Lecompton J. W. Murphy, A. B... Alice Hyatt, 

Le Roy E. W. Fent Lena Ernst. 

Lincoln I. L. Mitchell, B. Ped...Nora Dalby. 

Logan S. V. Mallory, B. S. . . . . .Edith Haile, B. Ped. 

Maple Hill Clarence Pearson, A. B.Clara Carr, A. M. 

Moline J. L. Shearer, B. D Miss D. Bates. 

Moran Geo. E. Jones Miss C. J. Bailey. 

Mound City 0. B. Melia J. L. Kyle. 

Nortonville Guy T. Justis, A. B Hattie Freeland, A. B. 

Onaga Supt. French Grace Steller, A. B. 

Oskaloosa W. A. Anderson, A. B. . Sophia Williams. 

Overbrook J. E. Watson, A. B Helen Ingham, A. B. 

Phillipsburg T. 0. Ramsey, A. B Blanche Gebhart, Ph.B. 

Pleasanton J. VanArsdale, A. B. . .Catherine Hosf ord,A.B. 

Rawlins Co., Atwood C. W. McCormick,A.B. 

Reading Elizabeth Finlayson,B.S . George L. Hensley. 

Scranton J. M. Colburn 

Sedan H. G. Adams, B. S E. J. Bennett. 

Sherman Co., Goodland.E. E. Mitchell, Ph. B.. Delia Cardwell, A. B. 

Solomon W. 0. Steen Rhoda Field. 

Stafford Arthur L. Stickel, A.M. .Henrietta H. Hall. 

Saint John Chas. M. Hilleary Joseph H. Byers, A. B. 

St. Mary's N. F. Daum, A. M Miss Moriarty. 

Tonganoxie F. A. Brockett. 

Tulsa, I. T., J. G. Masters 

Valley Falls S. D. Dice, A. B Maud Myers. 

Waterville S. L. Soper, A. B Abby E. Beckwith, A.B. 

Waverly 0. D. Coover Ida M. Morrison. 

Weir R. Rankin Eva DeWeese. 

Wetmore Jos. I. Knott Hulda L. Ise. 

Wilson H. Coover Agnes Clark. 



Class 4. 

Schools named in this list offer courses that have been approved by 
the University, but they have not yet fulfilled other conditions for a 
credited relations. 

Altoona H. C. Duckworth. 

Boling Harriet M. Woodward. 

Buffalo H. E. Clewell. 

Burr Oak F. Eaton, B. S Inga Dahl. 



44 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Name of School. Superintendent. Principal. 

Cheney T. F. Kabler. 

Corning W. R. Anthony. 

Formoso G. W. Kleihege, B. S. 

Gardner J. W. Gowans, A. B. 

Glasco E. C. Troemper. 

Gypsum J. E. Coe, A. B. 

Havensville B. F. Sinclair, A. B. 

Hoisington J. J. Caldwell. 

Irving R. M. Lockridge. 

Kineaid Thos. E. Osborn. 

Lane Co D. E. Hagilund, A. B. 

Lansing Jas. B. Kelsey. 

Lin wood Erwin E. Heath. 

Little River I. C. Meyer. 

Lorraine J. C. Anderson, B. P. 

Louisburg J. E. Stroud. 

Marquette Chas. E. Davis. 

Scandia G. E. Thorpe. 

Scott Co R. Bullimore. 

Sylvan Grove Fred Cooper, A. B. 

Syracuse H. E. Walter, A. B Effie Markwell. 

Wathena V. E. Postma Edna S. Whitney. 

Wellsville J. W. Roberts, A. B.... Ellen Cos. 

Westmoreland F. W. Comfort Nellie McClure, Ph. B. 

Williamsburg J. S. Lyon. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



45 



The College Courses. 

There are five regular courses in the College of Liberal Arcs 
leading to the Baccalaureate degrees of Arts, Philosophy and 
Science. Each of these courses is four years in length. Each year 
is divided into two semesters of equal length. The total number of 
semester hours required for graduation from any of these courses 
is one hundred and twenty-six. Each student is expected to take 
sixteen hours work per week during the Freshman, Sophomore and 
Junior years and fifteen hours per week during the Senior year. 

CLASS RANK. 

Students who are conditioned in not to exceed three units 
and who have earned less than thirty-two hours of college credit, 
wil be ranked as Freshmen. Students who have passed all condi- 
tions, and who have earned thirty-two, but less than sixty-four 
hours of credit, are ranked as Sophomores. In like manner those 
who have earned sixty-four hours or more, and less than ninety- 
six hours of credit are classed as Juniors, while those who have 
earned ninety-six hours or more, and less than one hundred and 
twenty-six hours of credit, are ranked as Seniors, and are entitled 
at the close of their fourth year of residence study to the Bac- 
calaureate degree corresponding to the group of courses which they 
have selected. 

MASTER'S DEGREE. 

The Master's Degree will be conferred on any graduate of 
this institution of three years' standing who shall pursue a syste- 
matic course of study under the direction of the college faculty, 
and who shall pass a satisfactory examination thereon. The de- 
gree is also conferred on graduates of the College who have com- 
pleted a three years' professional course. After June 1909, no 
Master's Degree will be conferred except on written or oral ex- 
amination based on resident study or its equivalent. 

Every candidate for a Baccalaureate Degree, who, in addition 
to the 126 hours required in the under-graduate course, shall 
have earned 30 hours of advance credit, will be granted a Master's 
Degree, "provided: 

I. That all extra work to be counted toward the higher 
degree must be passed at a grade of "B" or higher. 

II. That twenty of the thirty hours must be taken in some 
one of the groups of instruction as the major subject, and ten 
hours shall be arranged for in some other department as a minor. 

III. That no course may be counted toward a Master's De- 



46 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



gree unless it has been approved as such by the head of the de- 
partment concerned, and no required courses may be counted for 
Master's credit. 

IV. That the Master's Degree will be awarded not earlier 
than one year after the conferring of thje Baccalaureate Degree, 
and then only on the presentation of a thesis giving evidence of 
wide, careful, and thoroughly digested reading. 

Note: A diploma fee of Five Dollars will be required for 
every Master's Degree conferred. 

TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES. 

Ottawa University is an accredited college under the state 
laws of 1893 and 1899. As such graduates who have taken during 
their course the philosophy of education, history of education, 
school laws, methods of teaching and school management receive 
a three-years state certificate which may be exchanged for a life 
certificate after two years have been spent in successful teaching. 



GROUPS LEADING TO SPECIFIC DEGREES. 



THE CLASSICAL GROUP. 



Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

This group lays special stress upon the classical languages. 
It is recommended for ministerial students and others who want 
the broadest culture. 



FRESHMAN. 



Fall Semester. 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

Rhetoric 

Elective 



II 
I 
I 
I 



Spring Semester. 

Mathematics Ill 3 

Latin II 3 

Greek H 5 

Chemistry 15 



SOPHOMORE. 



Latin Ill 2 

Greek Ill 5 

French IA or German -IA.. 5 

History I 3 

English VIII 1 



Latin IV 2 

Greek IV 5 

French IB or German IB... 5 

History II 3 

English IX 1 



JUNIOR. 

Psychology 3 Psychology 

English X 3 English . . 

Elective 10 Elective . . 



... 3 
XI 3 
.. 10 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



47 



SENIOR. 

Political Economy 3 Sociology 3 

Ethics 2 Christian Evidences 3 

Elective 10 Elective 9 

THE SCIENCE GROUP. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

This group lays special stress upon the natural sciences and is 
intended to present a general survey of the scientific field. There 
is opportunity through the elective system of specializing in some 
one science during the Junior and Senior years. 

FRESHMAN. 



Fall Semester. 



Mathematics II 2 

German I A 5 

Rhetoric I 5 

General Biology I 3 

Elective 1 



Spring Semester. 



Mathematics Ill 3 

German IB 5 

Chemistry I 5 

General Biology II 2 

Elective 1 



SOPHOMORE. 

Mathematics IV and V 5 Mathematics VI 2 

Chemistry II 5 *Mathematies VII or Elective 3 

Zoology I 3 Chemistry Ill 5 

Histology I 2 Zoology II 3 

English VIII 1 Histology II 2 

English IX 1 

JUNIOR. 

Psychology 3 Psychology 3 

English X 3 English XI 3 

Electives 10 Electives 10 

SENIOR. 

Political Economy 3 Sociology 3 

Ethics 2 Christian Edivences 3 

Electives 10 Electives 9 

•Prerequisite to Physics III and IV. 



THE PHILOSOPHICAL GROUP. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

This group includes but one of the classical languages. It- 
gives special attention to the Modern Languages. It aims to 
meet the need of students who wish to study literature, but who 
do not care to pursue both 1 the classical languages. 



48 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



FRESHMAN. 



Fall Semester. 

Mathematics II 2 

Latin I 3 

German IA 5 

Rhetoric I 5 

Elective 1 



Spring Semester. 

Mathematics Ill 3 

Latin II 3 

German IB 5 

Chemistry I 5 



Latin Ill 2 

German II 4 

French IA or Elective 5 

History I 3 

English VIII 1 

Elective 1 



SOPHOMORE 

Latin 



IV 2 

German IH 4 

French IB or Elective 5 

History II 3 

English IX 1 

Elective 1 



JUNIOR. 

Psychology 3 Psychology 

English X 3 English .. 

Elective 10 Elective . . 



... 3 
XI 3 
10 



SENIOR. 

Political Economy 3 Sociology 3 

Ethics 2 Christian Evidences 3 

Electives 10 Electives 9 



THE PRE-ENGINEERING GROUP. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

This group is especially planned to meet the needs of those 
students who desire a thorough college course but who wish to 
unite with it considerable engineering work. Mathematics and 
Physical Science are the prominent elements. Students who. com- 
plete this course will have finished about the first two years of an 
engineering course. 



FRESHMAN. 



Fall Semester. 

Mathematics II 2 

German IA or French IA. . . 5 

Rhetoric I 5 

Mech. Drawing II 3 

Free-hand Drawing I 1 



Spring Semester. 

Mathematics Ill 3 

German IB or French IB . . . 5 

Chemistry I 5 

Mechanical Drawing III 2 

Free-hand Drawing I 1 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



49 



SOPHOMORE. 



Mathematics IV and V 5 

Chemistry II 5 

Mathematics XI 2 

Mecfo. Drawing IV 3 

English VIII 1 



Mathematics VIII 5 

*Physies Ill 5 

Geology I 5 

Elective 1 



Mathematics VI 2 

Mathematics VII 3 

Mechanical Drawing VI 3 

Chemistry Ill 5 

Mechanical Drawing V 2 

English IX 1 

f Mathematics IX or X 5 

*Physics IV 5 

Geology II 3 

English 2 

Elective 1 



JUNIOR. 



SENIOR. 

Political Economy 3 *Physics IV 5 

Ethics 2 Christian Evidences 3 

*Physics Ill 5 Sociology 3 

Elective 5 f Mathematics IX or X 5 

* f Given alternate years. 



THE PRE-MEDICAL GROUP. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

In this course special emphasis is laid upon the Biological 
Sciences. Those who have the study of medicine in mind are 
advised to take this group. 



FRESHMAN. 
Fall Semester. Spring Semester. 

Mathematics II 2 Mathematics Ill 3 

German IA or French LA . . . 5 German IB or French IB 5 

Biology, General I 3 Biology, General II 2 

Rhetoric I 5 Chemistry I 5 

Free-hand Drawing I 1 Free-hand Drawing I 1 



SOPHOMORE. 



Physiology I 3 

Zoology I 3 

Histology I 2 

Chemistry II 5 

English VIII 1 

Electives 2 



Physiology II 3 

Zoology II 3 

Histology II 2 

Chemistry Ill 5 

English IX 1 

Electives 2 



50 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



JUNIOR. 

Psychology 3 Psychology 3 

•Physics I 3 *Physics II 3 

Chemistry IV 3 Chemistry V 2 

English X 3 English XI 3 

Electives 4 Cytology 3 

Electives 2 

SENIOR. 

Political Economy 3 Sociology 3 

Ethics 2 Christian Evidences 3 

Physiology Ill 5 Botany Ill 2 

Electives 7 Electives 5 

* Given in 1907-8 and every second year thereafter. 



Department of Study. 

The following pages contain a full statement of the courses 
of study offered to the college students arranged by departments. 
The work required in each of the five regular courses is outlined 
on the preceding pages. Students wishing to do elective work in 
the college are permitted to take such subjects as their previous 
training has fitted them to pursue. In each case the final decision 
will rest with the instructor in charge of that particular subject. 

ART 

For the courses in this department see the outline as it is 
presented in the description of the Art courses in the portion of 
the catalog devoted to The School of Fine Arts. Every student 
who expects to teadh in the public or high schools is advised to 
take a course in Free-hand drawing. A special fee is attached 
to these courses. 

For credits allowed for this work see The School of Fine Arts. 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE. 

This is a christian institution and strong emphasis is placed 
upon the place of the Bible in literature and in the development of 
life. The courses offered are planned with a view of giving the 
student a general view of Biblical history and a method of 
Biblical study. 

L— The Bible, its manuscripts, history, translations, literary 
forms and historical sidelights. Two hours, Fall Semester. Elec- 
tive for Juniors and Seniors. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



II. — The Messages of the Prophets. A study of the rise of 
prophetism including an analysis of several of the books of the 
prophets. Two hours, Spring Semester. Elective for Juniors 
and 'Seniors. 

III. — 'Old Testament History. Three hours, Fall Semester,. 

1907, elective for all college students. 

IV. — New Testament History. Three hours, Spring Semester,. 

1908, elective for all college students. 

Besides these courses, for which credit is given, the Christian 
Associations provide Bible classes for each class for which no 
college credit is given. These student classes are led by some 
capable students. 

BIOLOGY. 

1 — General Biology. The more simple laws of life, and the- 
relation between plants and animals are presented under this 
topic. Laboratory work on typical representatives of the lower 
orders of plants and animals forms a large part of the course. 
This is designed as introductory to the advanced courses in Bot- 
any and Zoology, as well as for those who desire a general knowl- 
edge of the laws of life. 

Fall Semester, three hours, required of Scientific and Pre- 
Medical Freshmen, elective for Classical and Philosophical Juniors 
and Seniors. 

II.— A continuation of course I, Spring Semester, three hours, 
BOTANY. 

I. — Cryptogamic Botany. Algae, fungi, liver-worts, mosses, 
and ferns. Two lectures and one laboratory exercise a week. 

Fall Semester, three hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

II. — Morphology, Histology, and Physiology of Flowering 

Plants. Preparation of twenty-five slides. Open to those who 
have taken Histology. 

Spring Semester, three hours, elective for Juniors and Sen- 
iors. 

III. — Bacteriology. A study of typical forms of pathogenic- 
and nonpathogenic bacteria. Culture methods, inoculation, ster- 
ilization, prevention of disease, etc. Open to those who have- 
had Histology and Advanced Physiology. 

Two hours, Spring Semester, required of Seniors registered 



52 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



in the pre-medical group; elective for others who are qualified 
to carry the work. 

CHEMISTRY. 

There are three laboratories for this department in Science 
Hall: one devoted to General Chemistry with equipment for 
thirty students; a second for Advanced Chemistry; a third for 
special tests and gravimetric experiments. 

I. — General Chemistry. Lectures and recitations on the chem- 
ical elements, their compounds, and the laws of chemical change. 
The lectures are thoroughly illustrated by experiments. The stu- 
dent is required to work in the chemical laboratory under the 
direction of the instructor four hours each week, to make appro- 
priate experiments connected with the elements studied, and to 
tabulate his results. Text-book, Remsen's Briefer Course. 

Spring Semester, five hours, required of all Freshmen. 

II. — Qualitative Analysis, The occurence, methods of prep- 
aration, properties, and uses of the metals; their important com- 
pounds with their separation and determination, together with 
the identification of acid radicals. The complete analysis of easy 
unknown compounds is required. The identification of some of 
the metallic elements, by means of the spectroscope, is given. 
Lectures on Ionization, Solutions, Chemical Action, Methods of 
Analysis. 

Fall Semester, five hours, required of Scientific Pre-Medical 
and Pre-Engineering Freshmen, elective for others. 

III. — Quantitative Analysis. Both volumetric and gravimetric 
analyses are made. Occasional lectures on the application of 
Chemistry to other sciences and its relation to the various voca- 
tions of life. 

Spring Semester, five hours, required of Scientific Pre-Medical 
and Pre-Engineering Sophomores, elective for others. 

IV. — Organic Chemistry. The study of the compounds of 
carbon through the aliphatic series. Lectures and Remsen's Or- 
ganic Chemistry as a text. Laboratory work illustrating the text 
and the preparation of easy organic compounds. 

Fall Semester, three hours, required of Pre-medical Sopho- 
mores, elective for others. 

V. — Lecture Course. Dealing with the history and develop- 
ment of Chemistry, including a discussion of the periodic law, and 
its influence in chemical work. The recent advances made in 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



53 



Physical Chemistry and the methods of work are given attention. 
Fall Semester, three hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

VI.— Physiological Chemistry. The products of the physio- 
logical processes. The chemistry of the life process; dietetics, 
and other kindred subjects. Lectures, and laboratory work. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

Normal Science.— This course is offered to those who expect to 
teach the different subjects included in a general Science Course. 
Lectures on the methods of teaching, laboratory preparations and 
materials. 

CYTOLOGY. 

A course dealing with the structure and functions of the cell, 
with methods of work; special reference to the developmental 
phenomena of cell life, and the various problems centering upon 
the cell as the mechanism of hereditary transmission. Open to 
those who have taken Histology. 

Three hours, Spring Semester. Required of Pre-medical Jun- 
iors, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

EDUCATION. 

I. — The Philosophy of Education. Definition, scope, aim and 
method of education as applied to man. The theory of physical 
education. Subjective and objective activities of mind, the theory 
of intellection, perception, imagination, memory, thought, activi- 
ties of the will in relation to society, the ethical judgment, logic, 
ethics, and religion. The historical application of theoretical edu- 
cation in specific systems. 

Class lectures, assigned reading of not less than 1,000 pages, 
reported in the form of abstracts every second week. 

Fall Semester, four hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 
Open to others only by special permission. 

II. — School Methods. The psychological elements of educa- 
tion. The child, its development, laws of growth, and potential 
powers. The teacher, his functions, opportunities, and limitations. 
The curriculum; its content, the relation and sequence of its parts, 
modes of development and presentation. The ideal; mental, moral 
and physical development; modes of aiding each. 

Spring Semester, five hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors of 
the College course only, unless by express permission of the in- 
structor or of the President. 

III. — School Management. The mechanism of the educx- 



54 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



tional process. Hygiene; child-growth, physical and mental, lim- 
its of activity, care of the body and proper use of the sense or- 
gans. The apparatus: the building, its architecture, ventilation, 
warming, lighting, sanitation, furniture. Management: discipline, 
curriculum, program, the act of teaching. 

Spring Semester, five hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors 
of the College course only, unless by special permission of the 
instructor or of the President. 

Students will be required to read in connection with the two 
courses above announced not less than 2,000 pages of assigned 
Literature. All reading assigned must be reported in the form 
of abstracts due each second week. 

IV. — The History of Education. A careful review of the 
progress of educational ideas and methods from the earliest times 
to the present. The subject will be treated in two divisions, the 
first dealing with Pre-Christian education, and the second covering 
the history of education from the time of Christ to the present. 
The two parts of the course may be elected separately, and a 
credit of 2y 2 semester hours will be allowed for each halt so 
selected. 

The work of the course will be conducted by lectures, writ- 
ten quizzes, and assigned reading on which abstracts will be re- 
quired every second week. Not less than 2,000 pages of read- 
ing must be done by t'hose desiring credit for the entire course, 
and not less than 1,000 pages bj those desiring credit for either 
half of the work. 

Spring Semester, five hours, elective for all Juniors and 
Seniors. 

V. — School Law. Statute laws relating to the organization, 
management, classification, and maintenance of public schools; 
the history of school law. 

Fall Semester, one hour, elective for Collegiate Juniors and 
Seniors. 

Note: Under the state law of Kansas, graduates of the 
College of this University, who shall have taken in connection 
with their college course the five professional courses above an- 
nounced, are entitled without further examination to a three-year 
-late teachers' certificate entitling them to teach in any public 
school in he State of Kansas, and of some other states. If the 
holder of the certificate teaches creditably during two of the thr3e 
years (luring which it is in force, he may secure at the close of 
the third year, without further examination a life certificate. 
Laws, chapter 179, section 2 ) 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



ELOCUTION. 

Attention is called to the course in Elocution or Expression 
as outlined in the section of the catalog devoted to The School of 
Fine Arts. A complete course is offered. It can be taken either 
by itself or in connection with regular college work. A special 
fee is charged for this work. 

For college credits allowed see The School of Fine Arts. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

The equipment for this department is contained in the Uni- 
versity library, and consists of a growing collection of books on 
English literature. 

English Language. 

Ia. — Rhetoric and English Composition. Fall Semester. First 
half, five hours. A course in the principles of composition, with 
themes, recitations, and conferences. Required of all Freshmen. 

lb. — Rhetoric and English Composition. Fall Semester. Sec- 
ond half, five hours. A continuation of Ia, with themes based on 
several of the best English classics. Required of all Freshmen. 

VIII. — Advanced Composition. Fall Semester, one hour. A 
course in composition with especial attention to exposition, argu- 
ment, and persuasion. Required of all Sophomores. 

IX. — Advanced Composition. Spring Semester, one hour. A 
continuation of Course VIII. Required of all Sophomores. 

English Literature. 

III. — Shakspere. Fall Semester, five hours. Lectures and 
recitations upon the life and times of Shakspere. Study and in- 
terpretation of three plays with special attention to Elizabethan 
grammar, literary form, plot construction, and character study*. 
Two theses required. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

IV. — English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Spring 
Semester, five hours. A study of the period from the time of 
Swift to the publication of the Lyrical Ballads. Lectures, crit- 
ical study in class of the writings of this period, library work, 
and the preparation of two theses. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

V. — English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Spring 
Semester, five hours. A general survey of the novelists, essayists, 
and historians of the period. Lectures, critical study in class, 
library work and the preparation of two theses. The authors 



50 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



studied are Aihster^ Scott, Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot, DeQuincey, 
Lamb, Carlyle, Macaulay, Ruskin, Arnold. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors. 

VI. — American Literature. Fall Semester, five hours. Gen- 
eral history with special reference to the work of the best known 
writers. Lectures, critical elas^ study, library work, and the 
preparation of two theses. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

VII. — Chaucer. Spring Semester, two hours. A study and 
interpretation of the Prologue, and three of the Canterbury Tale^. 
Special attention given to the development of the English lan- 
guage. One thesis required. 

X. — English Literature. Fall Semester, three hours. A general 
survey of English, with thesis based on the reading of representa- 
tive authors. Required of all Juniors except Pre-Engineering. 

XI. — English Literature. Spring Semester, three hours. A 
continuation of Course X. Required of all Juniors except Pre- 
Engineering. 

Besides these formal courses the following work in English 
is required of all college students. 

1. — Every Freshman will be required to deliver one declama- 
tion. The class is divided into two sections, and appropriate in- 
struction and drill provided for each student. 

2. — Every candidate for a bachelor's degree in the College of 
Liberal Arts is required in his Senior year to present to the head 
of the department of English, in a form suitable for preservation, 
a thesis of from 2,000 to 5,000 words. The thesis must be on 
some topic in which the student has taken special interest during 
his collegiate course, and should represent his best and maturest 
thought on that subject. The specific topic must be agreed upon 
with the head of the department affected, and registered with the 
Department of English on or before the first day of December; 
the outline of the thesis must be presented for final approval to 
the head of the special department under which the subject select- 
ed properly comes, on or before the fifteenth of February. The 
final draft of the thesis must be presented to the head of the 
English Department on or before the fifteenth of May. No thesis 
will be accepted which does not show signs of creditable accom- 
plishments, or which is defective in its English. All theses be- 
come the property of the University. 

FRENCH. 

To secure the most efficient command of the French language 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



57 



the students are drilled to understand the spoken as well as the 
written language. All of the reacting during the first year is ■made 
the basis for work in composition or conversation. In addition to 
this pihonographs have been added to the equipment and labora- 
tory practice has been adopted. This method enable the students 
to hear a passage repeated till they have absolutely mastered all 
the difficulties it may contain, and it also provides them with an 
unchanging model to which they can strive to conform their own 
pronunciation. The phonetical script of the Association Phone- 
tique has been used in this connection with excellent results. The 
French records used are very clear and good. 

I. — French, A and B. Easy Reading (Whitney's Elementary 
Reader, or an equivalent), Conversation and Composition based 
on the text read. Drill in elementary phonetics, with some use 
of the phonetical script. Practice with the phonograph. Oral 
and written reproduction of stories heard but not seen. Gram- 
mar. The work is done chiefly by means of the students' note 
books. 

Five hours, Fall and Spring Semesters. No credit is given 
the student till the year's work is completed. 

II. — French. Reading, texts of increasing difficulty, one book 
at least in phonetical script. The text prepared is recited, not 
translated. Compositions based on the text read, and rewriting 
of stories told to the class, and very easy lectures. Advanced 
work in grammar. Practice with the phonographs. 

Four hours, Fall Semester. Open to students (having com- 
pleted French I the previous year. Other students are admitted 
to the class only by special arrangement. 

III. — 'Continuation of Course II. 
Four hours. Spring Semester. 

Electives will be offered in this department as may be re- 
quired and time permit. 

GEOLOGY. 

The museum contains a large number of geological specimens 
conveniently arranged in cases and properly numbered which 
serve as laboratory material for these courses. Some field work 
is always done with the classes. The library has a nucleus of 
excellent books for reference. 

I. — -General Geology. LeConte's Elements of Geology is used 
as a text. Occasional lectures on current geological proplems and 
discoveries are given. Excursions to points of local geological 



58 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



interest are made. The collection and classification of not less 
than ten different fossil specimens. The preparation of an ac- 
ceptable thesis on some correlated subject is required at the close 

of the course. 

Fall Semester, five hours, required of all Pre-Engineers and 
Pre-Medieals; elective for others. 

II. — Mineralogy. The composition and physical character of 
the common minerals and rocks likely to be met in everyday ob- 
servation and geological pursuits. The instruction includes both 
laboratory and text book work. 

Spring Semester, three hours, elective for Juniors and Sen- 
iors. Required of pre-engineers. 

III. — Palaeontology. Lectures on the nature and position of 
different fossil groups. The relation which the various pre-his- 
toric fauna and flora bear to each other. The student is expected 
to become familiar with the fossils common in Kansas. 

Fall Semester, three hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

IV. — Economic Geology. As the name indicates, it is the 
practical side that is here made prominent. Some of the topics 
of economic importance considered are : common rock and vein- 
forming minerals, origin of ore deposits, mining terms and meth- 
ods, coal, petroleum, natural gas, clays, geological fertilizers, the 
relation of geology to agriculture. 

Spring Semester, three hours, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

GERMAN. 

The aim of the work in this department is to give the stud- 
ents a serviceable command of the German language, and also a 
sound and reliable training for any kind of advanced linguistic 

study. 

To secure the first end the students are drilled to under- 
stand readily the sipoken as well as the written language, and 
to acquire a steadily increasing vocabulary, which they are ex- 
pected to use correctly from the very beginning, both in speak- 
ing and in writing. Practically nothing is read during the first 
year that is not made the basis of work in composition or con- 
versation. 

I. — German, A and B. Easy reading, an elementary reader. 
Composition and conversation based on the text read. Oral and 
written reproduction of stories heard but not seen. Grammai*, 
taught chiefly by means of the students' note-books. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



39 



Five hours, Fall and Spring Semesters. No credit will be 
given the student till the year's work is completed. Required of 
all Philosophical and Scientific Freshmen who enter the college 
without German, and of Sophomores in the Arts Course. 

II. — German. Reading, texts of increasing difficulty, which 
are recited, not translated in class. Written outlines of the books 
read, reproduction of stories heard, easy letters. Drill in ad- 
vanced grammar. 

Four hours, Fall Semester. 

III. — German. Modern Prose Writers. Outside reading as- 
signed to the students. (Some of this reading may be of a scien- 
tific nature.) Written and oral reports by the class, easy lectures. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of all students of 
whom Course II is required. Open as an elective to all students 
having completed German II. 

Electives will be offered in this department whenever a legiti- 
mate demand for them rises and the department can furnish the 
required time and equipment. These electives will give the stu- 
dent opportunity for more advanced work in composition, for 
rapid reading and work in literature. The courses will be open 
to students only on consultation with the head of the department. 



THE GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

The work is planned with the primary aim of helping the 
students to understand and appreciate the Greek element in the 
civilization of today. On the linguistic side the aim is to enab'e 
the student as soon as possible to read the simpler of those master- 
pieces which have most powerfully influenced subsequent litera- 
ture and thought. Thus the courses prescribed for candidates for 
the degree of A. B. include an introduction to Plato and Homer, 
while electives provide for the continued study of these authors 
and an introduction to the drama. The stereoptican, stereoscopes, 
and photographs are freely used as aids in reproducing the ma- 
terial aspects of contemporary Greek life. Students for the min- 
istry will each year be given the opportunity to study New Testa- 
ment Greek. Each year there will also be opportunity for those 
who do not know the language to study some aspect of Greek 
civilization. 

I. — The Elements of Greek. Mastery of the inflectional sys- 
tem and a vocabulary of about five hundred words; elements of 
syntax, exercises, and simple connected readings. In the acquisi- 
tion of vocabulary, particular attention is given to the composition 



60 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



and derivation of words and to Latin and English cognates and 
derivatives. 

Five hours, Fall Semester, required of classical Freshmen and 
elective for all other students in the college. 

II. — Xenophon's Anabasis. The reading of the first book and 
as much of the second as time will permit, systematic attention to 
the acquisition of vocabulary, studies in Greek syntax. 

Five hours, Spring Semester, required of classical Freshmen 
and elective for other college students. 

III. — Plato: The Apology, Krito, and Selections from the 
Phaedo. These selections center about the personality of Socrates, 
probably the most fascinating character of classical antiquity, and 
include his defense when put on trial for corrupting the youths, 
and an account of conversations with his friends immediately be- 
fore his death. With the reading of the text there are studies in 
Athenian life and art, illustrated by lantern and stereoscope. 

Five hours, Fall Semester, required of classical Sophomores 
and elective for all college students who have taken I and II. 

IV. — Homer: The Odyssey. The selections include the most 
interesting portions of books I— XII. Homeric vocabulary is sys- 
tematically studied from the beginning. The primary purpose of 
the course will be to enable the student to read the Homeric poems 
with readiness and pleasure. "Mycenaean" life and art from 
the subject of supplementary studies. 

Five hours, Spring Semester, required of classical Sophomores 
and elective for all college students who have had courses I— III 
or their equivalent. 

Elective Courses. 

Open to all students who have had courses I-IV or their 
equivalent. 

VII — Plato, Selected Dialogues. Readings from the less tech- 
nical dialogues illustrating Plato's brilliancy of style, and at the 
same time affording an introduction to his ethical, social, and 
political ideas. These ideas are discussed in their relation to 
present day problems. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, 1907. 

VIII.— Homer. The reading and interpretation of passages 
of particular literary or human interest, the selections being 
chiefly from the Iliad. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, 1908. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



61 



IX. — Introduction to the Study of New Testament Greek. 

Study of the characteristics of the dialect, especially divergencies 
from Attic syntax. The passages read will be from the synoptic 
Gospels or the Acts. 

Two or more hours, Fall Semester, 1907. 

X. — Pauline Epistles. The reading of selections with the 
study of important words. 

Two or more hours, Fall Semester, 1908. 

XIV. — Aristophanes and Greek Comedy. Selected plays read 
in the Greek and translated. Studies in Athenian private life and 
the antiquities of the Greek theater. 

Three hours, Spring* Semester, 1909. 

XV. — Greek Tragedy. The Medea of Euripides and the Anti- 
gone of Sophocles studied as an introduction to Greek tragedy. 
The characteristics of ancient and modern tragedy are compared. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, 1908. 

XXI. — The History of Greek Art. Lectures, assigned read- 
ings, <md the preparation of papers. The various topics are illus- 
trated by the use of the stereoptieon, the sterescope, and a good 
collection of photographs. 

Two hours, Spring Semester, 1909. 

XXV. — Plato in English. The study and analysis of selec- 
tions chiefly from the Republic, Plato's most comprehensive, sug- 
gestive, and brilliant work. Emphasis is placed on those elements 
which have been and still are influential in shaping the world's 
thought on ethics, politics, sociology, education and religion. The 
course may be taken as a supplement of course VII, but it is open 
to those who have no knowledge of Greek. 

HISTOLOGY. 

I. — A course in the various phases of Histological Technique; 
injecting, hardening, staining, cutting and mounting. Prepara- 
tion and mounting forty sections of typical tissues. Lectures 
and laboratory work. 

Two hours, Fall Semester, required of Scientific and Pre- 
Medical Sophomores. 

II. — A continuation of course I, Spring Semester, two hours. 

HISTORY. 

In some of the courses in this department text books are used. 
In other courses the Library method is pursued. Considerable 



62 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



written work is required in recitation and review. Quiz exercises, 
inductive discussions and tests are frequent. 

Courses I and II are required of Classical and Philosophical 
Sophomores. Courses III-VIII are elective for Juniors and 
Seniors. 

I. — Mediaeval History. Fall Semester, three hours. 

II. — Modern History. Spring Semester, three hours. 

HI.— General History of England. Fall Semester, 1908, elec- 
tive. 

IV. — History of the Reformation. Spring Semester, 1903, 

V. — History of the European Nations in the 19th Century. 

VI. — History of the Philanthropic Institutions in the 19th 
Century. Spring Semester, 1909, three (hours, elective. 

VII. — Colonial and Constitutional History of the United States 

VIII. — Constitutional and Political History of the United 
States from the War of 1812. Spring Semester, 1909, three hours, 
from the War of 1812. Spring Semester, 1909, three hours, 
elective. 



THE LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

Students entering college with but three entrance units of 
Latin will make up the Vergil or Cicero, as the case may be, in 
the Academy, receiving college credit to the extent of six semester 
hours. No student may without special permission undertake 
the courses described below unless he has taken, or is taking, the 
work corresponding to the fourth entrance unit. 

Courses I-IV are required of all candidates for the degree 
of A. B. or Ph. B. They are so arranged as to include represen- 
tative passages of permanent human interest distributed through 
the period from Terence to Tacitus, with such studies in antiqui- 
ties and in literary and political history as will tend to give a com- 
prehensive view of Roman civilization and Rome's contributijn 
to the life of the modern man. These courses are given every 
year and should be taken in the order indicated. 

Courses V-XII are elective. They comprise two groups which 
are offered alternate years. Not more than two of these courses 
arc given in any one semester. In 1907-8 the group will be 
V, VI, IX, and X. 

In arranging the^e ele< fives the needs of several classes of 
students have been considered. Those intending to teach second- 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



83 



ary Latin should be particularly interested in VI, X, and XII; 
students of general literature in VII, and XII; students of his- 
tory in V, and VI; scientific students in IX; and students of the- 
ology and philosophy in VII, VIII, and IX; while any who 
look forward to graduate work in Latin will find open to them 
throughout the Junior and Senior years courses suited to their 
needs. 

I. — Livy. Selections from Books I, XXI, and XXII. System- 
atic review of Latin syntax in connection with exercises in Latin 
composition based upon the text read. Studies in early Roman 
history. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, required of Freshmen who are 
candidates for t'he A. B. and the Ph. B. degrees. 

II. — Latin Comedy and Cicero's Letters. The Phormio of 
Terence or the Captivi of Plautus, with attention to the simpler 
metres, and to archaic forms and constructions so far as necessary 
for the understanding of the text. The rapid reading of selec- 
tions from Cicero's Letters with emphasis on the biographical 
and historical content. Studies in the political and literary his- 
tory of the Republic. Characteristics of the Latin of every-day 
life as illustrated by the comedy and the letters. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, required of Freshmen who are 
candidates for the A. B. or Ph. B. degrees. 

Ill and IV. — Horace, Pliny and Tacitus. Selections from 
Horace, chiefly of the Odes and Epodes but including several of 
the Satires of greatest biographical interest. Metrical reading 
of the Latin, Mythological and historical references. Selections 
from the Agricola and Germania of Tacitus. Letters of Pliny at 
sight. Studies in the literary and political history of the early 
empire and in Roman private life. 

Two hours, Fall and Spring Semesters, required of Sophomores 
who are candidates for the A. B. or Ph. B. degree. 

V. — Cicero's Letters and Roman Political Institutions. This 
course is based on a selection of the letters entirely different 
from that used in II. Political and constitutional references are 
emphasized. "About Roman Political Institutions" is studied. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, 1908, elective for all who havo 
completed Course IV. 

VI. — Tacitus and Juvenal. Most of the time is given to 
the Annals, Tacitus' most characteristic work. His style, syntax, 
and diction are studied. The essentially satirical temper of the 
annals is illustrated by the study of selections from the Satires 
of Juvenal. 



64 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Three hours, Spring Semester, 1909, elective for all who have 

passed IV. 

VII. — The Epistles and Satires of Horace. Interpretation of 
the Ars Poetica and the more significant literary epistles and 
satires with particular attention to the questions of literary 
history and criticism involved. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, 1908, elective for all who have 
completed the required courses. 

VIII. — The De Finibus of Cicero. This exposition and crit- 
icism of the leading ethical theories of antiquity will be inter- 
preted in comparison with the corresponding types of modern 
ethical opinion. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, 1908, elective for all who have 
completed the required courses. 

IX. — Luceretius' De Rerum Natura. The selections made 
will illustrate the poetic genius and moral earnestness of Lucre- 
tius, as well as the interesting parallels which his physical and 
biological doctrines present to the speculations of modern 
scientists. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, 1908, elective for all who have 
completed the required courses. 

X. — Teachers ' Course, (a) A survey of Latin Grammar in 
view of recent investigations, with a comparison of the leading 
school grammars, the grammatical study of portions of the text 
commonly read in secondary schools, and the writing of Latin 
exercises, (b) Informal lectures on methods of teaching secondary 
Latin, bibliography for Latin teachers, and the bearing of the 
study of manuscripts, inscriptions, and coins on the interpreta- 
tion of ancient literature. 

Three hours. Spring Semester, 1909, elective for those who 
intend to teach Latin. 

XI. — Roman Comedy. One comedy of Plautus will be care- 
fully studied from both the literary and the linguistic point of 
view, and one or two others will be more rapidly read. In case 
the class is unfamiliar with Terence, one play may be from that 
author. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, 1907, elective for all who have 
completed the required courses. 

XII. — Vergil. Georgics and Bucolics. This course provides 
an introduction to two new types of Latin poetry, including what 
Maekail has called "The most splendid literary production of the 
Empire." Prospective teachers of the Aeneid find here an oppor- 
tunity to extend their knowledge of Vergil. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



65 



Three hours, Fall Semester, 1908, elective for all who have 
completed the required courses. 

MATHEMATICS AND MECHANICAL DRAWING. 

The department is prepared to furnish instruction in pure 
and applied mathematics. The former courses are provided for 
the general student, while the latter are offered for the benefit of 
those who desire to prepare for an engineering course. Students 
-who take the Pre-Engineering course will, upon its completion, 
have finished about the first two years of an Engineering Course. 

The equipment for Mathematics consists of models of sur- 
faces of revolution, ellipsoids, paraboloids, and hyperboloids, made 
of plaster and thread. Also wooden models of elementary geo- 
metrical solids and intersections of the same; spherical black- 
boards; blackboards ruled for rectangular and polar coordinates; 
trigonometric models showing the functions of any angle; pro- 
tractors, compasses and other articles helpful to the student of 
mathematics. 

The equipment for surveying consists of a Gurley engineer's 
transit with vertical circle and stadia wires; a Keuffel and Esser 
engineer's Y level; rods, chains, tapes, slide rules, planimeters^ 
aneroids and other minor instruments. 

MATHEMATICS. 

I. — Solid Geometry. Four hours, Spring Semester. Required 
of all Freshmen not offering Solid Geometry for entrance. 

II. — College Algebra. Review of Academic Algebra; graphie 
representation; binomial theorem; series. Two hours, Fall Se- 
mester. Required of all Freshmen. 

III. — College Algebra. Permutations and combinations; com- 
plex numbers; theory of equations; determinants; logarithms. 

Three hours, Spring Semester. Required of all Freshmen. 

IV. — Plane Trigonometry. The six trigonometric functions; 
principal formulas of plane trigonometry; solution of triangles 
and practical problems. Five hours, Fall Semester, for the first 
nine weeks. Required of Scientific and Pre-Engineering Sopho- 
mores. 

V. — Analytic Geometry. The straight line and circle. Five 
hours, Fall Semester, following plane trigonometry. Required of 
Scientific and Pre-Engineering Sophomores. 

VI. — Analytic Geometry. . Conic sections; higher plane curves; 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG. 



solid analytics. Two hours, Spring- Semester. Required of Scien- 
tific and Pre-Engineering Sophomores. 

VII. — Differential Calculus. Fundamental principles; deriva- 
tives; applications to geometry and mechanics; maxima and min- 
ima; indeterminate series. Three hours, Spring- Semester. Re- 
quired of Pre-Engineering Sophomores. 

VIII. — Continuation of Differential Calculus, followed by In- 
tegration; definite integrals; application to lengths, areas, and 
volumes. .Five hours. Fall Semester. Required of Pre-Engineer- 
ing Juniors. 

IX. — Analytic Mechanics. Geometry of motion; kinematics; 

statics; dynamics of a particle and of a rigid body. Five hours, 
Spring Semester. Offered on alternate years. Required of Pre- 

engineering Juniors and Seniors. 

X. — Surveying. Engineers' instruments, their construction 
and adjustment ; method of making and platting land, topographic, 
mining, and hydrographic surveys; sources of errors and the 
means of controlling the precision of field-work; leveling and 
earthwork. Five hours, Spring Semester. Alternates with Analytic 
Mechanics. Required of Pre-Engineering Juniors and Seniors. 

XI. — Elementary Mechanics. An elementary course, requir- 
ing a knowledge of elementary physics and plane trigonometry. 
Two hours, Fall Semester. Required of Pre-Engineering Soph- 
omores. 

XII. — Descriptive Astronomy. An introductory course cover- 
ing the general principles of the science. Two hours, Spring- 
Semester. Elective for all Juniors and Seniors. 

XIII. — Teachers' Course. Designed for students preparing fcb 
become teachers of mathematics. This course consists of (1) 

ry of Mathematics, reading, and lectures; (2) discussions on 
the best methods of presenting the subject; (3) practice teach- 
ing. Two hours, Spring Semester. Open to students who have 
-completed courses I- VIII. 

MECHANICAL DRAWING. 

I. — Free-hand Drawing. Drawing with pencil and pen aril 
ink. One hour in both Fall and Spring Semesters. Required of 
all Pre-Engineering and Pre-Medical Freshmen. 

II. — Elements of Drawing. Geometrical constructions and var- 
ious simple exercises, with abundant practice in freehand letter- 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



67 



ing. Three hours, Fall Semester. Required of Pre-Engineering 
Freshmen. 

III. — Mechanical Drawing. Orthographic, isometric, and cabi- 
net projections. Two hours, Spring Semester. Required of Pre- 
Engineering Freshmen. 

IV. — Mechanical Drawing. Sections and intersections; free- 
hand lettering; shades, shadows, and perspective. Three hours, 
Fall Semester. Required of Pre-Engineering Sophomores. 

V. — Mechanical Drawing. Working drawings; tracing; blue 
printing; elements of machine drawing. Two hours, Spring Se- 
mester. Required of Pre-Engineering Sophomores. 

VI. — Descriptive Geometry. Problems relating to the point, 
line, and plane. The generation and classification of lines and 
surfaces; planes tangent to surfaces of single and double curva- 
ture; intersections, developments, and revolutions. Three hours, 
Spring Semester. Required of Pre-Engineering Sophomores. 

MUSIC. 

We believe that some knowledge of Music is essential to any 
broad culture. Therefore a Conservatory of Music is maintained 
as a part of the University. For the complete description of the 
courses there offered see the outlines as presented in that section 
of the catalog devoted to The School of Fine Arts. For college 
credits allowed for this work see The School of Fine Arts. 

A special fee is attached to these courses. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

I. — Psychology. An introductory course, consisting of lec- 
tures and class discussion based on a text. The physical bas's 
of consciousness, the sensory, nervous and motor mechanism, the 
phases and phenomena of mental activity, normal and abnormal 
states of consciousness; the psychology of the mob, of advertising, 
of salesmanship. 

Three hours, Fall and Spring Semesters. Required of all 
Juniors. 

II. — Logic. The laws of thought, Induction, Deduction, Prop- 
ositions, Syllogisms, Fallacies. Class exercises based on a text 
book. 

Three hours, Spring Semester. 

III. — Ethics. Lectures, class discussion, prescribed reading. 



68 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



The theory of ethics, theories of the moral ideal, the moral Ufa, 
moral growth, metaphysical implications. 

Two hours, Fall Semester, required of all Seniors. 

IV. — Christian Evidence. Lectures and text book. The met- 
aphysical basis of theism, arguments for the existence of God, 
the grounds for belief in the work and message of Christ and 
in Christian experience. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, required of all Seniors. 

V. — The History of Philosophy. An outline course, stating 
the problems of philosophy, and outlining the progressive develop- 
ment of philosophical theories. Lectures, text and assigned read- 
ing. An introduction to the study of Modern Philosophy. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, elective for all who have finished 
Psychology. 

PHYSIOS. 

A large laboratory in the basement of University Hall is 
used for this department. It is well equipped. Several valuable 
pieces of apparatus have been imported this year. New additions 
are being made constantly as funds may be in hand to purchase 
them. 

I. — Introductory. Lectures and recitations on the laws of 
physical phenomena, the study of sound and heat. The laws of 
forces, statical and dynamical. A knowledge of Mathematics 
through Analytical Geometry is presumed. The effort will be to 
present the subject of Physics as a branch of all science, keeping 
in view the intimate relation in origin and in development, of 
all the phenomena of the universe. 

Fall Semester, three hours, required of Pre-Medieal Sopho- 
mores, elective for others. Offered in 1907-8. 

II. — Light, Electricity and Magnetism. The same method of 
instruction is employed as in Course I. It is intended to give 
the student such a knowledge of the subject as will fit him to un- 
derstand and appreciate the discoveries in electrical science and 
to apply these to the practical problems of the day. In order 
further to stimulate the students to become acquainted with the 
literature of Physics, each is required to prepare a satisfactory 
essay on some subject before the close of this course. Laboratory 
work two days each week during both Semesters. 

Spring Semester, three hours, required of Pre-Medical Juniors 
and Seniors. Offeied in 1907-08. 

III. — Mechanics, Sound and Heat. A course of lectures and 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



69 



recitations designed for Pre-Engineering students. At least one 
laboratory period per week. 

Elective for Scientific Juniors or Seniors who have a working 
knowledge of Analytics and Calculus. Five hours, Fall Semester. 
Required in Pre-Engineering course. Offered in 190S-09 and in 
alternate years thereafter. 

IV.— Light, Electricty, and Magnetism. A continuation of 
Course III. 

Elective for Scientific Juniors and Seniors who have a work- 
ing knowledge of Analytics and Calculus. Spring Semester, five 
hours. Required of Pre-engineering students. Given in 1908-09 
and in alternate years thereafter. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

I. — General Physiology. Lectures and laboratory work. 
Fall Semester, three hours, required of Sophomores registered 

in the pre-medical group. 

II. — Advanced Physiology. A continuation of Course I. A 
study of Neurology or Osteology. The nervous system and its end 
organs, or the human skeleton, as the needs of the class may de- 
mand. Lectures and laboratory work. Open only to those who 
have completed Course I. 

Three hours, Spring Semester, required of Sophomores in the 
ipre-medieal group, elective for others. 

III. — Comparative Physiology and Anatomy. A comparative 
study of mammalian types. Lectures and laboratory work on 
typical forms. The course is especially designed to meet the 
needs of medical candidates. 

Five hours, Fall Semester, required of Seniors registered in 
the premedical group. 

SOCIOLOGY. 

In this department a text book is followed, but students are 
provided with outside reading from books and current literature. 

Discussion on up to date economics and social problems is 
stimulated. 

Written essays constitute a part of the work. 

I. —Political Economy. Fall Semester, three hours, required 
of all Seniors. 

II. — -General Sociology. Spring Semester, three hours, re- 
quired of all Seniors. 



70 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



ZOOLOGY. 

I.— Invertebrate Zoology. The purpose of this course is to 
give the student a definite idea of the principles of the science of 
Zoology as generally accepted by zoologists, in order that he 
may understand the philosophical discussions and writings relat- 
ing to modern doctrine of biology. Lectures and laboratory work 
on typical invertebrate forms. 

Three hours, Fall Semester, required of Scientific and Pre- 
Medical Sophomores, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

II — Vertebrate Zoology. One lecture and one laboratory ex- 
ercise weekly. Open only to those who have taken Course I. 

Spring Semester, three hours, required of Scientific and Pre- 
Medical Sophomores, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 



The Academy. 

The Academy of Ottawa University is maintained in response 
to a widespread demand for a secondary school which shall offer 
instruction of the very best type under distinctly Christian in- 
fluences. 

Students in the Academy are entitled to all the privileges to 
which the students of the other schools are entitled. The library 
and reading room, the gymnasium and athletic grounds, the 
musical, social, literary, and religious societies are all cxpen to 
them within the limitations of their constitutions. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

For entrance to the Academy the student will be expected 
to present credentials showing the satisfactory completion of the 
work of the grade schools. Opportunity will be given to make 
up deficiencies in Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography and Spelling, 
but students who are hampered by entrance deficiencies cannot 
expect to complete the course in the usual time. 

The courses of the Academy are three in number, each leading 
to a diploma, and providing fifteen units of work. A unit m 
the Academy is one study carried through one school year with 
four recitations of one hour each every week. Students who 
'hold a diploma of this Academy may enter without examination 
the College of Ottawa University, or of any of the other schools 
of Kansas and the contiguous states. 

LENGTH OF COURSES THREE YEARS. 

Students who are mature, in good health and ambitious, are 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



71 



encouraged to complete the work of the Academy in three years, 
thereby saving one year of the ordinary high school course. This 
opportunity commends itself at once to students who appreciate 
the value of time, and wfao desire to enter college as soon as- 
possible. Under this schedule the student will carry twenty hours- 
of class room work each week for three years. Careful oversight 
will be maintained over the work and health of each student 
endeavoring to complete his academic course in three years. 

Any student entering the Academy for the first time may 
register in five subjects, but after the first semester the average 
of all his previous grades must be at least "B" or 'he will be 
required to drop one of his studies and spend four years in the 
A cademy. 

Every opportunity consistent with the highest type of work 
will be given to ambitious and energetic students to complete the 
work in three years. It is suggested, however, that those students 
who are young or whose health is not excellent should adopt the 
four year plan. Also those students who wish to take work in the 
School of Fine Arts or some Bible Courses during the time spent 
in the Academy are advised to devote four years to their Academie 
course. Those who complete the course in three years will take 
only what is included in the Schedule of Courses, but those who> 
prefer the four year course must take one extra four hour sub- 
ject or its equivalent for one year from among the eleetives of- 
fered on the following page. 

SCHEDULE OF COURSES. 

As above stated, the courses are three in number, the classical 
and philosophical, and the scientific. The requirement of each o£ 
these courses is as follows. The letters indicate the serial num- 
ber of the course, the numerals show the number of recitations- 
per week. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
Classical and Philosophical Scientific. 

. English A, 4 English A, 4 

^ History A, 4 History A, 4 

Latin A, 4 Latin A, 4 

Mathematics A, 4 Mathematics A, 4 

Physiography A, 4 Physiography A, 4 



^ English B, 4 

.g History B, 4 

ft Latin B, 4 

Mathematics B, 4 

Physiography B, 4 



English B, 4 

History B, 4 

Latin B, 4 

Mathematics B, 4 

Physiography B, 4 



72 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



MIDDLE CLASS. 



English C, 4 

Latin C, 4 

Mathematics C, 4 

Physics A, 4 

Botany A, 4 



English C, 4 

Latin 0, 4 

Mathematics 0, 4 

Physics A, 4 

Botany A, 4 



Endish, 



D, * 

Latin D, 4 

*E Mathematics D, 4 

B, 4 

B, 4 



TO Physics 
Botany. 



English D, 4 



Latin 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Botany 



D, 4 
D, 4 
B, 4 
B, 4 



3 



English E, 4 

Latin E, 4 

Mat-hematics E, 4 

Latin G-, 4 

History C, 4 



SENIOR CLASS. 

English E, 4 

Latin E, 4 

Mathematics E, 4 

History C, 4 

Zoology A, 4 



English F, 4 

g> Latin F, 4 

*C Mathematics F, 4 

«a Latin H, 4 

History D, 4 



Latin F, 4 

English F, 4 

Mathematics F, 4 

History D, 4 

Zoology B, 4 



Students who elect to do the work of the Academy in four 
years may elect from the following group of courses such sub- 
jects as they may desire, except that not more than 20 hours may 
be carried at any one time. Work taken in the college in the 
fourth year of academy work will be credited toward the college 
•degree, but in every case the student will be required to secure 
the written consent of the instructor in charge before he can be 
registered in any college subject. 



From the Business College. 



Fall 

Bookkeeping. 
Stenography . 
Typewriting. 
Telegraphy. 



Spring. 

Bookkeeping. 
Stenography. 
Typewriting. 
Telegraphy. 



Zoology A. 



From the Academy. 



Zoology B. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



73 



From the College. 



Mathematics II. 
Rhetoric I. 
Biology I. 



Mathematics III. 
Chemistry I. 
Biology II. 



Bible Courses. 

Bible A. Life of Christ. Bible B. Founding of the Church. 

CLASSIFICATION. 

Students who have been properly registered, and who have 
completed less than five units of the eourse outlined, are classified 
as Juniors. These who have completed five or more units, but less 
than ten units, are classified as Middle class students; and those 
who have completed ten units are classed as Seniors. On comple- 
tion of the fifteenth unit of work the student is entitled to his 
diploma, and will receive it on the commencement day following, 
providing he has met such other provisions and requirements as 
the University may prescribe. 



Bible A. — The Life of Christ. A survey of the preparation 
of the world for the coming- of Christ, a careful study of the 
times -in which He lived, a harmony of His life as outlined in the 
four Gospels. Two hours, Fall Semester. 

Bible B. — The founding of the Christian church with a careful 
study of the life and journeys of Paul. Two hours, Spring Se- 
mester. 

These courses are planned especially for those students who 
take the course in the Academy in four years. 



A. — Structural and Fhysiological Botany. A general survey 
of the plant world, designed to give the student a comprehensive 
view of the entire vegetable kingdom. Some of the life processes 
of plants, especially those which illustrate the fundamental prin- 
ciples of nutrition, assimilation, growth, irritability, and repro- 
duction are studied. Types of the lower plants as well as of the 
higher are employed in order to show that the process is funda- 
mentally the same in all. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of the Middle Class. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



BIBLE. 



BOTA1STY. 



B. — A Continuation of Course A. Due attention is given to 



74 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



the subject of Plant Ecology. The preparation of a 'herbarium 
and the analysis of a, sufficient number of plants to familiarize 
the student with the methods of plant analysis and classification 
are required. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of the Middle Class. 
ENGLISH. 

The courses in English offered in the Academy are designed 
to give to the student: (1) An accurate, though elementary 
knowledge of the English Language and Literature, and (2) 
systematic practice in simple Prose Composition. 

A. — First Year English. First Semester, 4 hours. Constant 
practice is given in oral expression of thought through class re- 
citation. Written work is required weekly or oftener, chiefly 
upon subjects previously discussed in the class. The chief aim in 
reading is to cultivate a taste for the best literature and an ap* 
preciation of its beauty and worth. Selections are read from 
Scott, Irving, Lowell, Tennyson, and Eliot. A more careful study 
is made of two or three masterpieces. 

B. — Second Semester, 4 hours. A continuation of A. 

C. — Second Year English. First Semester, 4 hours. For 
general description see English A. Reading from Shakspere, 
Coleridge, Dickens, Macaulay, Addison and Steele. 

D. — Second Semester, 4 hours. A continuation of C. 

E. — Third Year English. First Semester, 4 hours. For gen- 
eral description see English A. Reading from Chaucer, Shaks- 
pere, Milton, Eliot, and Burke. 

F. — Second Semester, 4 hours. A continuation of. E. 

In addition to the formal work in English, special instruction 
is given in the principles of correct speech and address, and in 
the writing and pronouncing of orations. Detailed information 
relative to this work is given to the classes affected at stated 
times in the course of the school-year. 

HISTORY. 

The student selecting the courses in history here described 
will have secured a rapid bird's-eye view of the important epochs 
of human history. The Academy is fully provided with books, 
charts and maps for the proper presentation of this work. 

A. — Ancient History. 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of 
Juniors. Text: Ancient History, Meyers. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



75 



B. — Ancient History. 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of 
Juniors. Text: Ancient History, Meyers. 

C. — Mediaeval History. 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of 
Seniors. Text: Mediaeval and Modern History, Meyers. 

D. — Modern History. 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of 
Seniors. Text: Mediaeval and Modern History, Meyers. 

LATIN. 

Each year's work consists of two connected courses which 
together form a unit. 

A. and B. — The Elements of Latin. Oral and written drill 
in declension and conjugation throughout the year; vocabularies 
impressed by the study of English derivations and Latin correl- 
atives; practice in the accurate, smooth, and intelligent reading 
of the Latin; the reading of a considerable amount of easy 
Latin; the study and use of the more common noun and verb 
constructions. 

A. — 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of all Junior students. 

B. — 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of all Junior students. 

C. and D.— Caesar and Latin Composition. Books I-IV or 
their equivalent. Study of the structure of the complex sentence. 
Daily exercises in Latin composition based on the text just read. 
Examples of the various constructions met in the text systematical- 
ly arranged in the students' note-books and made the basis of 
grammatical study. 

C. — 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of all Middle class 
students. 

D. — 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of all Middle Class 
students. 

E. and F. — Cicero's Orations and Latin Composition. Empha- 
sis is placed on the historical and rhetorical significance of the 
speeches. Students are encouraged to interpret by the proper 
oral rendition of the Latin text. Composition and Grammar are 
continued as in the case of Caesar. The speeches regularly read 
are those against Catiline, the one for the Manilian Law and the 
one for Archias. 

E. — 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of all Seniors. 

F. — 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of all Seniors 



76 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



G. and H.— Vergil's Aeneid and Latin Composition. The 

Aeneid is studied primarily as literature. The student is helped 
to understand the poem as related to the Augustan age, to the 
Homeric epic, and to modern literature. The characteristics of 
the Aeneid are so considered as to provide an introduction to 
poetry in general. The rhythmical and at the same time intelli- 
gent reading of the Latin forms an essential part of the work 
throughout. The exercises in Latin composition for the year il- 
lustrate a systematic review of Latin syntax. 

G. — 4 hours, Fall Semester, required of Seniors who intend 
to become candidates for the classical or philosophical degrees 
of Ottawa University. 

H. — 4 hours, Spring Semester, required of Seniors who need 
to take Course G. 



MATHEMATICS. 

A. — Algebra. An introductory course. Four hours, Fall Se- 
mester, Required of all Junior students. 

B. — Algebra. A continuation of course A, extending to the 
theory of exponents. Four hours, Spring Semester. Required of 
all Juniors. 

C. — Algebra. Rapid review; theory of exponents; radicals; 
quadratic equation. Four hours, Fall Semester. Required of all 
Middle Class students. 

D. — Plane Geometry. Exercises based on a text, with special 
emphasis on original problems. Four hours, Spring Semester. Re- 
quired of all Middle Class students. 

E. — Plane Geometry. A continuation of Course D. Four 
hours. Fall Semester. Required of all Seniors. 

F. — Solid Geometry. Four hours, Spring Semester. Required 

of all Seniors. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE. 

k is carried on in the laboratories of the college, and 
every reasonable facility is provided for the mastery of the 
principles presented. 

Physiography. Lectures, recitations, laboratory and field work 
on tl ' physical features of the earth. The courses lay a founda- 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



TT 



tion for later geological study, and call attention to the forces 
now affecting the earth's crust. 

A. — The earth's movement and the solar system; the ero- 
sion and disintegration of the earth's surface by the action of 
water; the formation of soils and the relation of the physical 
features of the earth to the life of man. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of all Juniors. 

B. — The atmosphere, its properties and movements; climata 
and its factors; the distribution of life; the adjustment «f indus- 
trial (pursuits of environment. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of all Juniors. 

Physics. The elementary principles of Physics are presented 
by text, lectures and laboratory experiment. Every effort is 
made to present the fundamental laws which underlie physical 
phenomena, and to introduce the student to the methods of mod- 
ern science. An introductory course. 

A. — The properties of matter, mechanics, and heat. Labora- 
tory work on two days of each week. 

Four hours, Fall Semester, required of the Middle Class. 

B. — Sound, light, electricity, and magnetism. Laboratory 
work on two days of each week. 

Four hours, Spring Semester, required of the Middle Clas?. 

ZOOLOGY. 

A brief survey of the entire animal kingdom with laboratory 
work on typical group forms accompanied by field work This 
course is intended as an introduction to Higher Zoology and pre- 
sents to the student a general view of animal life. 

A. — Invertebrates. Four hours. Fall Semester. Required of 
Scientfiie Seniors. Elective for others. 

B. — Vertebrates. Four hours. Spring Semester. Required of: 
Scientific Seniors. Elective for others. 



78 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



The Normal School. 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

The Normal School of Ottawa University is organized and 
maintained under the conviction that there are few ways in which 
a Christian school can more effectively exert its 'proper influence 
than by training and moulding teachers, w T ho shall carry its mes- 
sage abroad into the rank and file of society. It is felt that the 
new interpretation which is being put upon the term " Education* ' 
is singularly opportune to the ideals for which Ottawa University 
stands, and for that reason a special emphasis is being laid upon 
the work of this school. 

The school is organized under the laws of the state of Kansas. 
The courses offered have received the fullest approval of the 
State Board of Education, and graduates of the school are en- 
titled to all till e advantages which the law provides. Every stu- 
dent who has completed the course offered by this Normal School, 
is entitled, after passing an examination in the so-called profes- 
sional subjects, to a three-year's state certificate, enabling him to 
teach without further examination in any public school, including 
the schools of cities of the first and second class, in Kansas and 
in some other states. If the holder of this three-year certificate 
teaches acceptably during two of the three years during which 
the certificate is in force, he may exchange it for a life-certificate. 

Normal students may at any time during or after their 
graduation register in any of the regular classes of the Academy 
or of the College. Full credit will be given for all standard 
credits earned in the Normal School, and no time is lost by reason 
of courses which are below standard or unacceptable in any cur- 
rent schedule of entrance requirements. 

A Bureau of Recommendations has been organized, which will 
endeavor to assist every graduate of promise in securing a posi- 
tion on the basis of his merit. The bureau will endeavor to enter 
into relations with employers, and to keep a carefully corrected 
and thoroughly accurate lecord of every graduate, with a view to 
placing Ottawa graduates into such positions as they may be 
qualified to hold. 

Normal students are entitled without extra cost to all the 
privileges of the University library and reading room, to member- 
ship in the religious, literary, and social organizations, and to the 
use of the University gymnasium. Regular instruction is offered 
in the gymnasium, and normal students may at will join any of 
the University athletic teams for which they may be qualified. 

Tuition and fees in the Normal are the same as in the College 
and the Academy. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



79 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

The entrance requirements of the Normal School are iden- 
tical with those of the Academy. The candidate will be expect- 
ed to sibow evidence of satisfactory progress in the work cov- 
ered in the grade-schools, and must in addition, in order to secure 
the active co-operation of the school, show himself to be a person 
of genuine ability and of sound character. The University will 
not recommend a student who is defective in either of those 
directions. 

The Normal Course proper covers four years of work. For 
the convenience of a considerable number of students wlho enter 
deficient in one or more of the common branches, a preparatory 
year is maintained. The work included in the course is as fol- 
lows. The letters indicate the numbers of the course, the ara- 
ble numerals indicate the number of recitations per week. 

NORMAL COURSE. 
Preparatory Year. 

Fall Semester. Spring Semester, 

Arithmetic Arithmetic 

Grammar Grammar 

U. S. History Geography 

Spelling Bookkeeping 

Penmanship Commercial Law 

First Year. 

Algebra A, 4 Algebra B, 4 

Latin A, 4 Latin B, 4 

English A, 4 English B, 4 

History A, 4 history B, 4 

Second Year. 

Algebra C, 4 Geometry D, 4 

Latin C, 4 English D, 4 

English C, 4 Latin D, 4 

Physics A, 4 Physics B, 4 

Botany A, 4 Botany B, 4 

Third Year. 

E lish E, 4 English F, 4 

Rhetoric I 5 Chemistry I 5 

Biology I 3 Biology II 3 

Pedagogy I 4 Pedagogy Ill, 5 



so 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Fourth Year. 



Psychology 

Geology 

Political Economy 

Ethics 

Pedagogy 

Elective 



I, 5 Pedagogy 
... 3 Pedagogy 
. . 2 Sociology 



3 Psychology 



... 3 
IV, 5 
..II 5 

.... 3 



V 1 

.. 2 



To students who have completed this course, fciie University 
will issue a Normal diploma, which will entitle the student to 
full credit before the State Board of Education, except that he 
must pass the state examination in the technical subjects. This 
examination is held in May of each year in University Hall, under 
the supervision of this University. 

It will be noticed that the courses named above form an ec- 
lectic group, selected from the usual courses of the high school 
and college. The elective courses indicated must be selected from 
the collegiate courses. The courses fall into four groups: 

1. — The Sub-Academic Courses are those which are offered in 

order to give students an opportunity to make up back work. 

2. — The Academic Courses are those which in the above list 
are marked with capitals. They will be found described in detail 
in connection with the statement of the work of the Academy. 

3. — The Courses Bearing Roman Numerals are selected from 
the regular college course, and represent some of the more im- 
portant elements of that group of courses. Detailed descriptions 
of these courses may be found in connection with the work of 
the College of Liberal Arts. 

4. — The Professional Courses under the title of Pedagogy I 
to V, include the subjects prescribed by the State Law of Kansas. 
A detailed description of these courses will be found in the col- 
legiate section of this catalog, in the group of subjects entitled 
"Philosophy" and "Education." The courses are as follows: 

Pedagogy I, School Methods 

Pedagogy II, School Management 

Pedagogy III, School Law 

Pedagogy IV, Philosophy of Education 

Pedaircc-y y. ..... History o/ Education 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



8L 



The School of Fine Arts. 

Departments. — There are three departments in The School 
of Fine Arts: The Conservatory of Music, The School of Art, 
and The School of Expression. Thorough and systematic instruc- 
tion is offered in each of these departments leading to its appro- 
priate diploma or degree. The Conservatory studios are located 
in the center of the city where they are easily accessible to both 
citizens and students. It is also expected that arrangements will 
be made so that college students may receive instruction in one 
of the college buildings if it is desired. The standard of instruc- 
tion may be expected to be of the highest character. 

The Art studio is located in University Hall. It is a large 
well lighted room equipped with models and other necessary ap- 
paratus for the best work. 

The Department of Expression has its headquarters in Uni- 
versity Hall for the present. During the past years Ottawa Uni- 
versity has taken high rank in this work. It does not propose to 
take any backward step. 

In all of these departments the University expects to furnish 
first elass opportunities to the students and to the public in gen- 
eral. It proposes to meet every reasonable demand. Instruction 
shall be thorough. Good foundations shall be laid for the most 
advanced work in special schools. 

Entrance Requirements. These are given in detail in connec- 
tion with a statement of each course as it is outlined. It is ex- 
pected that in each department the student will show a good de- 
gree of proficiency in the English language and the branches taught 
in the public schools, otherwise it will be impossible to carry on 
the work with any satisfaction to the pupil or credit to the 
University. 

Tuitions, Fees, Etc. The tuition rates in the School of Fine 
Arts depend upon the kind and quantity of work taken. The 
following are the rates in force at the present time. The Univer- 
sity reserves the right to change these rates without notice, though 
no very radical change will be made without due notice. 

The Conservatory of Music. 

Piano, Grades I and II, 20 half-hour lessons, 2 each week. . .$10.00 

Piano, Grade III, 20 half-hour lessons, 2 each week 12.00 

Piano, Grade IV, 20 half-hour lessons, 2 each week 15.00 

Piano, Grades V and VI, 20 half-hour lessons, 2 each week 20.00 

Vocal Training 20 half -hour lessons, 2 each week 20.00 

Public School Singing, 20 half-hour lessons, 2 each week 20.00 



82 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



History, Theory or Harmony, 20 half-hour lessons, 2 each week 10.00 

Chorus Singing Special arrangements 

Violin, 20 half -hour lessons, 2 each week 20.00 

Pipe* Organ, single lessons, half-hour 1.00 

Special arrangements will be made for lessons on Mandolin, 
Guitar, Cello, Reed and Brass Instruments. Special rates will be 
made for one hour lessons when thej' are desired. 

The Art Department. 

Single lessons, one hour $1.00 

18 lessons, once per week during the Semester, 2 hrs each. . . 4.00 
36 lessons, two each week during' the Semester, 3 hours each 10.00 
54 lessons, three each week during the Semester, 3 hours each 13.00 
90 lessons, five each week during the Semester, 3 hours each 22.00 



Pyrography, single lesson 35 

The School of Expression. 

Single lessons, half -hour $ .75 

Single lessons, one hour 1.25 

Two half-hour lessons per week for the Semester 25.00 

One half-hour lesson per week for the Semester 15.00 

One one-hour lesson per week for the Semester 20.00 



Classes will be organized on special terms when a sufficient 
number warrant it. 

Credits. A College credit of not more than six semester hours 
will be given for work done in The School of Fine Arts or in the 
College Orchestra. Not more than two of these credits may be 
for instrumental music. Not more than four of them may be for 
work done in the College Orchestra, as follows, one-half Semester 
hour credit for one semester's work in the orchestra. With the 
above restrictions these credits may be offered in any of the de- 
partments of this school. The purpose of this credit is to encour- 
age the students to take some work in music, especially musical 
theory and history, and Art, especially Free-hand Drawing and 
Expression. These are all topics of vital interest to one who 
desires a broad culture. 

The Conservatory of Music. 

Courses. There are three: the Degree course, the Diploma, 
course and special students. To meet the demands of these classes 
the following outline is planned. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



83 



THE DEGREE COURSE. 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Music. Full fifteen 
units of preparatory work are required for unconditional entrance 
to this course. These units must be taken in the Academy of the 
University or some accredited high school or academy. A student 
will 'be admitted if he does not lack more than three units of 
work, but these units must be made up in the early part of the 
course. These deficiencies can be made up in the Academy. Also 
students will be expected to have completed the preliminary 
courses on the piano. 



Fall Semester 
A Modern Language, 5 hours. 
Rhetoric 1, 5 hours. 
Harmony I, 2 lessons. 
Grade la in the selected 
musical group, 2 lessons. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Spring Semester. 

A Modern Language, 5 hours. 
Harmony II, 2 lessons. 
Grade lb in the selected 
musical group, 2 lessons. 



A Modern Language, 5 
Harmonylll, 2 lessons. 
Grade Ha in the selected 

musical group, 2 lessons 
Theory, 1 lesson. 



SECOND YEAR. 

hours. A Modern Language, 5 hours. 
Harmony IV, 2 lessons. 
Grade lib in the selected 

musical group, 2 lessons. 
Theory, 1 lesson. 



A Modern Language, or 
English Literature, 5 hours. 
Grade Ilia in the musical 

group selected, 2 lessons. 
History of Music, 1 lesson. 
Advanced Harmony, 1 lesson. 

Musical groups leading 1 
piano, pipe organ and violin 
details of each group. 



i YEAR. 

A Modern Language, or 

English Literature, 5 hours. 

Grade Illb in the musical 
group selected, 2 lessons. 

History of Music, 1 lesson. 

Advanced Harmony, 1 lesson, 
the degree are offered in voice, 
See the following pages for the 



THE DIPLOMA COURSE. 

Students from the public schools are admitted to this course. 
Those who have graduated from an accredited high school may 
complete the course in two years by applying themselves closely 
to the work. All who have credits for the literary work in the 
course will be excused from taking those subjects here. 



84 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



FIRST YEAR. 



Fall Semester 

English A, 4 hours. 
History A, 4 hours. 
Harmony I ? 2 lessons. 
Music, Grade la 2 lessons. 



Spring Semester. 

English B, 4 hours. 
History B, 4 hours. 
Harmony II, 2 lessons. 
Music, Grade lb, 2 lessons. 



SECOND YEAR. 



English C, 4 hours. 
Harmony III, 2 lessons. 
Music, Grade Ila, 2 lessons. 
Theory I, 1 lesson. 



English D, 4 hours. 
Harmony IV, 2 lessons. 
Music, Grade lib, 2 lessons. 
Theory II, 1 lesson. 



THIRD YEAR. 



German A, 5 hours. 

Music, Grade Ilia, 2 lessons. 

History of Music, 1 lesson. 

Students in Music will take 
ature instead of Harmony. 



German B, 5 hours. 

Music, Grade IHb, 2 lessons. 

History of Music, 1 lesson. 

in the third year Musical Liter- 



Departments. 

Musical groups leading to degree or diploma are offered in 
Piano, Pipe Organ, Voice and Violin. See the pages following for 
the details of each of these groups. 

PIANO-FORTE. 

The work of the department is divided into two divisions, 
the first being introductory, and the second advanced. Ordinarily 
a student by close application may expect to complete one of 
these divisions in three years, and the courses outlined above are 
based on that fact, but no assurance can be given other than that 
the student will be advanced as rapidly as his progress warrants. 
Some students may need more than three years for each of the 
divisions. 

All students who wish to register as candidates for either 
the degree of Fine Arts in Music or for a musical diploma, will 
be required to complete the introductory work before undertak- 
ing the advanced work; and a satisfactory examination will be 
required before the student is allowed to pass into the advanced 
division. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



85 



A.— THE INTRODUCTORY PIANO GRADES, 

A. — The First Year Grade. Selected studies from Gurlitt, 
Koehler, Czerny, and Loeschhorn; easy compositions by Schmidt, 
Kullak, Lichner, Behr, and others; daily technical work. 

B. — The Second Year Grade. Selections from Lemoine, Op. 
27; Koehler, Op. 50, bk. 2; Duvernoy, Op. 120; Burgemueller, Op. 
100; Doesehhorn, Op. 66; Herrer, Op. 47; Sonatinas, Clementi, 
Kuhlau, etc. Easy Sonatas by Haydn and Mozart. Compositions 
by Srpindler, Schumann, Emery, Kullak, and others; daily tech- 
nical work. 

0.— The Third Year Grade. Selections from Heller, Op. 46; 
Loeschhorn, Op. 66; preludes by Bach. Krause's Trill Studies. 
Velocity Studies by Berens, or Loeschhorn, of Czerny. Sonatas 
by Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. Exercises, Scales and Arpeg- 
gios by Hannan. Compositions by Chopin, Mendelssohn, Schubert, 
Lieging, Foote, and others. 

Students who have satisfactorily completed the introductory 
grades above outlined are entitled, if they desire it, to a certifi- 
cate of proficiency. 

B.— THE ADVANCED PIANO GRADES. 

Note: The courses scheduled below constitute the piano 
group required of all candidates for the degree or diploma in 
music who select the piano as their work. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Ia. — First Half-year. Cramer Studies; Bach, Two and Three 
part inventions; Daily Technique, Czerny and Koehler; 
Compositions by Chopin, Mendelssohn, Paderewski, 
Foote, and others. 

Ib.— Second Half-year. Czerny, Velocity Op. 740; Sonatas by 
Mozart and Beethoven; Daily Technique, Czerny or Koeh- 
ler; Compositions by Schumann; Weber, McDowell, 
Scharwenka, and otihers. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Ha.— First Half-year. Clemente, "Gradus ad Parnassum;" 
Bach, English Suites; Tausig's Daily Technique; Cora- 
positions by Chopin, Schubert, Raff, Mozkowski, and 
others. 



86 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



lib.— Second Half-year. Mayer, Op. 168; Sonatas, Beetho- 
ven, Schubert, Weber; Tausig's Daily Technique; Com- 
positions by Mozart, Schumann, Grieg, Mason and others. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Ilia.— First Half-year. Moscheles, Op. 70; Bach, Well-tem- 
pered Clavichord; Tausig's Daily Technique; Composi- 
tions by Mendelssohn, Rubenstein, Doorak, Saint Saens, 
and others. 

Illb. — Second Half-year. Etudes by Henselt; Chopin, Op. 
10 and 25; Sonatas by Beethoven, Schumann and Chopin; 
Composions by Liszt, Wagner, BraJhms, Weber, and 
others. 

The final public examination, which must be passed by every 
candidate for a degree or diploma will consist of any ten selec- 
tions from the standard works mentioned in the preceding list. 

A musical study and interpretation class for students in the 
advanced grades meets every two weeks. The composers and their 
work are studied in detail. The class is free to students in the 
department, and attendance on the part of all candidates for the 
piano degree or diploma is required. 

PIPE ORGAN. 

The work of the Pipe Organ department will be put into 
thoroughly responsible hands, and will be as carefully organized, 
and as accurately taught as are the other musical subjects. The 
facilities at hand are among the very best in the state of Kansas. 
The courses will be outlined at an early date. 

VOCAL. 

The courses of the vocal department are divided into two 
divisions, preparatory and advanced. Every student who regis- 
ters for the degree or the diploma in vocal music, will be re- 
quired to pass an examination on the courses included in the 
preparatory group. 

The instruction of the department aims at voice develop- 
ment and the impartation of strength and purity to the tone. 
Pupils are prepared for church, oratorio and concert work, as 
well as for teaching. All lessons are given privately. 

A. -THE PREPARATORY GRADES. 

A. — The First Year. Correct breath control; exercises and 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



87 



Solfeggio; ear training'; voice placing'; elementary studies; bal- 
lads. 

B. — The Second Year. Exercises and Solfeggio; breathing 
exercises; voice placing; ear training; Panofka; Concone; ballads. 

C. — The Third Year. Exercises for flexibility and articula- 
tion; voice placing; Concone; Spiker's exercises for vocalization; 
songs by English and American composers. 

Students who have satisfactorily completed the preparatory 
grades in Vocal Music are entitled to a certificate of proficiency 
if tlhey wish it. 

B.— THE ADVANCED GRADES. 

Note: The courses scheduled below constitute the musical 
group required of all who select Vocal Music as their line of 
work. 

THE FIRST YEAR. 

Grade la. — First half. Exercises for flexibility; Marchesi or 
Concone; Italian studies by Vaccai; English and Italian songs. 

Grade lb. — Second half. The authors named in Grade la 
continued, with advanced work and exercises. 

THE SECOND YEAR. 

Grade Ila.— First half. Advanced studies; Concone, Mar- 
chesi, Bordogni; songs by foreign writers. 

Grade lib. — Second half. The work outlined in Grade Ila 
continued and completed. Increasing attention to technical ac- 
complishment. 

THE THIRD YEAR. 

Grade Ilia. — First half. Exercises by Marchesi, Bonaldo, 
Lamperte; public performances, both in solo and choral work. 

Grade lib. — Second half. Spiker; Oratorio; Opera; Bra- 
vura songs. Completion of work from previous half-year. 

Candidates for the degree or diploma in vocal music will be 
required by way of final public examination to sing any one or 
more of the works above mentioned, or such others as may reas- 
onably be prescribed by the musical faculty concerned. 

CHORAL INSTRUCTION. 

All pupils are urged to attend the chorus rehearsals for the 
benefit of the drill and for the opportunity of sight-reading and the 



88 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



knowledge gained of the better grades of music. It is the custom 
for the members of the Conservatory Chorus to give in (public 
during the winter season, at least one oratorio or cantata. No 
charge is made for membership in the chorus. 

SIGHT SINGING. 

There is organized every year a class in sight singing to give 
to those who desire it an opportunity to take up systematic study 
of the principles of music as applied to sight singing. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

In response to a continued demand throughout the country 
for Supervisors of Music in the public schools, the department has 
added a course of instruction in public school music. The best 
systems in use in the public schools of Chicago, New York and 
Boston are taught. This course extends through the school year 
and the tuition is the same as for voice lessons. 

VIOLIN. 

The instruction on the violin is divided in the same manner 
as the work in piano-forte, and everything that was noted 
in the introduction to the work of the piano department 
applies also to the work on the violin. Students enrolling in the 
work of this department are requested to read carefully the in- 
troduction referred to. 

A. THE PREPARATORY GRADES IN VIOLIN. 

This work must be done before the student can register as a 
candidate for either the degree or the diploma in music. 

Violin Methods by Hohmann, Dancla, David, Ries, Sdhrad- 
ieck. Studies by Wohlfahrt, Sitt, Kayser, Dont, Mazas, Scales 
in two octaves. Duos by Mazas, Pleyel, Dancla, etc. Solos by 
Dancla, de Beriot, Sitt, Schumann, Hauser, German, Raff, etc., 
suitable to grade. Ensemble work. Must have at least one year 
on the piano. 

B. THE ADVANCED GRADES IN VIOLIN. 

The courses grouped below constitute the musical group re- 
quired of all candidates for the musical degree or diploma who 
select the violin as their work. 

THE FIRST YEAR. 

Grade la. — The First half-year. Kreutzer. Scales and ar- 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



8!) 



pegigios in three octaves. Concertos by Accolay, Viotti, Rode, 
and de Beriot. 

Grade lb— The Second half-year. Kreutzer. Scales and ar- 
peggios in tlhree octaves. Double stops. Legende by Wieniawski; 
Romances, Beethoven; Russian Airs, David; Elegie, Ernst; An- 
dante, and Scherzo by David. 

THE SECOND YEAR. 

Grade Ha. — The First half-year. Fiorillo. Dancla's school 
of mechanism. Sonatas, Handel A major, Tartini G minor. Con- 
certos, Bazzini, Godard, Spohr, etc. 

Grade lib. — The Second half-year. Rode, Moto perpetuo, 
Paganini. Romanze by Bruch; Fantaisie Militaire, Leonard; 
Fantaisies and Polonaise, Vieuxtemps, Faust Fantaisie by Sar- 
asate. Must be able to play well at sight. 

THE THIRD YEAR. 

Grade Ilia.— The First half-year. Rode; Dont (Gradus ad 
Parnassum). Sonatas by Bach and Nardini. Concertos by Men- 
delssohn, Bruch, Wieniawski. 

Grade Illb. — The Second half-year. Gavinier. Concertos by 
Vieuxtemps, Molique, Spohr. Compositions by Saint Saens, Bee- 
thoven, Sauret, Braihms, Sarasate, etc. Interpretation and musi- 
cal literature. 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR. 

Instruction in mandolin and guitar will be given as it may 
be required, but no set course has been arranged, nor will the work 
so taken be counted either toward a degree or a diploma. 

THE COLLEGE ORCHESTRA. 

The college orchestra furnishes valuable opportunities for 
study, practice, and ensemble playing to students who are work- 
ing on string and reed instruments. Instruction in the orchestra 
is free, although students who join the organization will be ex- 
pected to attend all rehearsals, practices, and chapel services, 
at which the orchestra regularly appears. 

THEORY, HISTORY AND LITERATURE. 

Tthe scientific principles involved, and the mechanism em- 
ployed in the production of music are of such importance that 



90 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



the study of the subjects grouped under this head will commend 
themselves at once to the earnest student of music. 

THEORY OF MUSIC. 

I. — Introductory Theory. The mechanism and rocabulary 

of musical representation; time, rhj'thm, scales, notes, keys. Second 
advanced year, Fall Semester, twice weekly. 

II. — Advanced Theory. Acoustics, the laws of tone produc- 
tion, tone color, instrumentation. Second advanced year, Spring 
Semester, twice weekly. 

Both courses are required of candidates for the musical di- 
ploma and degree. 

THE HISTORY OF MUSIC. 

I. a and b.— The History of Music from 1600 B. C, to the 

present time. Biographies, instrument study, essays. Third 

advanced year, throughout the year, twice weekly. Both a and 
b are required of all musical graduates. 

MUSICAL LITERATURE. 

I. a and b.— The Literature of Music. Biographies, essays, 
current criticisms, the discussion of present day musical events 
and publications. Library work. Third advanced year, through- 
out the year, once weekly, required of all vocal musical grad- 
uates, in place of advanced harmony. 

HARMONY AND COUNTERPOINT. 

The courses of this department are intended entirely for the 
advanced grades. The work will be characterized by thorough- 
ness and care, and no student will be allowed to graduate until 
a minimum prescribed amount of this work has been done. 

I. — Elementary Harmony. Harmony up to and including the 

Secondary 7th chords. First advanced year, Fall Semester, 
twice weekly. 

II. — Elementary Harmony Continued. Harmony to and in- 
cluding suspensions. First advanced year, Spring Semester, twice 
weekly. 

m. —Harmonizing Melodic Subject in Soprano. Analyzing; 

harmony, including figured chorale. Second advanced year, Fall 

Semester, twice weekly. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



91 



IV. — Harmonizing Melodies. Different parts; analyzing; 
single counterpoint. Second advanced year, Spring Semester, 
twice weekly. 

V. — Advanced Harmony. Counterpoint and musical form. 
Analysis of form from the great masters. Third advanced year, 
Fall Semester, once weekly. 

VI. — Advanced Harmony Continued. Regular rhythm, ir- 
regular rhythm, the various forms of musical composition studied 
in detail and by examples. Third advanced year, Spring Semes- 
ter, once weekly. 

Courses I to IV in Harmony are required of all candidates 
for the musical diploma or degree. Courses V and VI in Har- 
mony are required of candidates for the musical degree or di- 
ploma in the piano department. 



The School of Art. 

The courses of this department are arranged as follows: 
I. — FREE-HAND DRAWING. 
FIRST YEAR. 

Drawing in charcoal from still life and east. It aims to 
teach the student to construct form in a simple manner with ac- 
curacy and fidelity to detail with attention given to light and 
shade. It emphasizes the principles of elementary perspective. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Drawing in charcoal and crayon from cast, nature and life. 
A study of tike composition of pictures. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Drawing in charcoal, pen and ink and brush from still life 
and nature. Cast drawing continued from the full length figure. 
Drawing from life. 

II. — PAINTING. 

Students with a sufficient knowledge of drawing may take up 
the study of water color, oil and pastel. This work is done from 
fruits, flowers, landscape, life and copy. 



92 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Thorough study is given to composition, color values, light and 
shade. 

Attention is given to practical and applied design. 

Teachers' Course in Art. The aim of this course is to develop 

the powers of observation and accuracy. Also it is intended to 
prepare teachers to give art instruction in the public schools. The 
work includes Free-hand drawing in charcoal and pencil from still 
life, casts and living models, free-hand perspective and water 
color rendering. 

All those who are expecting to teach in the public or high 
schools are advised to take this course. 

An art reception will be given on Tuesday afternoon of 
commencement week at which time the work done in this depart- 
ment during the year will be on exhibition. 



The School of Expression. 

The purpose of this school is to be thoroughly educational 
and to develop strong natural readers and thinkers. The method 
of teaching is based upon psychological principles and will assist 
the student in the interpretation of literature, the development 
and control of the emotional nature and the cultivation of the 
imagination. 

The Diploma in Elocution is granted to those Who present 
fifteen preparatory units of work as described in the early part 
of this catalog and complete the following course. 

The usual time for completing this co'urse is two years. The 
work is all private. Bach student is studied and such work given 
him as will bring out (his powers with best effect. 

BODILY EXPRESSION, GESTURE. 
Course I. — Training for Physical Response. Exercises for 
stimulating nerve centers. Study of the different agents of bodily 
expression. Function of eaci. 

Course II.— Harmony of Action. Exercises for overcoming 
mannerisms. Exercises for the development of descriptive action. 
Study and analysis of bodily expression in others. 

VOICE WORK. 

Much time is devoted to tfhe cultivation of the voice. It is 
the aim to bring out its strength and beauty, to improve good 
voices and make poor voices good. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



93 



Coarse I. — Tone Production. The Shaksperean method of 
breathing is used. 

Course II.— Cultivation of Resonance. Tone color. Ear 
training. Response of voice to emotion. Slides. Increase of range. 

Course III.— Formation. Study of English sounds. Accuracy 
of utterance. 
-* 

VOCAL LANGUAGE. 

Course I.— Vocal statement contrasted with vocal language. 
Extensive practice in the use of tone color. 

Course II. — Phrasing. Grouping of phrases and clauses. Men- 
tal action in phrase grouping and its vocal expression. Function 
of tone color. 

DEVELOPMENT OF EXPRESSION. 

Course I. — Fundamental principles of expression. Cultivation 
of the imagination. Picturing. 

Course II. — Freedom of Expression. Language of emotion. 
Studies for directness. 

Course III.— Unity of expression. Relation of reader to audi- 
ence. Development of momentum. 

Course IV.— Suggestiveness. Subtlety. Studies in fulfill- 
ment of author's purpose. 

[Text: Four volumes of Psychological Development of Ex- 
pression by Mary A. Blood and Ida Morey Riley, founders of the 
Columbia School of Oratory, Chicago.] 

LITERARY INTERPRETATION. 

Course I.— Study and practice on rendition of different forms 
of literature including the short story, monologue, poetry and dra- 
matic composition. 

Course II.— The course includes a study of a limited number 
of poems of Tennyson, Kipling and Browning. 

DRAMATIC ART. 

Course I.— Life Study. Study of characters from life. Physi- 
cal representation of same. 



04 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Course II— Personation. Study of characters from fiction. 

Dramatic scenes. Stage deportment. 

Course III. — Analysis of selected plays from Shakspere for 

dramatic elements and character delineation. 



ORATORY. 

It is the aim of this department to help its speakers to be 
simple and natural and when occasion requires, powerful. 

After the student has had general preparation he is required 
to study as many of the great orations as the time will permit. 

All pupils with a High School education or its equivalent, 
who have taken the two years' course of two private and one 
class lesson each week will he given a diploma. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

Get health. No labor, pains nor exercise that can gain it must be grudged.— R W. 
Emerson. 

Is not that the best education which gives to the mind and to the boda all the force, 
all the beauty and all the perfection of which they are capable?— Plato. 

The first aim of the department is to give to students such 
exercises and games as will create and maintain a vigorous physi- 
cal health. It is also the work of the department to ennoble the 
presence, improve the bearing and produce grace, ease and light- 
ness of movement. 

Two hours per week throughout the year are required of all 
young women students. 

FIRST YEAR. 

General Introductory Course. Physical development and free- 
dom. Special exercises aimed at complete plasticity of the body, 
and the establishment of health. Relaxation. Control. Emerson 
Exercises, Swedish Exercises, Light apparatus work, Gymnastic 
games. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Advanced work in Emerson Exercises. Rhythmic movements. 
Five positions for the feet. Six radical motions. Arm movements. 
Fancy steps and marches. Wands, dumb bells and clubs. Gym- 
nastic games. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 95 
THIRD YEAR. 

Advanced work in Gymnastics. Advanced Rhythmic work with 
special exercises. 

Each young woman is asked to provide herself with a gym- 
nasium suit. 

Tennis courts are at the disposal of the students during the 
fall and spring. 

There are class basket ball teams and from these class teams 
are chosen the first and substitute teams. 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Business College. 

INTRODUCTORY. 

The Business College is the answer of Ottawa University to 
a widespread demand for a group of courses which shall 
rapidly and effectively prepare young men and women of lim- 
ited means and time, for a business career. The courses of the 
school are planned with the greatest care, and the instruction 
provided is of the highest grade. The University proposes to 
maintain increasingly in this school the same high standard of 
scholarship which it maintains in its other schools. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

Students entering tibe Business College will he expected to 
have covered well the work of the common schools, and give 
assurance of good character and conduct. No student will he re- 
ceived whose conduct or class-room work is not thoroughly satis- 
factory 7 and no student will be received from the other schools if 
this or other Universities, who cannot show satisfactory clearance 
papers from tftie school last attended, if so requested. 

PRIVILEGES. 

All students of the Business College are entitled without 
extra charge to the advantages of the University library and read- 
ing room, to participation in its athletic activities (subject to 
the rules on page 24), to membership in the literary, religious, 
and musical organizations, and to the use of the gymnasium. 
They may also, without extra charge, elect work in the Academy, 
thus enriching the courses, except that not more than twenty- 
five hours of weekly recitations may be taken in any one semester. 

THE COURSES. 

Graduates of the school will be awarded a diploma, and will 
be granted within tfhe limits of their accomplishments, all the ad- 
vantages of the bureau of recommendations. For some time the 
demand for high-class stenographers, and book-keepers has exceed- 
ed the supply, and the authorities of the school will undertake to 
recommend every graduate who has shown himself able to do his 
work with credit, to a position. Students desiring the very highest 
positions, must expect to add to the work of the Commercial courses 
a liberal training in English, History and Mathematics, such as may 
be elected in the Academy. Students of ability and promise are 
urged to combine their commercial work with elective work from 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



97 



the Academy, and to spend two years in preparing. Special credit 
and recommendation will be given for work so done. 

The courses of the Business College are three in number, 
and the length of time required to complete any one of them 
may (be expected to be one semester of nineteen weeks. Some 
students require more time, 'but no student will be held back 'be- 
cause of others. All students are urged for the sake of better 
preparation, to combine their course with electives from the Acad- 
emy as above suggested. Students may enter at any time, and will 
receive their certificates of proficiency when the course selected 
has been completed. For the benefit of students who desire to 
carry on summer work, a summer term of ten weeks beginning on 
the Tuesday preceding Commencement day is conducted. The 
three courses are the Stenographic, the Commercial, and the Tele- 
graphic. They are described in detail below. 

TUITION AND FEES. 

The tuition required of students in the Business College i& 
twenty-two dollars per semester, payable in advance. Students 
entering after the opening of the semester may pay at the rate of 
$1.50 per week for the remainder of the semester if desired or for 
such time as they may wislh to remain, but the entire fee is due 
in advance, and may be extended only as a personal concession. 

Students intending to enter any athletic or other public 
contest held under the auspices of the University by any of its 
student organizations are requested to consult the athletic rule 
on page 24 of this catalog. Such students will pay in advance the 
full tuition of the semester in which they enter, or if they enter 
late they will pay in advance for the rest of the current semester; 
at the rate of $1.50 per unexpired week. 

The cost of tuition for the Su'mmer Term is ten dollars. A. 
fee of $4.00 per semester is collected as typewriter rental of all 
students who take work in typewriting. The school furnishes all 
machines and undertakes their care. The typewriter fee for the- 
Summer Term of ten weeks is two dollars. 

THE GROUPS OF COURSES. 
Fall Semester Spring Semester. Summer Term 

I. — The Regular Commercial Course. 

Bookkeeping. Bookkeeping. Bookkeeping. 

Commercial Law. Commercial Law. Commercial Law. 

Penmanship. Penmanship. Penmanship. 

Spelling. Spelling. Spelling. 

Commercial Arifch. ( -online rcial Arith. Commercial Arifch. 

Business Grammar. Business Grammar. Business Grammar. 



.98 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



II.— The Regular Stenographic Course. 



Shorthand. 
Typewriting. 

Penmanship. 
Spelling. 
Bookkeeping. 
Business Grammar. 



Shorthand. 

Typewriting. 

Penmanship. 

Spelling. 

Bookkeeping. 

Business Grammar. 



Shorthand. 

Typewriting. 

Penmanship. 

Spelling. 

Bookkeeping. 

Business Grammar. 



III. — The Regular Telegraphic Course. 



Telegraphy. 
Typewriting. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 

Commercial Arith. 
Bookkeeping. 



Telegraphy. 
Typewriting. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 

Commercial Arith. 
Bookkeeping. 



Telegraphy. 
Typewriting. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 

Commercial Arith. 
Bookkeeping. 



It is suggested that wherever possible the following arrange- 
ment of courses be made and that the work be extended to the 
completion of the combined course and in such event a special 
Master Accounts diploma will be granted to the student completing 

the combined course. 



IV.— The Combined Course. 



Leading to the 

"ifajl Semester. 
First Year. 

Elementary Composition. 
Algebra A. 
.History A. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling.^ 
Bookkeeping I. 

Second Year. 

Shorthand I. 
typewriting I. 
Penmanship. 
Spelling. 
Oerman A. 
En-rljsh Literature. 



degree of Master of Accounts. 

Spring Semester. 
First Year. 

Elementary Rhetoric. 
Algebra B. 
History B. 
Commercial Law. 
Commercial Arithmetic. 
Bookkeeping II. 

Second Year. 

Shorthand II. 
Typewriting It. 
Telegraphy. 
History D. 
German B. 
American Literature. 



A DESCRIPTION OF THE COURSES IN DETAIL. 
A. The Commercial Course. 

The courses included under this title are planned to impart 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



99 



to the student a knowledge of the science of accounts, to drill 
him carefully in the preparation of business papers, to impart 
a thorough drill in business arithmetic, and to give such experi- 
ence in actual business transactions as will best qualify ihim for a 
practical business life. The course in commercial law is included 
because it is invaluable in business life. Particular attention is 
given to the principles which are most essential to business men. 

I. Bookkeeping.— Musselman's Complete Theory of Accounts; 
Single Entry; Complete Account Book; Journalizing; Closing tho 
Ledger with Balance Sheets; Partner Admitted; Columnar Jour- 
nal; Wholesale; Manufacturing; Real Estate; Corporations; Com- 
mission; Banking; Lumbering. 

II. Actual Business.— Capital in College Currency furnished 
by the Principal; Manuscript; Merchant's Emporium and Post- 
office; Railroad and Shipping Office; Stock Exchange; Real Estate 
and Insurance; Wholesale House; Commission House; Banking. 

III. Commercial Law. — McKenna; Analysis of Contracts, 
with written forms; Negotiable Paper; Currency; Partnership; 
Corporation; Guaranty; Sale of Chattels; Stoppage in Transit; 
Payment and Tender; Liens; Interest and Usury; Affreightment; 
Bailment; Insurance; Arbitration; Distribution of Estates of 
Deceased Persons; Real Estate Conveyances. 

IV. Business Arithmetic. — McKenna 's Short Forms in Ad- 
dition; Multiplication; Division; Denominate Numbers; Per- 
centage; Interest; Discount; Equation of Payments; Alligation; 
Exchange; Partnership; Commission; Annuities; Taxes; Stocks; 
Building and Loan Associations. 

V. Penmanship. — Palmer's Guide to Business Writing; 
Classification and Analysis of Letters and Figures, and their com- 
bination into exercises; Movement Exercises continued; Business 
Letter Writing; Folding Papers and Addressing Envelopes; Rapid 
Business Writing. 

B.— The Stenographic Course. 

The very rapid increase in the demand for expert stenog- 
raphers and typewriter operators has been indeed remarkable. 
The course outlined proposes to enable the student to undertake 
ordinary work as reporter or secretary. For the latter positions 
the student is advised by all means to secure the highest educa- 
tional advantages within reach in addition to the course here 
outlined. 

The systems of shorthand used are the Gregg and the Graham, 



100 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



and students are required before graduation to accomplish a 
speed of one hundred and twenty-five words per minute. The 
time required to accomplish this depends on the ability and dili- 
gence of the student. 

The Smith-Premier and the Remington typewriters are in 
use. The student will be expected to write at an average speed 
of not less than forty words per minute before graduation. Stu- * 
dents may advance as rapidly as they wish, and will not be re- 
quired to wait for slow or dilatory pupils. 

Especial attention is given to teaching the principles of 
business correspondence, manifolding abstracting, court and news- 
paper reporting, etc., so that the student who completes the course 
need not fear to undertake any of the many positions that are 
open for the stenographer. 

I. Corresponding Style.— Gregg's Manual, or Graham's Hand- 
book. Phonetics, Principles, and Word-building; Exercises; Read- 
ing First and Second Phonographic Readers, and U. C. S. Series. 

II. Reporting Style.— Principles of Abbreviation; Phrasing; 
Logograms; Exercises; Reading "The Greatest Thing in the 
World," and other selections in Reporting Style. 

III. Typewriting.— Special attention is given to the "Touch 
System" of Typewriting; Mechanism and Machines; Principles; 
Fingering; correcting Errors; Copying; Manifolding. Students 
are expected to operate either the Smith Premier or the Remington 
machine with speed and accuracy before graduation. 

C. — The Telegraphic Course. 

The training given in this course, in the initiatory, interme- 
diate and finishing departments, is systematic, and complete, em- 
bracing everything essential to a practical knowledge of telegraphy 
and station agent's work. The following is an outline of the 
course : 

Battery, its care and management; relation of circuits and 
instruments; line of main circuit; putting up lines, adjustment of 
instruments; standard train orders; train signals; classification 
of trains, train dispatches ; rules governing the movement of trains 
by telegraph orders; classifying; billing; and proper reporting of 
freight. 

No person will be graduated from this course till he can 
receive thirty words per minute accurately, spell well, write a 
legible, rapid hand and pass a satisfactory examination in the 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



101 



other branches required in the course. One Semester is the 
length of time given to complete all branc'bes mentioned in this 
course. 

The branches not described in detail here may be found de- 
scribed in connection with the two courses above. 



102 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Section V. — The Catalog of 
Students. 

This catalog is issued in April of each year. It contains the 
names of students who have been in actual residence at the 
University during the school year of 1906-7. It will 'be noted that 
those of our graduates who are doing postgraduate work else- 
where are not included in this list of students. 

Note.— The usual abbreviations are used in this roll— "CI" 
standing for Classical Course, "Ph" for Philosophical Course, 
"Sc" for Scientific Course. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



10£ 



The College 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Bureau, Ernest Adolph, Ph. B Ashland, Wis, 

SENIOR CLASS OF 1907. 

Bird, Ina Grace, Sc Ottawa 

Brown, Lulu Marie, CI Ottawa 

Constant, Nita Belle, CI ..Ottawa 

Grass, Dora Ellen, Sc LaCrosse 

Holt, Geo. Herbert, CI Stillwater, Okla. 

Lawrence, Eldred Brown, Ph Ottawa 

Maupin, Hattie Belle, CI Ottawa 

McCoy, Anna Gevene, Sc Ottawa 

McCune, Frank Elton, CI Ottawa 

Mitchell, Cynthia Veda, Ph Eureka 

Parrish, Augusta Crete, Ph Ottawa 

Shinn, Laura Tabitha, Ph Ottawa 

South wick, Rodney Eric, Ph Wichita. 

Speaks, Edgarda Lee, CI Seotts Bluff, Neb, 

Sutherland, Anna Grace, Ph Ottawa 

VanCleve, Hattie Priscilla, Ph Ottawa 

JUNIOR CLASS OF 1908. 

Barker, Joe Lowery, CI Altamont 

Beatty, Jos. Harold, Sc Ottawa 

Daily, Pearl Crozier, Ph Ottawa 

Ellis, Phoebe Merchant, Ph Ottawa 

Fear, Ada Mabel, Ph Waverly 

Floyd, Louis, CI Sedan 

Frink, Bessie, Ph Fairview 

Froning, Margaret Elizabeth, Ph Frederic 

Hardy, Cleo Clinton, CI Ottawa 

Hart, Lois May, CI Ottawa^ 

Hutchinson, Eva Jeanne, Ph Ottawa 

Lebow, Charles Frank, CI Ottawa. 

Lynch, Olive Edna, CI Ottawa 

McDonald, Wm. H., Sc MeLouth 

McNutt, Wm. Roy, CI Blue Mound 

Osgood, Mary Ellen, Ph Sterling, Neb. 

Pugh, Earl Cadwell, CI Ottawa 

Simpson, Ruth, CI Emporia 

Slater, Gertrude D., Ph Ottawa 

Thomas, Mattie Julia, CI Ottawa 



104 THE ANNUAL CATALOG 

Turner, Minnie E., CI Colby 

Williams, Henry Mills, Sc Ottawa 

"Williams, Paul, CI Ottawa 

SOPHOMORE CLASS OF 1909. 

Bell, Alice Kingsley, CI Ottawa 

Cook, Estelle Marsh, Ph Ottawa 

Cowan, Nina May, CI Ottawa 

Dale, Henry Clay, CI Galena 

Ebaugh, Pearl May, €1 McPherson 

Ferris, Leslie A., Ph Yates Center 

Froning, Henry August, Ph Frederic 

Grmnbiing, Emma Jessie, Sc Newton 

Heritage, Ray, CI Gridley 

Jones, J. Wilbur, CI Louis'burg 

Kinnian, Nellie Florence, Ph Clay Center 

Lawrence, Emilie Gertrude, CI Ottawa 

Martin, Albert Henry, CI Galena 

Mieir, Vinton Herman, Sc Ottawa 

Parrish, Harry Bernard, Pre-Eng Ottawa 

Ringer, Vera, Sc Ottawa 

Eishel, Hubert Middlekauff, Sc Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Rock, Jeunie, CI Ottawa 

Shoemaker, Edna Rose, Sc Topeka 

Stallard, Simeon Harvey, Ph Onaga 

Stallard, Mary Hannah, CI Onaga 

Stephenson, Edith Corrinne, CI Olathe 

Stewart, Glennville Edward, Pre-Eng Ottawa 

Sunderlin, Myrtle Viola, CI Ottawa 

Weedman, Walter Franklin, CI Ottawa 

Wilson, John Alexander, Sc Ottawa 

tae, Robert John, CI Long Island 

FRESHMAN CLASS OF 1910. 

Abbott, Alice M., CI Wellington 

Balyeat, Orah May, Ph Ottawa 

Barker, Blanche Lucille, CI Ottawa 

Brown, Glenn 0., Pre-Eng Newton 

Burk, Leone, Ph Kansas City 

Carpenter, Carlos Clay, Pre-Eng Ottawa 

Cole, David, CI Girard 

Crain, Clara Iola, CI., Ottawa 

Dietrich, Elsie Mabel, CI Ottawa 

FiLson, Eva, Ph Ottawa 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 145 

Filson, Sue Alletta, Ph Ottawa 

Geiger, Addie, Sc Ottawa 

Halloren, Arthur, Sc Ottawa 

Haynes, Lily Maude, Ph Ottawa 

Heath, Berniee May, Sc Ottawa 

Hughes, Bradley B., Sc Howard 

Hume, Marion C, Sc Clearwater 

Hutchins, Agassiz Traver, Pre-Eng Ottawa 

Krouse, Ada May, Sc Onaga 

Lee, Hugh, Sc Louisburg 

McCandless, Mabel, Ph Ottawa 

Monroe, Morton Glenn, Pre-Eng Fairview 

Montague, Altha, Ph Hiawatha 

Moore, Merle Melville, Sc Ottawa 

Nash, Robert E., Sc Ottawa 

Osgood, Margaret Krum, CI Sterling, Neb. 

Patrick, Leslie Raymond, Sc Agrioola 

Patten, Fern Lillian, CI Richmond 

Price, Clair Sandon, CI Ottawa 

Price, Frank Judson, CI Atwood 

Rokes, James LeRoy, Ph Onaga 

Shank, Ernest Fred, CI Washington 

Shields, J. W., Ph Holton 

Sifferd, Lillian Henkle, Ph Ottawa 

Simonsen, Emma Helen, CI Lebanon, Neb. 

Stewart, Jessie Prudence, Ph Ottawa 

Wallace, Anna Mary, Ph Hamilton, III. 

Wallace, M. Edna, Sc Stafford 

Woods, Cora Edna, CI Ottawa 

COLLEGE ELECTIVES. 

Bird, Ross Ottawa 

Buchmann, Arnold Cecil Clay Center 

Cassidy, Lorena Eleanor Wichita 

CasthoLm, Milo Harper 

Chaney, Agnes Amanda Newell, la, 

Eley, Blanche Isabelle Oketo 

Filson, Mollie M Ottawa 

Haggart, Mrs. Jennie Ottawa 

King, May Erma Ottawa 

Masters, Ira Harwood Newton 

Mitchum, Martin Millard Ottawa 

Price, Julia Inez Atwood 

Scriven, Cecil Verna Lucas 

Shaw, Robert Whiteman Ottawa 



106 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Shomber, Cecilia Ottawa 

Shoufler, Edward Everett Jewell City 

Stallard, Glea Onaga 

Torrence, Bina B., Lucas 

Turner, Nellie Gertrude Colby 

Ward, Agnes Gertrude Ottawa 

Whiteman, Percy Lee * Sedgwick 

Wilson, Delia Grace Mound Valley 

Woodburn, Frank Snyder Ottawa 

Yager, Mae H Ottawa 



The Academy 

SENIOR CLASS OF 1907. 



Anthony, Lynne, Ph Wellsville 

Bolinger, John W. Ph Bogue 

Bolinger, Hugh J. Sc Bogue 

Chappell, Wm. Madison, Sc Ottawa 

Coen, Mary Lydia, Ph Ottawa 

George, Harry Vergil, Sc Ottawa 

Hammond, Herbert J., Ph Clayton, N. Mex. 

Haynes, Eugene Leslie, Sc Ottawa 

Jennings, Isaac Franklin, CI Bronson 

Keene, Olive Amy, Ph Ottawa 

Lovett, John Lamb, CI Wellsville 

Okeson, Bertha E., Sc Fairview 

Okeson, Geo. B. Sc Fairview 

Staley, Vern Edwin, CI Ottawa 

Veeh, Martha Elizabeth, Sc Phillipsburg 

Weedman, Bessie Almeda, CI , Ottawa 

Wolf, Max Abbott, Sc Ottawa 

Wood, Wm. Hiram Dusten, 'Sc Ottawa 



MIDDLE ACADEMIC CLASS OF 1908. 



Bower, Ross Wm Ottawa 

Bushnell, Jennie Pomona 

Christie, Viola Cedarvale 

Daniel, Grace M Ottawa 

Dudgeon, Floyd Richard Earleton 

Enes, Matilda Merle Jaqua 

Frink, Spencer Fairview 

Garaett, Mary Kathryn Latham 

Johnson, Irene Ottawa 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 107 

Kimbell, Lola Inez Ottawa 

Martin, Elmer H Blue Mound 

Martin. Chas. Henry Princeton 

Monroe, Ethel Irene Fairview 

Parker, Angie Gilbert Ottawa 

Parker, Ernest Robt Ottawa 

Pottorf, Daniel Paris, Ark. 

Price, Hattie May Ottawa 

Riggs, Joseph A Texico, 111. 

Thayer, Flora Alice Ottawa 

Whitson, Cordelia Clare Mound City 



JUNIOR ACADEMIC CLASS OF 1909. 



Anderson, Bertha Annette Ottawa 

Anthony, Lena Belle Weilsville 

Baker, Benj. Ray Overbrook 

Ballard, Wm. Herschel Englewood 

Black, lima Eva Elgin 

Bush, Mary Belle Marvin 

Donahue, Don Carlos Lafontaine 

Elder, Jesse Edwin Pomona 

Elliott, Maude Princeton 

Ferris, Gordon Floyd Yates Center 

Hagstrom, Arthur Oscar , Vilas 

Hagstrom, Anna Vilas 

Harper, Cecil Vivian Brownell 

Harper, Troy Emerson Brownell 

Heckenlively, Orville Ortin Dighton 

Holroyd, Oscar Stephen He wins 

Holroyd, Wm. Frederick Gedarvale. 

Hoy, Ora Maude Long Island 

Johnson, Ferry Cedric Ottawa 

Jones, Chas. Elmer Chanute 

Kroesch, Albert Lorraine 

Logan, Effie May Hoisington 

Meeker, Wm. Bentley Meeker ; Okla. 

Parker, Iva Lena Paola 

Render, John Seott €ity 

R/ush, Chas. Hiram Cedarvale 

Scoville, Nellie Minnie Pomona 

Skoriberg, [Robt. Carl Osage City 

Sloan, Allen Abel Stilwell 

Tedrow, Minnie Elsie Ottawa 

Warrington, Alvin Thos Ottawa 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Wightman, Alma Ottawa 

Wilkinson, Earl Asherville 

ACADEMIC ELECTIVES 

Alien, Ralph Merriman Jackson, Mich. 

Bell, Maude Ottawa 

Elliott, Chas. L Princeton 

Green, Beulah Warren Hoinewood 

Hay, Cressy Jane Sedan 

Heritage, Ruth Gridley 

Keeteh, Grant James Edward Drexel, Mo. 

Morrison, Mabel Elizabeth Phillipsburg 

Nelson, Oscar Emanuel Ottawa 

Nelson, Wm. Gustaf Ottawa 

Parker, Pearl Paola 

Shultz, Edith Adeline, Ottawa 

South, Glenn Weaver Hamilton 

Stang, Emma Marie Bison 

Stanard, Etta Alice Ottawa 

Strntton, Marion Ottawa 

Tate, Ruth Arkansas City 

Weectaaan, Victor Eugene Ottawa 



The Normal School 

CANDIDATES FOR THE TEACHER'S DIPLOMA, AND FOR 
THE STATE TEACHER'S CERTIFICATE. 

Bird, Grace Mitchell, Cynthia 

Brown, Lulu Parrish, Augusta 

Constant, Nita Speaks, Edgarda 

Lawrence, Eldred Sutherland, Grace 

McCoy, Anna VanCleve, Hattie 
Maunln, Hattie 



The School of Fine Arts 

PIANO. 

Alexander, Pearl Ottawa 

Anderson, Bertha Ottawa 

Angel}, Mrs. E. M Ottawa 

Ba;yeat, Slater Ottawa 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 100 

Balyeat, lone Ottawa 

Bavnes, Madaline Ottawa 

Bass, Ruth Ottawa 

Baugkman ; I. W Ottawa 

Beach, Olara Melvern 

Bird, Charity Ottawa 

Black, Erma Elgin 

Blaine, Lena Mary Ottawa 

Broderson, Clara Ottawa 

Brown, Viola May Latham 

Brown, Orville Ray Latham 

Buckley, Clyde, Ottawa 

Carpenter, Pansy Ottawa 

Chaney, Agnes Newell, la. 

Clark, Merle Ottawa 

Clark, Florence ; Ottawa 

Clark, Zoe Ottawa 

Claypool, Phyllis Ottawa 

Confare, Lessie Ottawa 

Cook, Katherine Ottawa 

Cowan, Hazel Ottawa 

Curl, Faith Mildred Ottawa 

Daily, Pearl C Ottawa 

Daniel, Grace Ottawa 

Davenport, Eleanor . Ottawa 

Davis, Mrs. Josaphyne Ottawa 

Dills, Kenneth Ottawa 

Drake, Dorris M Ottawa 

Dunlap, Gertrude Ottawa 

Dunsmore, Mrs Ottawa 

Elder, Dee Ottawa 

Ellis, Phoebe M Ottawa • 

Ellis, Clara L Iola 

Esterly, Louise Ottawa 

Ferguson, Robert H LeLoup 

Filson, Mollie M Ottawa 

Gladman, Josephine . . . s Ottawa 

Gossett, Mrs. E. B Ottawa 

Griffith, Callie A Ottawa 

Grossman, Lillian Ottawa 

Hardeson, Helen Ottawa 

Harris, Gertrude Ottawa 

Haynes, Lillian Ottawa 

Howard, May Ottawa 

Hoy, Ora Maude Long Island 

Hubbard, Ethel Ottawa 



110 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Hughes. Linnie M , Ottawa 

Hutchinson, Eva J Ottawa 

Jenks, Gertrude Howard 

Jewell, Mrs. Edith Princeton 

Johnson, Irene Ottawa 

Kessing, Margaret Ottawa 

King, May Ottawa 

King, Harry Ottawa 

Kittle, Helen Ottawa 

Lamb, Mrs. C. F Ottawa 

Lamb, Ralph F Ottawa 

Leeper, Florence Ottawa 

Lindquist, Mary Ottawa 

McAdow, Ida B Ottawa 

McGuire, Zada Ottawa 

Maddox, Priscilla Ottawa 

Moise, Roena Ottawa 

Morgan, Miriam Ottawa 

Morgan, Alva Ottawa 

Morrison, Mabel Phillipsburg 

Xadler, Carrie LaHarpe 

Parker, Pearl Paola 

Peckenpaugh, Pearl Ottawa 

Peckenpaugh, Everett Ottawa 

Porter, Mrs. Cary Ottawa 

Porter, Charles K Ottawa 

Pric£, Julia I Atwood 

Rock, Jennie Ottawa 

Salee, Gorgia Ottawa 

Saunders, Gordon Ottawa 

Shaffer, Jessie P Ottawa 

Shaw, Leof M Williamsburg 

Shiras, Katherine Ottawa 

Shockey, Bertha Ottawa 

Shomber, Cecilia Ottawa 

Siemantel, Margaret Ottawa 

Smith, Perie Ottawa 

Spencer, Winifred Ottawa 

Spencer, Gladys Ottawa 

Springston, Avis Ottawa 

Stang, Emma Bison 

Stannard, Pearl Ottawa 

Stephenson, Nellie Westphalia 

Stickley, Frankie Helen Ottawa 

Stucker, Mertis Ottawa 

Torrencc. Bina B Lucas 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. Ill 

Turner, Nellie Colby 

Underwood, Mrs. Laura Ottawa 

Wallace, Madge Ottawa 

Warrington, Clara Ottawa 

Whetstone, Marian G Pomona 

Wood, Roberta Ottawa 

Wyble, Bessie Ottawa 

Yates, Anna Ottawa 

Young, Laura Ottawa 

VOICE. 

Alwes, Katherine Ottawa 

Beach, Clara A Melvern 

Bird, Grace Ottawa 

Bird, Charity Ottawa 

Bower, Ross Ottawa 

Branson, Helen C Ottawa 

Brown, Viola Latham 

Caldwell, Mamie Homewood 

Ferguson, Robt. H LeLoup 

Gilliland, Wayne Ottawa 

Howell, Amy B Ottawa 

Hughes, Bradley L Howard 

Jenness, Mrs. J. F Ottawa 

King, May Ottawa 

King, Harry Ottawa 

Lawrence, Emilie Ottawa 

Lawrence, Ruth Ottawa 

Martin, Faith C Ottawa 

Martin, A. H Galena 

Montague, Altha E Hiawatha 

Okerberg, Martha Ottawa 

Osborne, R. L Ottawa 

Porter, C. M Ottawa 

Shade, Grace Ottawa 

Shockey, Bertha E Ottawa 

Spencer, Winifred Ottawa 

Stang, Emma M Bison 

Whiteman, Percy L Sedgwick 

Wi'ble, Bessie B Ottawa 

HARMONY— THEORY — MUSICAL HISTORY. 

Biown, Viola Latham 

Confare, Lessie Ottawa 



112 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Chaney. Agues Newell, la. 

Ellis. Clara Iola 

Filson, Moliie M Ottawa 

Haynes. Lillian Ottawa 

Hutchiuson. Eva J Ottawa 

Jenks. Gertrude H Howard 

Price. Julia I Atwood 

Stephensou. Nellie Westphalia 

Shomber, Cecilia Ottawa 

Torrenee, Bina B Lucas 

Wilson, Delia Mound Valley 

VIOLIN. 

Brown, Ray Latham 

Nash. Robert Ottawa 

Pearce, Morris Ottawa 

Tate. Ruth Arkansas City 

Veen, Martha Phillipsburg 

Wallace, Anna Hamilton, HI. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART. 



Beaity, May 
Bird. Grace 
Bird. Charity 
Brown. Glenn 
Coen, Mary 
Crawford. Mabel 
Froning, Margaret 
Hardyfcieo 
Holt. Geo. 
Hubbard, Ethel 
McHenrv. Ethel 



Maupin, Hattie 
Mitchell. Cynthia 
Monroe. Morton 
Morrison. Mabel 
Nelson, Oscar 
Nelson, William 
Parrish, Augusta 
Ringer. Vera 
Shoemaker, Edna 
Stewart, Glenn 
Stratton, Marion 
VanCleve, Hattie 



Brown. Glenn 
Monroe. Morton 
Nelson. Osc-ar 
Nelson. William 



MECHANICAL DRAWING. 



Carpenter, C. C. 
Panish, Bernard 
Hutchins, E. A. 
Stewart, Glenn 
Stallard. Harvev 



Bird, Charity 
Bird Ross 



DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION. 



Hutchins, Miss 



Lawrence, Eldred 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



113 



Bushnell, Jennie 
Chaney, Agnes 
Cook, Marsh 
Floyd, Louis 
Garnett. Katheryn 
Green, Beulah 
Hagstrom, Arthur 
Harper. Cecil 
Heritage. Ray 
Hunt, Bertha 



McXutt, W. R. 
Morrison, Mabel 
Ozenberger. George 
Parrish. Bernard 
Pugh, Earl 
Rush, Charles 
Shaw. Robt. 
Shields, J. W. 
Shoufler, E. E. 
Weedman. Walter. 



The Business College. 

STENOGRAPHY COURSE. 



Akers, Adeline Ketmah Ottawa 

Akers, John Deane Ottawa 

Alsop, George Edgar Blue Mound 

Alwes, Lena Ottawa 

Armstrong, Jessie Virginia Ottawa 

Barker, Maude Gertrude Trenton. Mo. 

Barker, Sadie May Ottawa 

Beach, Leila Virgilia Ottawa 

Bell, Maude Olive Ottawa 

Bell, Roy Ernest Ottawa 

Bloornfield, Anna Myra Ottawa 

Brandenbersrer, Wm. Leonard Halstead 

Bristow, Bennie Harrison Osawatomie 

Brown, Katie Frances Ottawa 

Bruner, Earl John Ottawa 

Burk, Floyd Franklin Ottawa 

Caton, John Wesley Anthony 

Carmean, Mattie Amelia Paola 

Cobb. Maybelle Ottawa 

Correll. Addie Melvern 

Cox, Grover David Waverly 

Cox, Rose Mae Waverly 

Crumley, Mary Allena Ottawa 

Cullison, Jesse Owen Anthony 

Dunbar, Charles Princeton 

Ehrlich, Cassie Marion 

Ewalt, Estelle Tern Ottawa 

Ferris. Leslie Yates Center 



114 THE ANNUAL CATALOG 

Flaherty, Winifred Ottawa 

Fletcher Mattie Mae Ottawa 

Fogelberg, Alfred Emmett Republic 

Gamble, Joe Stanley Ottawa 

Geisler, Mary Louise Ottawa 

Goodwin, Ida Mae Rantonl 

Gilliland, Wayne Edie Ottawa 

Greischar, Ollie Ottawa 

Hinkle, Myrtle Olive Peoria 

Hunt, Bertha Estelle Ottawa 

Hood, Dolly Elizabeth Ottawa 

Heck, Essie E Ottawa 

Hostic, Lucy Emma Princeton 

Hogan, Mabelle Majesta Ottawa 

Higgins, Lola Lucille Ottawa 

Holland, Edgar Ulyses Burlington 

Houser, Ervin Palmer Anthony 

Houser, Oradelle Anthony 

Haberly, Elizabeth Marguerite Ottawa 

Hodges, Alice Hewins 

Hall, Alma Casto Wellsville 

Jones, Wilbur Louisburg 

Johnson, Albert Ottawa 

Johnson, Minnie Olivia Ottawa 

Lawrence, Mabel Palisade, Colo. 

Little, Vesta Lucille Pomona 

Monroe, Mary Bowers Ottawa 

Moore, Leland Wightman Ottawa 

Mingle, Ida Mae Anthony 

Merrillat, Grant MeClellan La Fontaine 

Mooney, Frances Ottawa 

Mallory, Etta May Ottawa 

Morrison, Mabel Elizabeth Phillipsburg 

Meeker, William Bently , Meeker, Okla. 

Marsh, Sarah Ottawa 

Miller Charles Leroy Ottawa 

Miller, Elsie Belle Ottawa 

McCullough, Maude Kansas City 

McGee, Warren Luster Ottawa 

Nutt, Sadie Ottawa 

Norton, Louise Ottawa 

Nebelong, Constant Bodil Ottawa 

Owens, Blanche Elizabeth Ottawa 

Peterson, Marie Otilia Ottawa 

Payne. Ray Glick Ottawa 

Phares, Hazel Josephine Ottawa 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 115 

Riddle, Nellie Ottawa 

Raymond, Elizabeth Leo Ester Ottawa 

Robinson, Roy Emerson Ottawa 

Robinson, George Lewis Ottawa 

Ray, Clyde Daniel Ottawa 

Rairden, Lillian Clifton 

Shipp, Willa Ottawa 

Spears, Richard D wight Homewood 

Sponsler, Mary Alice Homewood 

Shirley, Pansy Etheral Ottawa 

Smith, Eugenia Isadora Ottawa 

Stine, Faye Louis Ottawa 

Suffron, Effie Myrtle Ottawa 

SufTron, Albert Roy Ottawa 

S wager, Jesse Cherry vale 

Shireman, Susan Elizabeth Ottawa 

Taylor, Lettie May Ottawa 

Thompson, Ida Mabel Ottawa 

Taylor, Grace Florence Ottawa 

Thayer, Fanny Ellen Waverly 

Van Every, Mamie Edith Anthony 

Van Dresser, Grace Rachel Richter 

Wood, De Loss Tilton Ottawa 

Warner, Florence Ottawa 

Wooley, Irene Ottawa 

Wible, Elizabeth Benton Ottawa 

York, Claud Manchester. Okla. 

COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

Barnhart, Ralph Earl Ottawa 

Becker, Carl Menefee Ottawa 

Blaine, Verne William Ottawa 

Blaine, Henry Lowell Ottawa 

Cathcart, James Daniel Eminence 

Chaney, Osborn Miller Newell, Iowa 

Clark, Hal LaSalle, Ottawa 

Chestnut, Oscar Frank Ottawa 

Fanning, Harry Kennet Waverly 

Forgey, Warren Arthur Wellsville 

Foster, Frank Ottawa 

Fowler, Lulu Ethel Ottawa 

Hayward, William Carrol . Ottawa 

Hinderliter, Carl Daniel Ottawa 

Hutchinson, Allen Harold Ottawa 

Hunt, Marion Lloyd Ottawa 



116 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Johnson, Jaoob Samuel Bessie, Okla. 

Marsh, Charles Lein Ottawa 

Myers, Ray Pat ton Agricola 

Niedermeyer, Carl Henry Athol 

Pease, Loren Howard Richards, Mo. 

Perkins, Charles James Ottawa 

Rabeck, Guy Otto Ottawa 

Rubic, Francis Ottawa 

Sloan, Ruth Fisher Stilwell 

Staley, Vera Grace Richmond 

Stephen;.ou, "Tellie Mae Westphalia 

Tate, Ruth Arkansas City 

Thomas, Willaim Reader Gage, Okla. 

Vernoy, Ada Ottawa 

Weedman, Victor Eugene Ottawa 

Westberg, Peter Halingtend, Sweden 

TELEGRAPHY. 

Bristow, Fred Otis , Osawatomie 

Carpenter, Guy Robert Ottawa 

.Roberts, Mabel Osawatomie 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 117 

Summary of Students. 

THE COLLEGE. 

Post-Graduate 1 

Senior Class 16 

Junior Class 23 

Sophomore Class 27 

Freshman Class 39 

Electives 24— 13© 

THE ACADEMY. 

Senior Class 18 

Middle Class 20 

Junior Class 33 

Electives 18— 89 

THE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Candidates for Teachers 1 Diploma II 

THE SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 
MUSIC. 

Piano ...105 

Voice 29 

Harmony, Theory, Musical History 13 

Violin 6 

ART. 

Art 23 

Mechanical Drawing 9 

ELOCUTION. 

Elocution 24-209 

THE BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

Stenography Course 1G1 

Commercial Course 32 

Telegraphy Course 3— 136" 

Grand Total 575 

Less Repeated Names 110 



Net Total 



465 



118 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Section VI. — The Alumni 
Association. 



THE OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. 



Manly, C. Wareham, 1898 
Drusilla A. Moses, 1905 . 



President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



The Alumni Member of the Board of Trustees. 



Rev, J. T. Crawford, '92. 



Appointments for 1907. 



W. E. Monbeek, '06 
Creanor Lister, '01 . 



Orator 
. Poet 



The regular meetings of the association are held on the Tues- 
day immediately preceding Commencement Day. The alumni ex- 
ercises consist of an open meeting" at eight o'clock in the evening, 
held in the college chapel, and of a banquet and reception to the 
members of the graduating class immediately following the close 
of the open meeting. All alumni are urged to affiliate themselves 
with this organization, and to keep themselves in touch with the 
School. 

The University will be glad to be informed of any changes 
in residence or employment which its graduates may make. The 
aim of the school is to follow every one of its graduates through- 
out life, and to foster and support by all legitimate means, the 
prosperity and usefulness c? its sons and daughters. A complete 
list of the graduates of Ottawa University, together with their 
present addresses will be published in the April number of the 
Ottawa Campus. 



The University has organized a bureau of recommendations, 
of which the president of the University is chairman. The object 



THE BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATIONS. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 



119 



of the bureau is to assist, by recommendations, correspondence, 
nomination and otherwise, its students and graduates in securing 
such positions of confidence and trust as their record and past 
accomplishments may entitle them to hold. The service of the 
bureau is placed unreservedly at the disposal of the alumni and 
former students of Ottawa University. No fee, except a nominal 
one to defray postage and necessary expenses will be charged for 
services rendered. The work of the bureau is planned to be en- 
tirely ec-operative, and the help of every alumnus is asked to 
make the movement a success. 

Communications addressed to the " Bureau of Recommenda- 
tions of Ottawa University' 1 will receive immediate and careful 
attention. 



120 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



Section VII. 



THE DEGREES, CERTIFICATES, DIPLOMAS AND PRIZES 
AWARDED IN CONNECTION WITH THE FORTY-FIRST 
ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT, JUNE 6, 1907. 

CANDIDATES FOR COLLEGIATE DEGREES— JUNE, 1906. 

Bachelor of Arts. 

Name. Present Address 

Abbott, Fidelia Nicholas South Bend, Wash. 

Atchison, James Ross Ottawa, Kansas. 

Ebaugh, Clarence Goodwin Ottawa, Kansas 

Hutehins, Vivian Evangeline Ottawa, Kansas. 

Jones, Elgie Joel Lawrence, Kansas 

Jones, Herbert Charles Wichita, Kansas. 

Jones, Harvey Harrison McLouth, Kansas. 

Monbeek, William Elmer Newton Center, Mass. 

Peck, Mabelle Milne Ottawa, Kansas, 

Ramage, Olive Maude Arkansas City, Kansas. 

Russell, Olive Derby, Kansas 

Wood, Norman Elmore Summerfield, Kansas 



Bachelor of Philosophy. 



Beach, Leila Virgilia 

Bureau, Ernest Adolph 

Estabrook, Claire 

Hildreth, Eva 

Hess, George Lee 

Hoy, Mary Oda 

Manley, Charles Rothwell . . . 
Merriman, Maude Evangeline 

Morse, Alice Mabel 

Reeves, Mary (Veeh) 

Robinson, Florence Rose 



Ottawa, Kansas. 
Ashland, Wis. 



Wellesley, Mass. 
Parsons, Kansas. 



LaJunta, Colo. 

. Long Island, Kansas 
Kansas City, Kansas. 
. . . LaCygne, Kansas. 
Phillipsburg, Kansas. 



Oberlin, Kansas. 
LaCygne, Kansas. 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 121 

Bachelor of Science. 

Christie, Ralph Edgar Kansas City, Mo. 

Collett, Ernest Benjamin Lincoln, HI 

Haigh, Glenn Denver, Colo. 

Kimmel, Ruby Coral McLouth, Kansas. 

Bachelor of Music. 

Peck, Mabelle Milne Ottawa, Kansas. 

Shinn, Laura Tabitha Ottawa, Kansas. 

Master of Science. 

Barker, Clyde James, B. S., M. D., '02 Kaw City, OJda. 



CANDIDATES FOR TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES. 



Abbott, Fidelia N. 
Beach, Leila V. 
Bureau, Ernest A. 
Collett, Ernest B. 
Ebaugh, Clarence G. 
Estabrook, Claire 
Hildreth, Eva. 
Hoy, Mary Oda. 
Hut-chins, Vivian E. 



Jones, Elgie J. 
Jones, Harvey H. 
Kimmel, Ruby C. 
Merriman, Maude E. 
Morse, Alice M. 
Ramage, Olive M. 
Robinson, Florence R. 
Russell, Olive. 
Wood, Norman E. 



CANDIDATES FOR DIPLOMAS IN ACADEMY. 

Classical Course. 

Jones, J. Wilbur Patten, Fern Lillian 

Price, Clair Sandon Woods, Cora Edna 

Philosophical Course. 

Haynes, Lillian Maude. Stewart, Jessie Prudence 

Scientific Course. 

Monroe, Morton Glenn Wood, DeLoss Tilton 



CANDIDATES FOR DIPLOMAS IN THE CONSERVATORY 
Piano. Voice. 

Ramsey, Mrs. Una Howell. Finley, Jessie D. 



122 



THE ANNUAL CATALOG 



CANDIDATES FOR DIPLOMAS IN BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

Stenographic Course. 



Anglenieyer, Grace Evelene 
Arnold, Cora Edith 
Bell, Maude Olive. 
Brown, Catherine Frances 
Elzea, Lloyd Emerson 
Ewalt, Estelle Yern 
Flaherty, Francis M. 
Frazier, Alice Mary 
Gibson, Maude Anne 
Grant, Margerite Helen 
Hardy, Geo Clinton 
Harris, Gertrude J. 
Heitmeyer, Lulu Alice 
Hornbeck, Eunice 



Kassens, Vivian Mary Salome 
Kirehner, Clara Marguerite 
Liton, Sadie Irene 
Liton ; Myrtle Edith 
McDowell, Agnes Mary 
Meeker, Julia Anna 
Miller, Grace E. 
Moorse, Leland Wightman 
Spears, James Glenn 
Thomas, Ellen Sherman 
Veburg, Carl A. 
Veeh, Marguerite Barbara 
Wilkins, Opal 



Commercial Course. 

Bruner, John Earl Mularky, Benjamin 

Embry, Harold E. Oldham, Albert William 

Gamble, Jos. S. Rabeck, Clarence C. 

Kassens, Vivian Mary Salome Veeh, Marguerite B. 
Legg, Wellington E. 



PRIZES AWARDED JUNE, 1906. 



Atkinson Rhetorical Prize Ernest B. Collett 

First Dobson Oratorical Prize Nita B. Constant 

Second Dobson Oratorical Prize Augusta C. Parrish 

First Kinney Essay Prize Ellen Osgood 

Second Kinney Essay Prize Margaret Froning 

First Hageman Declamation Prize Leslie Ferris 

Second Hageman Declamation Prize Marsh Cook 

Mc Wharf Physics Medal Margaret Froning 

Second Physics Prize Raymond Teall 

McWharf Chemistry Medal Glenn Stewart 

Second Chemistry Prize Bernard Parrish 

First National Bank Latin Prize Alice Bell 

( Corrinne Stephenson 
Becker Latin Prize j Robert Wynne 

First Greek Prize Alice Bell 

Second Greek Prize Myrtle Sunderlin 

Third Greek Prize Ray Heritage 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 123 



Index. 

Absences 23 

Academy, The 70 

Classification 73 

Courses of Study 73 

Entrance Requirements 70 

Length of Courses 70 

Schedule of Courses 71 

Advanced Standing 24 

Aid 19 

Alumni Association, The 118 

Art Studio, The 15 

Assets 14 

Athletic Association, The 21 

Athletics, Rule Relating to 24 

Band, The College 22 

Bequests 16 

Board of Trustees, The 7 

Bureau of Recommendations, The 118 

Business College, The 96 

Commercial Course, The 98 

Courses, The 96 

Description of Courses 98 

Entrance Requirements 96 

Groups of Courses, The 97 

Introductory 96 

Privileges 96 

Stenographic Course, The 99 

Telegraphic Course, The 100 

Tuition and Fees 97 

Campus, The 22 

Catalog of Students, The 102 

Academy, The 106 

Business College, The 113 

College, The 103 

Normal School, The 108 

School of Fine Arts, The 108 



124 THE ANNUAL CATALOG 

Total Attendance 117 

Charlton Cottage 14 19 

Charlton Cottage, Committee of Women, The ...3 

Christian Associations 21 

Christian Education 16 

College of Liberal Arts, The 32 

Accredited Schools 38 

Admission, 33 

Admission Units in Detail 35 

Art 50 

Biblical Literature 50 

Biology 51 

Botany 51 

Chemistry 52 

Class Rank 45 

College Courses, The 45 

Cytology 53 

Department of Study 50 

Education 53 

English Language and Literature 55 

Entrance Requirements 33 

French 56 

Geology 57 

German 58 

Greek Language and Literature 59 

Group, The Classical ; 46 

Group, The Philosophical 47 

Group, The Pre-Engineering 48 

Group, The Pre-Medical 49 

Group, The Science 47 

Histology 61 

History 61 

Latin Language and Literature 62 

Master's Degree, The 45 

Mathematics 65 

Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing 65 

Mechanical Drawing 66 

Pedagogy (See Education) 53 

Philosophy 67 

Physics 68 

Physiology 69 

Sociology 69 

Teachers' Certificates 46 

Zoology 70 

Committees of the Faculty 11 

Conservatory, The 15 



OF OTTAWA UNIVERSITY. 125 

Deficiencies 24 

Degrees Awarded June, 190G 120 

Endowment 16 

Entrance Requirements 20 

Equipment 14 

Excess Work 25 

Expenses 18, 25 

Faculty, The 9 

Fees 25 

Diploma 26 

Incidental 25 

Laboratory 25 

General Information 18 

Gifts 16 

Glee Club, The Men's 22 

Grades . 23 

Greeting 3 

Governing Bodies 7 

Government of School 22 

Gymnasium, The 14 

Historical Sketch 12 

Laboratories, The 15 

Library, The 15 

Literary Societies, The 21 

Location of the University 18 

Matriculation 20 

Ministerial Association, The 22 

Museums, The lo 

Needs, The 15 

Normal School, The 78 

Entrance "Requirements 79 

General Information 78 



Normal Course The 

Oratorical Association, The 

Orchestra, The College 

Officers, Other 

Officers of the Board of Trustees 

Officers of the Women's Educational Society 

Present Condition , 

Prizes Offered 

Prizes Awarded June, 1906 

Scholarships 

Scholarships, Endowment 

Scholarships, Ministerial 

Scholarship, The Slocomb 2 

Scholarships, University 2 



126 THE ANNUAL CATALOG 

Scholarship, Fern Willis Fund 27 

School of Fine Arts, The 81 

Choral Instruction 87 

Conservatory of Music, The 82 

Credits Given 82 

Degree Course, The 83 

Departments 81 

Diplomatic Course, The 83 

Entrance Requirements % . 81 

Diploma Course, The S3 

Entrance Requirements 81 

Harmony and Counterpoint 90 

Mandolin and Guitar 89 

Oratory 94 

Orchestra, The College 39 

Physical Education 94 

Piano-Forte 84 

Pipe Organ 86 

Public School Music 88 

School of Art, The 91 

School of Expression, The 92 

Sight Singing 88 

Theory, History, and Literature 89 

Tuition, Fees, Etc., 81 

Violin 83 

Vocal 36 

Schools of the University 32 

Self-Support 19 

Science Hall 14 

Student Organizations 21 

Summary of Students 117 

Tuition 25 

University Calendar, The 5 

University Hall 15 

Women's Loan Fund 29 



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